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Author Topic: 1968 CB 350 Restoration / Upgrade  (Read 7703 times)

Offline jakeZ70

  • Posts: 138
1968 CB 350 Restoration / Upgrade
« on: Jul 18, 2013, 10:16:28 »
I picked up a basket case '68 CB 350 a couple of years ago, and I'm finally getting around to working on it. I purchased two project bikes around the same time just because they were so cheap, I couldn't pass them by. You can see the other here - http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=29346.0

On the up side the previous owner had engine and carbs professionally re-built, and I was given a pile of NOS parts. On the down side I was given coffee cans of nuts, bolts and brackets. Nothing was bagged and labeled, so figuring out what goes where, will take a little time.

As I finish the tear down and start cleaning up the frame and get ready for paint, I want to order some tires, so I can send them out to get mounted and balanced. I've done a lot of searching around DTT trying to decide what sizes to purchase, and there seems to be conflicting opinions. I believe the stock sizes are 90/90-18 Front and 100/90-18 Rear. I've seen a lot of builds where people are using 100/90-18 Front and 110/90-18 Rear, and even larger. I've read comments about how this effects handling. Is that true? How large can you go before they hit the fenders? Is it best to stick with the stock sizes?



Offline HerrDeacon

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Re: 1968 CB 350 Restoration / Upgrade
« Reply #1 on: Jul 18, 2013, 10:32:25 »
If you want the best handling from the CB350, it is recommended to stay with the stock tire sizes, the bike was designed for these sizes. If you want to go larger for aesthetics, then you can go a bit larger but depending on how large you go the tire may rub the front fender brace or forks.

My recommendation is to run the stock sizes.
Perry

1972 Honda CB350 K4 / 1978 Honda XL250S /1982 Honda MB5 / 2014 Honda CB500X

Offline JSJamboree

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Re: 1968 CB 350 Restoration / Upgrade
« Reply #2 on: Jul 18, 2013, 12:39:59 »
If you plan on keeping the rear fender and brackets and stuff im not sure a bigger rear tire will fit.  Im running stock size with some nobbies and I had a hell of a time keeping them from rubbing on everything back there.

Offline jakeZ70

  • Posts: 138
Re: 1968 CB 350 Restoration / Upgrade
« Reply #3 on: Jul 18, 2013, 19:39:31 »
Thanks for the input. Any thoughts on what type of tires, and where to buy them? I've looked all over the place, and the only thing I can find in the 90/90 - 18 and 100/90 - 18 are the same Avons that I'm running on my Cb 175. They're great tires, but I wouldn't mind trying something else out.

http://www.bikebandit.com/avon-am26-roadrider-motorcycle-tire

Offline HerrDeacon

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Re: 1968 CB 350 Restoration / Upgrade
« Reply #4 on: Jul 19, 2013, 06:28:27 »
There were a few different tires mentioned recently in this thread: http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=51388.0
Perry

1972 Honda CB350 K4 / 1978 Honda XL250S /1982 Honda MB5 / 2014 Honda CB500X

Offline Worst cb650 ever

  • Posts: 1491
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Re: 1968 CB 350 Restoration / Upgrade
« Reply #5 on: Jul 19, 2013, 13:09:49 »
I'm running 100's up front and 110s in the rear on my CB360, and they fit fine.  I too had problems finding the stock size tires.  I did find that the front brake hose bracket was bent, as it started rubbing with the larger front tire, so I bent it back into place and all was well.  I'm not sure if this info would also apply to the 350, but I do believe that the front and rear wheel setups are similar. 

Handling seems fine, but this is from only a few miles on the new tires and my comparison is to 37 year original tires.  I suspect wooden wagon wheels would be better than those tires...
DTT Blue (cause Winter is Coming) CB360 Club.

1995 CBR900RR - a winter flip not worth a DTT writeup - Sold

1986 Yamaha SRX600 - mailed to me from California - build coming soon?

1983 VF750F

1976 CB360T

1993 CBR900RR - Sold

1979 CB650 - Sold

Offline Maritime

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Re: 1968 CB 350 Restoration / Upgrade
« Reply #6 on: Jul 19, 2013, 13:20:21 »
Also check into actual tire dimensions on Manufacturers sites as they vary in dimension from one manuf. to another and even in the same manuf but diff model.  Avons 90/90 - 18 may be the same size as bridgestones 100/90 - 18 also you can maybe find a 100/80 -18 that will be very close in actual size as a 90/90.  The sizing is height as a percentage of width and depending on the roundness of the profile the Actual heights and widths can vary quite a bit.  Also check that the rim width you intend to use it on is acceptable to the particular model tire and size.
The GL Rebirth: http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=68337.0
CX500 Low budget Bobber : http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=43617.0
"Beer makes you feel the way you ought to feel without beer" -Henry Lawson
"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." - Thomas Jefferson

Offline jakeZ70

  • Posts: 138
Re: 1968 CB 350 Restoration / Upgrade
« Reply #7 on: Aug 11, 2013, 23:46:27 »
I've made quite a bit of progress as far as rust clean up and polishing. I'm sending parts off to my mechanic tomorrow. Getting the new tires mounted, fork seal and wheel bearing installed.

The tank was in pretty rough shape, inside and out. I decided to try the apple cider vinegar trick. I shook a bunch of dry wall screws inside to start. Then added the cider vinegar, and let it set for about five or six days. Ran the vinegar through some cloth to remove the large chunks of rust and sludge that came out. It was pretty nasty. About an eighth of a cup total. I was impressed. I put the vinegar back in, and let it set for another couple of days. Rinsed out the vinegar with water, then water and baking soda. Unfortunately I think the tank was just to rusted. While a lot of it was removed, I think there's still too much in the tank. I think I'm going to bring it to a radiator shop and see what they can do with it.

Today while I was cleaning the heavy grease off the frame in preparation for stripping it, I found a small hole. I'm hoping this is a fairly easy fix. I don't know anything about welding. Any ideas on what fixing a hole like this might cost? It seems to be pretty solid all around the hole. No soft spots or cracks.

Also on the opposite side of the frame the foot peg bar bracket looks like it might be bent. The frame around it looks straight, and the bracket looks square to itself. it just looks twisted. Is this correct?
 

Offline jakeZ70

  • Posts: 138
Re: 1968 CB 350 Restoration / Upgrade
« Reply #8 on: Aug 11, 2013, 23:47:13 »
More pics.

Offline jakeZ70

  • Posts: 138
Re: 1968 CB 350 Restoration / Upgrade
« Reply #9 on: Aug 12, 2013, 11:31:35 »
I did some calling around, and it looks like it would cost 150 bucks to get the tank cleaned up at a radiator shop. Not quite in my budget, so I think I'm going to give POR-15 a try.