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Author Topic: 1970 Triumph Tiger 650  (Read 30083 times)

Offline doc_rot

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Re: 1970 Triumph Tiger 650
« Reply #50 on: Mar 10, 2016, 19:23:56 »
that jeep rescue green looks really good. I have been thinking about painting a project with that color. nice work. if the brazing doesnt seal that tank up i would use some silver solder for the pinholes. It wicks into small holes and will make a good seal. also its pretty easy to use then you dont have to deal with tank sealers.
« Last Edit: Mar 10, 2016, 19:26:31 by doc_rot »

Offline o1marc

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Re: 1970 Triumph Tiger 650
« Reply #51 on: Mar 10, 2016, 20:15:49 »
that jeep rescue green looks really good. I have been thinking about painting a project with that color. nice work. if the brazing doesnt seal that tank up i would use some silver solder for the pinholes. It wicks into small holes and will make a good seal. also its pretty easy to use then you dont have to deal with tank sealers.
You would be really foolish to not use a sealer on a tank that has this much rust through. Silver solder may work on the outside but it doesn't stop what's going on inside the tank.
I set out to tackle the hole issue today and ended up with this, copied and pasted from another thread.

So I start searching for a welder today to braze up my holes. Was striking out as none of them do brazing. Then it dawned on me that this is not a welding job, but a braze job most likely accomplished by a radiator shop. I just happen to know one locally, they used to sponsor my race car. So I grab the tank and raced on down there only to find that the guy who does the radiator repair there died of cancer last year and they haven't been able to find a competent replacement. We talked and he told me the tank was definitely fixable and referred me to 2 other places about 25 miles away. He told me that even a 2 part epoxy could be used to fill the holes. I called one of the shops that said they could fix it and hem and hawed and changed his tune without seeing the pics and said they probably wouldn't be able to help me, but bring it down to look at. It was at this point I said screw it and went home and got out the JB Weld and started filling holes. Looks like this is going to be adequate. I sold another $285 worth of Honda parts today so I'll go ahead and order some Caswell sealer and try and finish the tank.
I pushed on the holes areas with my thumb and you can't move any of the metal because it is too thin.
Earlier in the day I made a call and found a brand new unpainted tank in the box for $500, it's a deal , but I don't have $500 right now. No I won't say where I found it, I may get it later.









Offline DohcBikes

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Re: 1970 Triumph Tiger 650
« Reply #52 on: Mar 11, 2016, 01:18:43 »
Silver solder may work on the outside but it doesn't stop what's going on inside the tank.
Neither does 'sealer'.
burning bridges sometimes light the most productive paths

Offline o1marc

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Re: 1970 Triumph Tiger 650
« Reply #53 on: Mar 11, 2016, 02:08:36 »
Neither does 'sealer'.
If the metal is not exposed to oxygen it shouldn't promote the continuation of the oxidation process. Either way his statement about silver solder eliminating the need for a sealer is incorrect. Someone told me today that even if the tank is sealed a pinhole in the metal will still leak. :o
« Last Edit: Mar 11, 2016, 12:21:46 by o1marc »

Online goldy

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Re: 1970 Triumph Tiger 650
« Reply #54 on: Mar 11, 2016, 08:01:05 »
Over the past 40+ years I've done this sort of work time and time again and he is right...even the best sealers will leak at pinholes and cracks(eventually). I would never do this sort of work without applying a high quality liner afterward, but gasoline has incredible capillary action...make sure it is air tight before you apply the sealer. 
« Last Edit: Mar 11, 2016, 08:06:19 by goldy »
1948 Norton ES2
1955 AJS 20B
1956 Triumph TRW
1968 Triumph T100 special
1969 Norton Commando
1975 XS650 Yamaha

Offline DohcBikes

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Re: 1970 Triumph Tiger 650
« Reply #55 on: Mar 11, 2016, 09:52:42 »
Whatever you say. I guess all the brazed, leak free atc tanks (some of the worst leakers out there btw) I have are just plain luck.  ::)

If you have leaks after brazing, you didnt do it right.
burning bridges sometimes light the most productive paths

Offline irk miller

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Re: 1970 Triumph Tiger 650
« Reply #56 on: Mar 11, 2016, 09:58:20 »
The Duc tank I got at Barber turned out to be trashed under braze and Bondo.  It was a turd that did not leak. 


Offline o1marc

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Re: 1970 Triumph Tiger 650
« Reply #57 on: Mar 11, 2016, 12:20:33 »
Over the past 40+ years I've done this sort of work time and time again and he is right...even the best sealers will leak at pinholes and cracks(eventually). I would never do this sort of work without applying a high quality liner afterward, but gasoline has incredible capillary action...make sure it is air tight before you apply the sealer.
Have you used the new Caswell liner? I have heard nothing but good things about. Caswell says you don't even have to fill the holes, just put tape over them on the outside and line the tank. It's crazy that your telling me there isn't a sealer out there that will actually do what it's intended to do.

Online goldy

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Re: 1970 Triumph Tiger 650
« Reply #58 on: Mar 11, 2016, 12:58:46 »
Yeah, I know it sounds crazy...beaten that dead horse long enough :)
YES, yes, yes, Caswell all the way! I have  nothing but good things to say about that product. I've used Kream, POR15 and Redcoat, but in the past couple of years I wont use anything else but the Caswell product. IMO the best thing about liners is that they will prevent any of the rust and crap that may still be lurking in the hard to clean parts of the tank from getting into your carburetors.
1948 Norton ES2
1955 AJS 20B
1956 Triumph TRW
1968 Triumph T100 special
1969 Norton Commando
1975 XS650 Yamaha

Offline DohcBikes

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Re: 1970 Triumph Tiger 650
« Reply #59 on: Mar 11, 2016, 13:01:10 »
IMO the best thing about liners is that they will prevent any of the rust and crap that may still be lurking in the hard to clean parts of the tank from getting into your carburetors.
Ever heard of fuel filters? Maybe in 40 years you have overlooked them. They are placed in line with the fuel line, and they, get this, filter the fuel before it enters the carb.
burning bridges sometimes light the most productive paths