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Author Topic: Welding Gas Tanks  (Read 4026 times)

Online HURCO550

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Re: Welding Gas Tanks
« Reply #40 on: Aug 15, 2017, 09:36:58 »
+1. I have one of those henrob torches and they truly are much more capable than a regular oxy acetylene torch. I don't use it much as I have access to a few tig machines, but given the right amount of practice you can weld even some fairly thin aluminum alloy with one.

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Offline Popeye SXM

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Re: Welding Gas Tanks
« Reply #41 on: Aug 15, 2017, 10:30:07 »
I have just successfully de-seamed the back of my tank with oxy acetylene. There is less heat than Tig but you do heat a bigger area so there can be more heat distortion. I did small runs. It is not difficult to learn, as always start on some scrap with the smallest flame you can to melt the rod. I found it was best to concentrate the flame directly on the rod. Oxy acet welding used to be very popular for welding thin metal before Tig became affordable

Offline datadavid

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Re: Welding Gas Tanks
« Reply #42 on: Aug 15, 2017, 10:31:05 »
Looks like I should invest some time and learn how to oxy weld. The Dillion runs on only 4psi for both the oxy and acetylene, just hope the regulators can be reliable at such low pressure.
Given my current lack of welding skill, I will be getting my mate to tig weld up the headers on the XS896.
I turn the flame down to a very low flow for welding thin wall, regulators seem very capable on normal setups.

Offline crazypj

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Re: Welding Gas Tanks
« Reply #43 on: Aug 17, 2017, 13:29:36 »
A decent two stage regulator works at very low pressures but te majority are single stage and somewhat hit or miss when initially setting up for miniature torches. Once set they seem OK though. There is now a Chinese version of te jewelry torch, seems too cheap to work. I managed to get old of mini torch for just less than $100. It's real easy to use on very thin material. One big advantage of gas welding is you can burn off contaminants when doing a lot of projects using old/recycled parts (at least on steel) I've welded broken brass antique pieces together using full size torch and Oxy/DA, all you need is practice (welding every day at the time so it seemed easy)
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Offline XS750AU

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Re: Welding Gas Tanks
« Reply #44 on: Aug 17, 2017, 19:35:11 »
Ryan sorry to hijack your post.  ;)
It looks like there are a lot of positive opinions on oxy/acetylene.
The other benefit I see with oxy/acetylene is all the other uses in the shop. Unfreezing rusted bolts, solder, brazing, heat treating alloys, annealing etc.
From your experiences is it easier to learn TIG or oxy welding?
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Offline der_nanno

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Re: Welding Gas Tanks
« Reply #45 on: Aug 18, 2017, 07:43:45 »
From your experiences is it easier to learn TIG or oxy welding?

I found TIG to be easier, as you can simply adjust the amperage if you need more/less heat and be done with it. That being said, I had a few pretty decent people to show me the ropes with TIG and not a single good one with oxy. With the processes being rather similar, if you grasped the basic concept of how to TIG, oxy is pretty close, you just don't have amperage to play with, but nozzle sizes and hotter and colder or softer and harder flames.

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Offline DesmoDog

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Re: Welding Gas Tanks
« Reply #46 on: Aug 19, 2017, 10:23:52 »
I've wanted a TIG set up for years but could never justify the cost. Now that I can afford one, I'm so used to use an Oxy/acetylene set up I still always decide to spend the money on parts or projects instead...

I started out with an old torch set I inherited from my dad, and took a class at the local community college/vo-tech to learn how to use it. I still use my dad's set up except I replaced the torch with a Meco Midget right after taking the class. Plus the hoses, when I got the lighter torch I bought lightweight hoses too. And a better set of eyewear/lens. And of course I replaced the tanks when they ran out. And recently I had to replace the regulators. So while I still call it my dad's set the only thing's left of his are the cart and the sparker doohickey.

As torches go I really like the Midget. It was pretty inexpensive and TinmanTech has all the tips and other bits for it. I've used it mainly on thin stuff or for brazing but one of it's most recent uses has been welding up a Model A frame. It worked fine for that. I think they say you can go up to 1/4" thick with it but that's not really where it shines. 1/8" and less seems to be the sweet spot for it to me.

It's already been mentioned but having an O/A set up around for other things is handy. Until this car project I probably used my torch for things other than welding at least as much as I welded with it. Heating kickstart levers to reshape them, brazing up leaky tanks, that sort of thing. Even if I had a TIG I'd still keep the torch around.

I find welding with it to be relaxing even. Get the set up right and there's kind of a zone you get into with the flame and the filler rod. (Sometimes getting the set up right is frustrating though, but thats all part of it, isn't it?) The very little bit of TIG welding I've done is similar I suppose but there's something about working on 80+ year old stuff with a flame that seems right to me.

And having said all of that, the main reason I still want a TIG is to weld up stainless exhaust systems. I STILL shop for a TIG set up a few times a year!

Offline crazypj

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Re: Welding Gas Tanks
« Reply #47 on: Aug 30, 2017, 22:03:18 »
I've wanted a TIG set up for years but could never justify the cost. Now that I can afford one, I'm so used to use an Oxy/acetylene set up I still always decide to spend the money on parts or projects instead...


As torches go I really like the Midget. It was pretty inexpensive and TinmanTech has all the tips and other bits for it. I've used it mainly on thin stuff or for brazing but one of it's most recent uses has been welding up a Model A frame. It worked fine for that. I think they say you can go up to 1/4" thick with it but that's not really where it shines. 1/8" and less seems to be the sweet spot for it to me.

It's already been mentioned but having an O/A set up around for other things is handy. Until this car project I probably used my torch for things other than welding at least as much as I welded with it. Heating kickstart levers to reshape them, brazing up leaky tanks, that sort of thing. Even if I had a TIG I'd still keep the torch around.

I find welding with it to be relaxing even. Get the set up right and there's kind of a zone you get into with the flame and the filler rod. (Sometimes getting the set up right is frustrating though, but thats all part of it, isn't it?) The very little bit of TIG welding I've done is similar I suppose but there's something about working on 80+ year old stuff with a flame that seems right to me.

And having said all of that, the main reason I still want a TIG is to weld up stainless exhaust systems. I STILL shop for a TIG set up a few times a year!


One thing no one has mentioned about Oxy/DA is you really 'should' make sure everything is clean but it's dead easy to weld dirty oily steel and 'float out' contaminants if needed.Te learning curve welding steel isn't very steep, hardest part is deciding on nozzle size and flame set up. You can even 'melt the rod then use the 'blob'  into surrounding steel (as someone mentioned) Even though it's 'wrong'  it can still work,just run torch over everything to flow material. Oxy is OK down to 0.020"  if you have 0 tip. With a mini/jewelers torch you could weld feeler gauges together (I haven't had enough practice to go less than 0.010" though) When I was welding every day I could (and did) use 'stick'  to weld up a Honda mudguards and equally thin stuff (have to move real fast so you don't burn through using 1/16" rod at 20Amps)
'you can take my word for it or argue until you find out I'm right'
I gave my girlfriend an orgasm the other night, but, she spat it back at me
 Some humans would do anything to see if it was possible to do it. If you put a large switch in some cave somewhere, with a sign on it saying 'End-of-the-World Switch. PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH', the paint wouldn't even have time to dry
 It’s not worth doing something unless someone, somewhere, would much rather you weren’t doing it  (Terry Pratchett)
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Offline Ryan Stecken

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Re: Welding Gas Tanks
« Reply #48 on: Sep 05, 2017, 13:25:48 »
Tu put it into a nutshell...

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Offline doc_rot

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Re: Welding Gas Tanks
« Reply #49 on: Sep 07, 2017, 15:01:20 »
^ LOL. my sentiments exactly
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