collapse

www.dimecitycycles.com


www.restocycle.com

www.CITYLIMITMOTO.com

www.jadusmotorcycleparts.com

www.bisonmotorsports.com

www.speedmotoco.com

www.lostapostlejewelry.com

www.cognitomoto.com

www.townmoto.com

www.sparckmoto.com

www.Moto-Madness.com

www.pistonsociety.com

www.steeltowngarage.com


Author Topic: 1971 CB175 (Which direction?)  (Read 695 times)

Offline MikeHall

  • Posts: 2
1971 CB175 (Which direction?)
« on: Dec 05, 2017, 01:32:09 »
I picked up this complete 1971 CB175 this past weekend. I must say this is just like I like to find them, totally untouched, complete, and has not even been registered sense 1977. I got this bike for $100 and even got the title. After getting the bike home i started to tear into the major areas of the unknown like will the thing even turn over. The kick starter splines on the shaft are stripped but i was able to widen the gap in the kick starter enough to get it to clamp down hard enough to discover that the engine kicks over nicely. I then took the exhaust and carbs off to find the intake and exhaust ports are totally rust free and actually nice and clean. The carbs are in bad shape inside with ultra bad varnish buildup but mostly due to corrosion on one of the jets which broke off inside the carb body. So anyhow, My questions come in the area on what direction to take this build. I can for sure appreciate a restored bike and I think I could see myself riding it around but i would honestly like a touch more sportiness. Are these bikes worth anything restored? Its hard to find one for sale in good shape so I have no idea. Here are some questions I have to mull over.

First, the fuel tank is trash. It is totally rusted out and junk. There are plenty of CB175 tanks out there for sale but I have found myself really liking the CB350 tank shape. Now I have looked at frames from both the 175 and 350 and although not the same they look as if tanks may interchange. If I wanted to use a 350 tank I am assuming it would fit without too much modifications. Again, on such a bike would it deduct from the value by doing a restromod rather than a straight up restoration?

The second issue has to do with the carbs. Like I stated above they are in bad shape but i guess they could be bought back to life. I was thinking about just getting some VM20's and calling it a day but I have not really found any details on a good setup with these carbs. I can see that filter selection may be an issue but I can sort that out later. Anyone have experience in setting ones of these 175s up with the VM20's? Even filter setup details would be nice although I have some ideas on how to make more room if need for just a basic cone filter setup.

The last area i need to address is the ignition. All the wiring seems to be in decent shape on the bike but the spark plug wires are stiff and the coil just looks like it has seen better days. The points look fantastic and i guess avoided moister exposure over the last 40 plus years. I was wondering if I should just get a replacement coil pack or are there other popular options? I did read that the electronic ignition is really not needed for a street bike but maybe that was just one persons opinion. I figured if i updated the carbs I may update the ignition but neither may even be desirable or suggested or possibly both suggested.


Below is my CB175 and also a picture of a CB350 that I really am digging the look of. I would honestly seek to reproduce that look unless it would destroy the bikes value.

Offline teazer

  • DTT SUPPORTER
  • *
  • DTT BOTM WINNER
  • *
  • Posts: 8553
Re: 1971 CB175 (Which direction?)
« Reply #1 on: Dec 05, 2017, 02:29:52 »
Some thoughts in no particular order:

CB175 value as a fully restored bike is not a whole lot, so go for it

Electronic ignition and a new double ended 5 ohm coil would be a good investment in terms of easy starting and reliability - and maintenance free.

Get new plugs and clean the carbs with a good long soak in an ultrasonic cleaner.  If they are too far gone, consider some small flatslides.

Do not fit fat tires like that POS art bike. Fit skinny tires with minimal rolling resistance.

Do not fit turn out pipes.  Fit some decent mufflers for better performance and sound

Offline The Limey

  • Posts: 398
  • Evil English Villain
Re: 1971 CB175 (Which direction?)
« Reply #2 on: Dec 05, 2017, 04:42:13 »
I'd restore it close to standard, but with some period mods that might have found favour back in its day, such as ace bars, cropped fenders etc.  Also mods to make it more rideable, such as electronic ignition.

They're not worth a huge amount...yet.  The rate they're being chopped up and having badly fitted brat seats means straight ones will be extinct soon and prices will rise.  Plus everyone is doing the stripped cafe/brat thing with them.  I've nothing against that per se  other than its lack of imagination

But its your bike.  Do what you feel is right.
I was born a rocker.  I'll die a rocker.  And I'm proud of it.

Offline goldy

  • Posts: 390
Re: 1971 CB175 (Which direction?)
« Reply #3 on: Dec 13, 2017, 08:08:08 »
I would like to see it restored, but it will never be worth what you spend on it....restorations are a labour of love, not a money maker...but they are almost always worth more than a modified machine. Ether way, as usual, if you're going to mod it, I suggest you don't hack it up, or do anything you cant easily undo, just in case someone does want to restore it someday....been there, done that and got the 'T' shirt (and the scars).
1948 Norton ES2
1955 AJS 20B
1956 Triumph TRW
1968 Triumph T100 special
1969 Norton Commando
1975 XS650 Yamaha

Offline WhyNot

  • DTT SUPPORTER
  • *
  • Posts: 1114
  • ~~~If it ain't raining, I'm riding~~{iii}?~~prost~
Re: 1971 CB175 (Which direction?)
« Reply #4 on: Dec 13, 2017, 12:17:56 »
Some thoughts in no particular order:

CB175 value as a fully restored bike is not a whole lot, so go for it

Electronic ignition and a new double ended 5 ohm coil would be a good investment in terms of easy starting and reliability - and maintenance free.

Get new plugs and clean the carbs with a good long soak in an ultrasonic cleaner.  If they are too far gone, consider some small flatslides.

Do not fit fat tires like that POS art bike. Fit skinny tires with minimal rolling resistance.

Do not fit turn out pipes.  Fit some decent mufflers for better performance and sound

Pardon my ignorance.......but what are flatsides?

And yes do as you please on the bike, make it your own, but do not chop up the  frame or do irreversible mods.

Unless of course it was a total rag bag frame, that isn't restorable or repairable.
« Last Edit: Dec 13, 2017, 12:23:35 by WhyNot »
2006 Harley Davidson Heritage Softail
1975 Honda CB750K5 needs carb work
1974 Honda CB350F2 needs tins painted (being lazy)
1972 Honda CB175K2 roller no engine
1972 Honda CB/CL350 Engines need roller
1972 Honda SL350K2 Frame for above engine
1972 Honda CB100K2 needs kicker shaft
1990 Mitsubishi MM needs engine rebuild
1984 Dodge D50 Beater DD since 1997

Offline teazer

  • DTT SUPPORTER
  • *
  • DTT BOTM WINNER
  • *
  • Posts: 8553
Re: 1971 CB175 (Which direction?)
« Reply #5 on: Dec 13, 2017, 14:11:35 »
Flatslide carbs such as TM24 or OKO or Keihin PWK series.  A flatslide carb is generally more responsive than a round slide carb and usually makes slightly more power than the equivalent round carb of the same nominal size.  They are very popular among the pit bike set