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Recent Posts

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1
Restorations / Re: Dohc Cb750f: possibly a valve issue
« Last post by crazypj on Today at 18:29:16 »
Now youíve really got me thinking. The one thing that Iíve assumed is my wiring was good, due to the fact that itís so simple. Iíve got to rewire it anyway, so I might as well pull it all apart and have a look-see.

What is everyoneís recommendations on wiring a bike? Iíve got good tools for crimping and stripping, so I havenít been soldering my connections. Some say thatís fine, but my chopper friends say solder everything. After this experience, Iím thinking solder as much as possible and use less connectors. For example, solder and heat shrink as opposed to bullet connectors.


Sent from my iPhone using DO THE TON
Although I've used both (and still do) solder connections can fail due to vibration quicker than crimp connections. As long as wires are clean and crimped properly they are not an issue (plenty of 40+ ye old bikes still running original connectors)  It's easy enough to do a continuity check when bike is hot and cuts out  if removing cover 'cures' problem I would look specifically at the wires from trigger units to control box/coils. Also, check wire routing, I've seen cable clips bent so tight they cut wires and also (again on GS1000) wiring not in clips melted onto exhaust pipe but it only cut out above 80mph when airflow pushed wires onto pipe. At least that wasn't as bad as the GSX cutting out aat sustained 155mph., we ended up giving it back to Suzuki to fix
2
Trackers / Re: DT250 Tracker
« Last post by XS750AU on Today at 18:07:28 »
Quote
I have tried pressing the bolt out with M12 thread and a 12mm steel plate either side
Sometimes when you have the puller pressure applied, it just need a sharp hit with a hammer to get it moving.
3
Bob and Chop / Re: Project Ground Pounder -1981 Suzuki DR500
« Last post by Kanticoy on Today at 17:46:31 »
4
Loungin at da club / Re: Post a pic of your latest purchase
« Last post by CCRider on Today at 17:46:04 »
heavier bikes are more fun offroad than light ones anyways right? lol ;)
Ha Ha. Well my old ride isn't exactly light, just lower and slower.  ; )
5
Bob and Chop / Re: Project Ground Pounder -1981 Suzuki DR500
« Last post by Kanticoy on Today at 17:45:28 »
Leading links on a former dirtbike and not for sidecar use...
What a terrible idea. Go on, go on. Nobody said you're supposed to stopl :-P

Thatís the beauty of a bobber. It can be functional art. Theyíre much more interesting to look at than a standard fork!
6
Specials / CL350 Junker Wrenching
« Last post by MandoSteve on Today at 17:44:09 »
Yessir, I am wearing my respirator. I made some progress. I guess from all appearances I am going about things a little on the scattered side, but Iím definitely deliberate. I know how much I have to do in a day to be profitable and complete my work, and I know what I can do with the time I have left in a day to advance the fun things. So while I might not have time to pull off the rear swing arm, I might have time on that day to clean and paint the fork covers and also start on the front wheel. Part of this is a physical thing. Iím 42, so if I have a backache from laying on the ground working on a Toroís deck that hit weed- concealed bricks...well, you take a lesser evil that day so the shop stays open tomorrow.

Amazing the difference a little steel wheel makes on the wheels. I thought this front wheel was spent, but after some scrutiny I think it might be ok. The spokes have rust, but I can knock off some with steel wool and a wire brush on my drill should take care of much of it. I think a black center hub and spokes might be required. If I should need to replace the wheel down the line I will. I think I will match the front and back tire sizes. I suppose the Scrambler aspect of this bike was the reason for the larger front wheel...or maybe some other reason that escapes me at the moment. I ordered new bearings and those should be here a Saturday. I might paint the tank on Saturday or Sunday as well. I need to experiment with the compressor and sprayer I have and see what kind of results I get.

Amazing the damage done on the cap to this fork. Iíve checked online and canít seem to find a replacement without buying the fork. Maybe a grinder might touch it up? Not sure yet. The tires are long done but should be enough to stand it on while I work on some other things and try to decide what kind of tires are best. Forgot a pic of the fork sleeves, but there is always tomorrow.


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7
Bob and Chop / Re: Project Ground Pounder -1981 Suzuki DR500
« Last post by der_nanno on Today at 17:35:16 »
Leading links on a former dirtbike and not for sidecar use...
What a terrible idea. Go on, go on. Nobody said you're supposed to stopl :-P

8
Bob and Chop / Re: Project Ground Pounder -1981 Suzuki DR500
« Last post by Sonreir on Today at 16:43:36 »
Tidy.
9
You need a certain amount of cylinder pressure to ensure your engine runs. That cylinder pressure is usually provided by the burning of the fuel/air mix (hot gases expand and that expansion is what provides you with usable power). The reason the spark fires before top dead center is that it takes a little while (split second, but still a consideration) for the fuel to burn inside the cylinder. This is called flame propagation. So after the spark fires, there's a small delay before cylinder pressures build. Ideally, peak cylinder pressure is at around 14į ATDC. If it comes in later than that, you're losing power.

Anyway... the point I was coming around to making is that the pressure in the cylinder that comes from the expanding gases from burning the fuel works in conjunction with the compression already provided by the rising piston. So if you start with low compression, then you're still lower than you need to be during the flame propagation period. You can get an engine with poor compression to run by advancing the timing and causing the spark to fire sooner. This gives the flame more time to propagate while the piston is still rising and creates enough total compression in the cylinder to keep the engine running.
10
Bob and Chop / Project Ground Pounder -1981 Suzuki DR500
« Last post by Kanticoy on Today at 16:35:43 »
Been in in the shop for a while this morning. I finalized the tank mounts to get the tank to sit where I wanted it to. The top curve of the tank is now identical to the angle of the top tube. Should allow it to flow into the hard tail just fine. Machined up a new puck rod and welded it in:







Since I knew I was going to be upgrading to a modern front wheel I had to make it work with the forks. Iíll be using a wheel off of a 2007 KX250f because I picked up a massive 320mm supermoto rotor for that wheel for cheap at the swap meet brand new. The newer wheel uses a 20mm front axle. I also wanted to kick out the fork ends 1.5Ē to add a little more clearance for the caliper when I get to that point. The original axle for these forks is 14mm so I got creative. Machined up some new axle drop outs out of cold rolled steel and bored the inside to 20mm:



Next I cut of the ends of the forks with the portaband. Machined a slug out of tubing and cut another piece of tubing to integrate with the drop outs. I used the mill and fishmouthed the ends to suit.



I aligned the fishmouthed ends and TIG welded it all together:







It will integrate with the new drop outs like so:





I will finish weld it all together once I get all of the wheel parts and axle in so I can center it all up correctly. Should work just fine!
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