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Author Topic: 1970 Triumph Tiger 650  (Read 29875 times)

Offline goldy

  • Posts: 411
Re: 1970 Triumph Tiger 650
« Reply #40 on: Mar 05, 2016, 08:39:46 »
Wow...that tank has indeed seen better days! Going to try to find a new one or a decent used one?
1948 Norton ES2
1955 AJS 20B
1956 Triumph TRW
1968 Triumph T100 special
1969 Norton Commando
1975 XS650 Yamaha

Offline o1marc

  • Posts: 2242
    • Creative Candy Powder Coating
Re: 1970 Triumph Tiger 650
« Reply #41 on: Mar 05, 2016, 11:22:16 »
Wow...that tank has indeed seen better days! Going to try to find a new one or a decent used one?

Yes. ???

Offline DohcBikes

  • Posts: 2384
  • Fuck You.
Re: 1970 Triumph Tiger 650
« Reply #42 on: Mar 05, 2016, 11:30:37 »
Jumping on board, first triumph build i've been interested in as far as I can remember.
burning bridges sometimes light the most productive paths

Offline Bootsey

  • DTT SUPPORTER
  • *
  • Posts: 250
Re: 1970 Triumph Tiger 650
« Reply #43 on: Mar 05, 2016, 17:38:51 »
The calipers are powder coated in a Gold Vein. Veins are powders that cure with a black base and a colored top, in either Gold, Silver, Copper or Penny. The same texture type powder that has the same color but different shades in the base and top patterns is called a Hammertone, where the low sections are darker than the higher pattern. So mine are coated in Gold Vein, the name Triumph is a vinyl decal, and then the caliper is clear coated in powder to seal the lettering in and bring out the texture of the powder.

Awesome, interesting stuff - cheers for the explanation.

Offline o1marc

  • Posts: 2242
    • Creative Candy Powder Coating
Re: 1970 Triumph Tiger 650
« Reply #44 on: Mar 05, 2016, 23:02:40 »
Started looking around for a place to mount the rear master cylinder, there's not a lot of places to put one. As it turns out it was an easy mod to put it in the only place it will fit and be an extremely easy hook up to the pedal. I'll just make me a new passenger peg mounting plate that has an extended bottom to mount the m/c to the back side of. Fortunately the actuating arm on the brake pedal is removable and can be clocked in 45 increments. I just needed to turn it down so it is pushing instead of pulling. Unfortunately the actuating arm is not bent in the correct orientation for this application, but heating and bending it is an easy fix to clearance the frame rail.





Offline o1marc

  • Posts: 2242
    • Creative Candy Powder Coating
Re: 1970 Triumph Tiger 650
« Reply #45 on: Mar 07, 2016, 17:54:11 »
Looks like it all can be located on the passenger peg bracket. Bored a hole through to locate the hose and made a small strap to bolt the reservoir to.



The m/c fitting was in the wrong location so I had to cut it off and clock it in the correct position before JB Welding it back together.


Offline o1marc

  • Posts: 2242
    • Creative Candy Powder Coating
Re: 1970 Triumph Tiger 650
« Reply #46 on: Mar 07, 2016, 22:46:35 »
Clearer pics  ;) of the master cylinder set up. Found a 90 banjo fitting so routing the fluid line shouldn't be an issue. This all worked out amazingly simple:




« Last Edit: Mar 08, 2016, 00:05:52 by o1marc »

Offline o1marc

  • Posts: 2242
    • Creative Candy Powder Coating
Re: 1970 Triumph Tiger 650
« Reply #47 on: Mar 09, 2016, 20:31:50 »
The rest of the tank seemed structurally sound after inspection and I realized what had happened. Some time during the 40 years this bike sat water got in the tank. The bike apparently spent many of those years on the side stand leaning left. All the holes are on the left edge and petcock. I am going to try and braze the holes and seal it after.

Offline goldy

  • Posts: 411
Re: 1970 Triumph Tiger 650
« Reply #48 on: Mar 10, 2016, 07:16:09 »
This sort of thing happens a lot around here (especially on the thinner gauge Japanese tanks)...so much rain and fog. it's obvious that you "know your stuff" but here's a suggestion: It can be very time consuming and downright frustrating trying to get all the little pin holes brazed up, but it can definitely be done. When you think you have it all nice and fuel tight,I suggest you find a way to pressure test it like a tire tube before you apply a liner....only needs one or two psi and some soapy water.  Even tiny pin holes will eventually leak despite the liner and ruin a gorgeous paint job. 
1948 Norton ES2
1955 AJS 20B
1956 Triumph TRW
1968 Triumph T100 special
1969 Norton Commando
1975 XS650 Yamaha

Offline o1marc

  • Posts: 2242
    • Creative Candy Powder Coating
Re: 1970 Triumph Tiger 650
« Reply #49 on: Mar 10, 2016, 11:45:34 »
This sort of thing happens a lot around here (especially on the thinner gauge Japanese tanks)...so much rain and fog. it's obvious that you "know your stuff" but here's a suggestion: It can be very time consuming and downright frustrating trying to get all the little pin holes brazed up, but it can definitely be done. When you think you have it all nice and fuel tight,I suggest you find a way to pressure test it like a tire tube before you apply a liner....only needs one or two psi and some soapy water.  Even tiny pin holes will eventually leak despite the liner and ruin a gorgeous paint job.
To an untrained ear this sounds ludicrous, the top of the line tank sealers leak? I have to fix it because replacement used units are almost impossible to find and cost $500 or more for rough ones that needs work.