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Author Topic: CB77 Superhawk Build  (Read 25687 times)

Offline jsharpphoto

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CB77 Superhawk Build
« on: Jun 20, 2013, 19:18:26 »
I figured now that I'm at the point where i'm actually working on the bike (i've had it since october), I might as well start a project thread.  I got this from a friend for next to nothing, with a title.  It was "almost" running, meaning that it had been running and then suddenly became "not running" when he tried to customize it. 

I'm going to clean it up, trim a lot of fat, and get it drivable.  My initial thought was to do whatever possible to get it to do the ton.  Honda said the bike would do 99 from the factory.  We shall see. 

Here's the bike on day one.

Offline jsharpphoto

  • Posts: 510
Re: CB77 Superhawk Build
« Reply #1 on: Jun 20, 2013, 19:25:36 »
So far i've removed the rear fender and tail light assembly, I swapped some dime city club mans instead of the very narrow drag bars, and started working on a new seat.  There have been several recent superhawk builds to get some attention, most notably the raw metal one on Pipeburn last year.  There have been things about that and other builds that i've liked, but none of them really nailed it for me. 

A common trend in restomodding these bikes is removing the iconic components of the superhawk, most often the chrome tank panels.  I'm keeping those.  There is a "spine" on the tank that goes front to back, that I'm carrying on to the seat design.

I made a mold of the rear of the tank, and then made a new seat hump from that mold.  I know that's nothing new, but it seemed to be the best way of continuing that spine and matching the curvature of the tank.  It needs a lot of cleanup, sure, but this photo was taken just minutes after pulling it out of the mold, i haven't even cleaned the wax off of it yet.

Offline jsharpphoto

  • Posts: 510
Re: CB77 Superhawk Build
« Reply #2 on: Jun 20, 2013, 19:26:37 »
Here's a side view of the seat. 

Offline jsharpphoto

  • Posts: 510
Re: CB77 Superhawk Build
« Reply #3 on: Jun 20, 2013, 19:33:19 »
the original owner (not the previous owner) put the pod filters on it.  I can't decide if i'm going to keep them, or the original filters and wrap them with K&N foam.  I've heard that these bikes run better with the stock filters. 

so far, i've purchased the emgo dunstall mufflers and a 520 chain conversion kit and new sprockets that are better suited to my speed goals.

Re: CB77 Superhawk Build
« Reply #4 on: Jun 20, 2013, 19:59:06 »
I dig these bikes...
"Remember when Goldwings were sexy? Me neither" -- Comet Tavern bathroom, Seattle.

Offline jsharpphoto

  • Posts: 510
Re: CB77 Superhawk Build
« Reply #5 on: Jun 21, 2013, 22:47:31 »
I'm not sure why my photos are appearing upside down or rotated like that.  They appear correctly if you click on them to view them full size.  I may be lazy, but i'm not THAT lazy.

Tonight i removed the stock mufflers (which are kind of valuable) and i'll put the dunstall replicas on this weekend.  I still can't make up my mind about the air filters.  I put the side covers back on and it looked kind of silly since i'm not running a rear fender, the side covers don't really cover the whole area, and it's a bit sloppy.

Offline jsharpphoto

  • Posts: 510
Re: CB77 Superhawk Build
« Reply #6 on: Jul 05, 2013, 16:48:16 »
I need some advice on my seat design.  I built the seat pan to fit appropriately on the frame rails, which it does nicely.  Since then, i've decided to remount the side covers after realizing the pods will be awful for performance.  I took a picture of the top down view, does it bother anyone else that the air box is wider than the seat?

I can't decide if it looks stupid, or I just FEEL stupid for not anticipating this.  If the consensus is that it looks bad, I will widen the seat pan in the appropriate area so it is the same width as the tank, which should be close enough to the width of the air box that it's not noticeable.

I also want to extend the side covers back to the frame brace, and connect them in the back to create the inner fender since i'm not running the stock rear fender.
« Last Edit: Jul 05, 2013, 16:56:13 by jsharpphoto »

Offline clem

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Re: CB77 Superhawk Build
« Reply #7 on: Jul 05, 2013, 17:15:18 »
If you're going to extend the side covers back you should just make new ones and tuck them in. Do like you did with the tank and use the original side covers as a mold. Then either keep the originals in case you decide to go back with them or sell them to a superhawk guy. By the way, superhawks are rad looking bikes straight from the factory.
"After every war there are soldiers who refuse to surrender. To this day there are still thousands who cling to their 30+ year old motorcycles, thinking that the war is still on, refusing to concede that the four-strokes have won"

1972 DS7 http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=45886.msg505995#msg505995
1983 CB550sc bobber http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=30599.30

Offline teazer

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Re: CB77 Superhawk Build
« Reply #8 on: Jul 05, 2013, 17:33:21 »
It's OK to keep stock side covers.  they look nice. Slight overhang - not a problem.  They do on many bikes.

Pods are OK too, but use good pods if you have to go that way.  Aftermarket/replica filters are available though.

Offline jsharpphoto

  • Posts: 510
Re: CB77 Superhawk Build
« Reply #9 on: Jul 05, 2013, 17:48:48 »
superhawks are rad looking bikes straight from the factory.

i agree with you, like 97%.  There are several things that I think are iconic about them, specifically the tank and the tilted motor.  I'm trying to keep as much of the identity of the bike intact, just changing the ergonomics of it a bit.  I'm running clubmans instead of the stock flat drag bars, and i swapped out the seat, and i'm moving the pegs to the rear of three stock positions.  How cool is it that Honda thought about making foot controls with adjustable placement? why didn't they keep that on the later bikes.