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Author Topic: Universal Healthcare how does it work?  (Read 3446 times)

Online farmer92

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Re: Universal Healthcare how does it work?
« Reply #90 on: Jan 12, 2018, 08:55:38 »
No
She would have been put on a stretcher in the hallway for 37 hours before dying of dehydration.


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Offline stroker crazy

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Re: Universal Healthcare how does it work?
« Reply #91 on: Jan 12, 2018, 09:29:42 »
Would this happen in Canada or the United Kingdom?

God knows the system here in Oz could be improved, but it's good enough.

Fast approaching my use-by date, I've recently had a minor health issue.

Three visits to a GP, a blood test, an ultrasound, an impending visit to a cardiologist.

Cost: zero

Crazy
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Offline Sonreir

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Re: Universal Healthcare how does it work?
« Reply #92 on: Jan 12, 2018, 10:18:10 »
I lived in the UK for a few years in my 20s. I almost always got to see my GP next day. My first child was born there (difficult labor, started in birthing center and the Mrs had to get an ambulance ride to the hospital after 24 hours). We took a visit to the emergency room after the wife got clobbered in the head by a falling ladder. Service was always excellent and the outcomes were what we would hope them to be. I don't remember paying anything out of pocket and my old pay stubs indicate I paid about $300 a month for all of it.

My current pay stub indicates that I contribute $170 a month for dental, $120 a month for my flexible spending account (allows me to use pre-tax dollars to pay for health care-related items such as co-pays or deductibles), $23 a month for vision, and $1747 for my family's health insurance. So yeah, I spend $24,720 a year on health care, and that's if I don't even need to use it. If I exceed a certain usage level, I will incur additional out of pocket costs. My eldest is getting braces this year, I can guarantee I'm going to be paying more. I've never had any real complaints about the quality of care I've received, but my GP is often booked out weeks (and one time, months) in advance. The dentistry here is WAY better than what I got in Britain, but, to me, the two systems have been more-or-less similar aside from the cost.
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Audaces fortuna iuvat.

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1976 Puch Maxi - APuchalypse Now
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Re: Universal Healthcare how does it work?
« Reply #93 on: Jan 12, 2018, 12:07:45 »
I lived in the UK for a few years in my 20s. I almost always got to see my GP next day. My first child was born there (difficult labor, started in birthing center and the Mrs had to get an ambulance ride to the hospital after 24 hours). We took a visit to the emergency room after the wife got clobbered in the head by a falling ladder. Service was always excellent and the outcomes were what we would hope them to be. I don't remember paying anything out of pocket and my old pay stubs indicate I paid about $300 a month for all of it.

My current pay stub indicates that I contribute $170 a month for dental, $120 a month for my flexible spending account (allows me to use pre-tax dollars to pay for health care-related items such as co-pays or deductibles), $23 a month for vision, and $1747 for my family's health insurance. So yeah, I spend $24,720 a year on health care, and that's if I don't even need to use it. If I exceed a certain usage level, I will incur additional out of pocket costs. My eldest is getting braces this year, I can guarantee I'm going to be paying more. I've never had any real complaints about the quality of care I've received, but my GP is often booked out weeks (and one time, months) in advance. The dentistry here is WAY better than what I got in Britain, but, to me, the two systems have been more-or-less similar aside from the cost.

I think a lot of Americans who rant an rail against the health care of the UK, Canada, and elsewhere, believe the BS they are told about how bad the systems are despite the evidence and testimonies from other places. And they have a knee-jerk reaction to what they perceive as the specter of "socialism." The last year has sort of proven that there are a lot of people in the US who don't pay much attention and believe what they're told from unreliable sources. Pretty amazing, really.
"Remember when Goldwings were sexy? Me neither" -- Comet Tavern bathroom, Seattle.

Offline Sonreir

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Re: Universal Healthcare how does it work?
« Reply #94 on: Jan 12, 2018, 12:16:52 »
Socialism is definitely an aspect of it. One other things I've heard repeated fairly often is that we have "the best health care in the world". A lot of folks who have health care are concerned that if we go to a system that costs less, they'll be receiving less. I think there is a significant number of people here that honest believe that this is how much decent health care should cost.
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Audaces fortuna iuvat.

1977 Honda CJ360 - Cafť SOS - Stage Oneô, Cafť SOS - Stage Twoô
1976 Puch Maxi - APuchalypse Now
Suzi T500 Cobra Resto

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Offline CrabsAndCylinders

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Re: Universal Healthcare how does it work?
« Reply #95 on: Jan 12, 2018, 16:02:25 »
I live in Canada and while I think there could be some improvements to our healthcare system, it is a very good system.  Last year I was diagnosed with cancer, if I had to pay for the surgery and chemo and all related doctor appointments I would have been bankrupted.  Unlike what some Republicans said back when Obama was promoting "Obamacare", we have no "death doctors" and we can choose what doctors we want to see.  Wait times could be improved for some procedures and more things could be covered such as dental and drug prescription costs.  The insurance industry of course would like to change this because they would like to profit from eliminating our healthcare system.  From what I have read, healthcare costs a lot more in the US than Canada and I see no advantage and instead potential harm to people by going to private health insurance.
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Online farmer92

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Re: Universal Healthcare how does it work?
« Reply #96 on: Jan 12, 2018, 22:53:05 »
I live in Canada and while I think there could be some improvements to our healthcare system, it is a very good system.  Last year I was diagnosed with cancer, if I had to pay for the surgery and chemo and all related doctor appointments I would have been bankrupted.  Unlike what some Republicans said back when Obama was promoting "Obamacare", we have no "death doctors" and we can choose what doctors we want to see.  Wait times could be improved for some procedures and more things could be covered such as dental and drug prescription costs.  The insurance industry of course would like to change this because they would like to profit from eliminating our healthcare system.  From what I have read, healthcare costs a lot more in the US than Canada and I see no advantage and instead potential harm to people by going to private health insurance.

Glad you made it this far through the fight man.
I agree, the system could be better, the wait times in the ER are ridiculous, but is to be expected. Its free, people show up with the sniffles and just waste the staffs time being told to go home and rest.
If the american healthcare outcomes were phenomenal, i might listen to some arguments for their system, but as it stands the outcomes indicate that chances of a positive outcome in the US health system are not as good as most developed countries. Thť latest WHO report i could find indicates that they had the highest expenditure per capita and ranked 72 in terms of actual health outcomes.

Offline runmikeyrun

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Universal Healthcare how does it work?
« Reply #97 on: Jan 18, 2018, 02:55:49 »
Glad you made it this far through the fight man.
I agree, the system could be better, the wait times in the ER are ridiculous, but is to be expected. Its free, people show up with the sniffles and just waste the staffs time being told to go home and rest.
If the american healthcare outcomes were phenomenal, i might listen to some arguments for their system, but as it stands the outcomes indicate that chances of a positive outcome in the US health system are not as good as most developed countries. Thť latest WHO report i could find indicates that they had the highest expenditure per capita and ranked 72 in terms of actual health outcomes.

As a healthcare worker in the US (fire/EMS and RN) I can assure you wait times at most Emergency departments in the states are also horrible.  We have the same problem- everyone goes there for the sniffles, GI bug, stitches, etc.  Part of the reason is the poorest people (Medicaid, or no insurance) donít pay so it doesnít matter.  Those with no insurance simply donít have a doctor if they canít afford to pay out of pocket, so they have to use the ED for everything.

The other part is most people with insurance canít get in to see their doctor in a timely manner.  If youíve had a roaring sinus infection for two days you canít call and get an appointment next day, or even that week you have to go somewhere else to get treatment.  We do have Stat Care facilities, which are good for minor illness/injury but for some reason people are still drawn to the ED.

Most anyone with insurance either has a high Co-pay for the ED, up to $500 out of pocket, or they have a high deductible plan.  I have the latter- I pay a monthly premium ($160) and I also pay the first $1,900 of any care I need in that calendar year.  If I donít need any care or medicine I only pay the monthly premium.  If I need a $5 prescription I pay $5; if I need an $800 prescription I have to pay $800.  You keep paying until you meet that $1,900.  Then everything is covered 100%.  Iím not sure about you, but Iíve been in a position that I needed a prescription that was $500.  I had to simply go without.  And so do others- we see patients get discharged, canít afford their medications, get sicker and are re-admitted to the hospital.  Itís ridiculous.

Itís a terrible plan for healthy people because you almost never reach the $1,900 so I you pay for everything out of pocket along with the monthly deductible.  Itís a great plan for someone who gets diagnosed with a serious illness because your bill might be $50,000 but youíll only pay $1,900. 

I went to the ED for a kidney stone in November, and met my deductible for the year, funny how my total came out to $2,050.  The insurance only had to pay out $150 for me last year, yet collected almost $2,000 in premiums from me.  I paid the nearly $2,000 in premiums plus the entire $1,900 deductible. 

Insurance company: +$1,850
Me: -$3,900

Itís unsustainable for people in the long run.  This is one reason why people feel they are being ripped off by insurance companies.

I realize that higher taxes mean less money in your pocket, however you donít suddenly have to come up with a large sum like you do here.  You also donít have to avoid care, like I am right now, because you canít afford it.  I started having a mild heart arrhythmia the last week of December, I couldnít get an appointment until January.  My deductible is now back at $0 which means Iíll have to pay for any testing, visits, lab work, etc which will most likely be around $1,000 and thatís if they donít find anything wrong and just tell me to keep an eye on it.  I still owe $1,000 from last year!  Itís easy to see how quickly you can get in a lot of debt just from being sick.


Here's where I list all my bikes:
'71 Kaw 250 Bison
'81 KZ750 cafe
'94 XR250L
2014 Yamaha Bolt

In progress: '68 CL350
« Last Edit: Jan 18, 2018, 03:02:30 by runmikeyrun »
END OF LINE.

Live to ride, Ride or die.

Past:
Rupp Minibike
Benelli Minibike
Tomos Moped (lol)
74 RD250
81 XT125
76 KH400
79 YZ250
77 RD400

Present:
14 Yamaha Bolt
81 KZ750E
94 XR250L
68 CL350 (in process)

Yeah, it's dangerous.  That's why I like it.

Offline Scooter trash

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Re: Universal Healthcare how does it work?
« Reply #98 on: Jan 27, 2018, 17:30:01 »
My Great Granddaughter caught the flu and had to go to the Hospital, with Utah Medicaid. The nurse tried to send her home with the instructions, if she turned blue, bring her back. Thankfully my Grandaughter wasn't going to buy this crap, her oxygen was already low 90s. After being examined by another nurse, she was admitted to the hospital for the next two days, hooked up to breathing tubes. A friend of the family had her young son die from this last week. Sometimes I think we live in a shithole.
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Offline ankof

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Re: Universal Healthcare how does it work?
« Reply #99 on: Feb 11, 2018, 18:01:29 »
In sweden I am about average payed and pay about 30% in tax. I get free healthcare. Only thing not covered is teeths, Free education, + alot of other stuff.. its a good deal. I dont have to worry and all calculations Ive seen says its cheaper to share some basic stuff than paying it  individually..