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Author Topic: 1972 DS7 The Row Boat  (Read 60673 times)

Offline VonYinzer

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Re: 1972 DS7 The Long Road
« Reply #50 on: Mar 30, 2013, 15:33:14 »
Awesome. Now get to work!
Like a river that don't know where it's flowin'
I took a wrong turn and just kept goin'

Offline Swagger

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Re: 1972 DS7 The Long Road
« Reply #51 on: Mar 30, 2013, 19:41:53 »
Glad it came together!
.....there's no way that little rice cooker is going 100m/h when the work need to get up to those speeds includes a big fuck off fairing shaped like a giant cock. ~Staffy

Weiner tetanus is nothing to scoff at. ~JustinLonghorn

Offline clem

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Re: 1972 DS7 The Long Road
« Reply #52 on: Apr 21, 2013, 21:25:50 »
Finally I've got a couple of updates. I did order a new petcock to locate the tank mounting position, got the axle turned down and the stem swapped out. I also got the rear master cylinder/caliper all hooked up along with a few misc. oem parts for the rear wheel. Oh and vortex clip-ons too.
Here is the DS7 stem pressed into the 2001 zx-6E lower triple. Note that the lower portion of the DS7 stem had to be turned down to press fit into the new triple. Bearing size on the DS7 was 30mm I.D. while the ZX-6E was 28mm I.D.

The top portion of the DS7 stem had to be turned down also to fit the upper triple clamp right above the second set of threads.



The front axle was turned down to 15mm for the EX250 wheels and we included the spacer in the axle.


The right side was a collar so we remade a new collar to accept the turned down axle and also included a spacer in the collar.



The front axle:

Next up is to decide on a mono shock or add dual mounts on the swinger. Any thoughts on that one?
« Last Edit: Apr 21, 2013, 21:29:24 by clem »
"After every war there are soldiers who refuse to surrender. To this day there are still thousands who cling to their 30+ year old motorcycles, thinking that the war is still on, refusing to concede that the four-strokes have won"

1972 DS7 http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=45886.msg505995#msg505995
1983 CB550sc bobber http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=30599.30

Offline bradj

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Re: 1972 DS7 The Long Road
« Reply #53 on: Apr 22, 2013, 01:56:18 »
Well this old girl came a long way I recal a rusted to fuck picture you posted in the thing I just bought thread, now look at cha. I love it

Offline clem

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Re: 1972 DS7 The Long Road
« Reply #54 on: Apr 22, 2013, 06:33:57 »
Well this old girl came a long way I recal a rusted to fuck picture you posted in the thing I just bought thread, now look at cha. I love it
It was so rusted that the rusty things just started falling off. It kinda reminded me of one of those titanic artifacs. I wouldn't doubt for a minute that since it came from new orleans that it didn't spend a day or two under water for hurricane katrina.
"After every war there are soldiers who refuse to surrender. To this day there are still thousands who cling to their 30+ year old motorcycles, thinking that the war is still on, refusing to concede that the four-strokes have won"

1972 DS7 http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=45886.msg505995#msg505995
1983 CB550sc bobber http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=30599.30

Offline clem

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Re: 1972 DS7 The Long Road
« Reply #55 on: Jun 15, 2013, 00:52:56 »
I've been out of pocket for about a month working 13 hours a day 7 days a week but I guess it's cool because I have some extra dough for the bike.
I removed the engine and tore it down. It was full of milky oil in there! Nothing internal was rusted up to badly despite water intrusion into the engine. The cylinders appear to be okay and you can still see the hone marks on the wall. I didn't check the I.D. on them yet though. I finally got it to shift through the gears once I found out that the shift forks were stuck to their shafts. So next week I'm going to send the crank to Lyn Garland to go through(whether it needs it or not). I figured since I have it this far down that I should just get it done. Got the wheels back from the powder coater and they look cool. I'll put up some picks of them once the tires go on. Oh and I have a GSXR600 shock for the back end ;)

« Last Edit: Jun 15, 2013, 00:54:47 by clem »
"After every war there are soldiers who refuse to surrender. To this day there are still thousands who cling to their 30+ year old motorcycles, thinking that the war is still on, refusing to concede that the four-strokes have won"

1972 DS7 http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=45886.msg505995#msg505995
1983 CB550sc bobber http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=30599.30

Offline clem

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Re: 1972 DS7 The Long Road
« Reply #56 on: Jun 23, 2013, 00:10:23 »
Sent the crank out Friday to get rebuilt and I've been degreasing and blasting bit's and pieces here and there. I got some prices on tires and ouch! it isn't cheap. Seems like the hardest part with this build for me is control. I originally was going to just get new fork tubes. Then I said what the heck, I should just get new forks and save a few bucks LOL! The next step was when Swagger posted up some nice wheels for sale. I thought to myself and again pulled the trigger. Well then the back wheel is to wide for the stock swing arm so I thought again and bought the proper swing arm for the wheels. When I got the swing arm in the paint was so good on it that I said, " I can't mess up that finish, plus I'll save a few bucks not having to paint it after I would add the dual shock mounts". Next step, buy a mono shock. Now I'm finding myself wanting to graft a newer style rear cowl on it from maybe a early to mid 90's sport bike to blend a little old with new.
Question: When will this stop?
I still would like to fit in an electronic ignition and some stainless JL pipes but at this rate that may get tough.
"After every war there are soldiers who refuse to surrender. To this day there are still thousands who cling to their 30+ year old motorcycles, thinking that the war is still on, refusing to concede that the four-strokes have won"

1972 DS7 http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=45886.msg505995#msg505995
1983 CB550sc bobber http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=30599.30

Online stroker crazy

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Re: 1972 DS7 The Long Road
« Reply #57 on: Jun 23, 2013, 00:58:02 »

Question: When will this stop?


When you run out of money or patience!

Crazy
“Ride like the Wind” W.H.

Offline clem

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Re: 1972 DS7 The Long Road
« Reply #58 on: Jun 23, 2013, 20:44:08 »
Quick question on the  needle bearing for the shift drum, is it just press fitted? Not to clear in the manual that I have. Thanks
"After every war there are soldiers who refuse to surrender. To this day there are still thousands who cling to their 30+ year old motorcycles, thinking that the war is still on, refusing to concede that the four-strokes have won"

1972 DS7 http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=45886.msg505995#msg505995
1983 CB550sc bobber http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=30599.30

Offline clem

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Re: 1972 DS7 The Long Road
« Reply #59 on: Jun 30, 2013, 19:30:04 »
Inching along this weekend. I burnt up my band saw and angle grinder but managed to get a little done on the rear end.
I bought some 1-1/2" x 2" tubing to make the upper shock mount. I still need to figure out the exact position of this support, right now it can rotate up or down a few millimeters.


I did make one of the lower linkage brackets but this was about the time that things were literally falling apart. Porta bands are expensive, so to keep this rolling right now I may go pick one up at harbor freight this week and save some cash for bike parts. When I get the saw, I'll make two new brackets. This one can now be considered a test piece.

It wasn't cool when this came flying off at me, don't know how I didn't get hurt.

So now I have this, I can see the light at the end of the tunnel but it's very dim. Once I get the crank done and paid for I'll be buying some new tires and check the ride height before the shock mounts get welded out. Enjoy the week fella's!
« Last Edit: Jun 30, 2013, 19:33:01 by clem »
"After every war there are soldiers who refuse to surrender. To this day there are still thousands who cling to their 30+ year old motorcycles, thinking that the war is still on, refusing to concede that the four-strokes have won"

1972 DS7 http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=45886.msg505995#msg505995
1983 CB550sc bobber http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=30599.30