collapse

www.dimecitycycles.com


www.restocycle.com

www.CITYLIMITMOTO.com

www.jadusmotorcycleparts.com

www.bisonmotorsports.com

www.speedmotoco.com

www.cognitomoto.com

www.townmoto.com

www.sparckmoto.com

www.Moto-Madness.com

www.pistonsociety.com

www.steeltowngarage.com


Author Topic: 1979 Moto Guzzi V50 II Cafe  (Read 180634 times)

Offline Dale

  • Posts: 680
    • [B]Moto Guzzi V50II Detailed Cafe Build Diary [/B]
Re: Re: Moto Guzzi V50II Detailed Cafe Build Diary
« Reply #30 on: Jan 21, 2011, 03:55:21 »
Hey BigBSBusa, thanks for dropping in here. :-) Enjoy the break! :-)


I understand they're a better braking material than stainless, but the down side is the surface rust.

I wasn't aware of that. The stainless ones I found have cross drilling. Wonder if that would compensate, and give me similar performance to what the standard irons are? Dunno? I'm not an expert on discs.

And you know, I think youre right, just keep the current discs - they *work*, and in the future, if it really bothers me I can always swop out. The rust is part of the "personality" and quirks of an older bike anyway.

Thanks for the info Ian.

Offline jackstraw650

  • Posts: 157
Re: Re: Moto Guzzi V50II Detailed Cafe Build Diary
« Reply #31 on: Jan 22, 2011, 10:26:02 »
Dale, love your little MG!  You have done an outstanding job.  Can't wait to see how it finishes up.  Cast iron is generally considered to be a much better rotor material than stainless steel.  Supposedly the iron comes up to optimum functioning temperature much quicker than SS and then throws off the excess heat quicker, too.  The reason that the bike manufacturers have gone almost exclusively to SS is basically an aesthetic marketing decision.  They didn't want to hear "what's wrong with my brakes......they are rusting away!"  Coupled with trying to settle a bunch of ridiculous warranty claims, they just bit the bullet and used the SS rotors.
 I do have a question about your bike.......bear with me 'cause I have no idea how you are planning on finishing out the rear wheel area.  Are you planning on running some kind of rear fender?  It would seem that with your current set up, the back of your engine and drive unit would end up being sprayed with water and various damaging road crud.  It would be a shame for that to mess up all the hard work you have done.  Have you considered extending the seat pan about 6 inches and maybe making something like the "tidy tails" you see on modern sport bikes?  Just a thought!
"It takes dynamite to give me a rush....too much of anything is just enough!".......Grateful Dead..."I Need A Miracle"


Support Your Site!  If you can afford it....Kick up the 10 bucks, dammit!!

Offline 50gary

  • Posts: 585
  • Under the Limelight
Re: Re: Moto Guzzi V50II Detailed Cafe Build Diary
« Reply #32 on: Jan 22, 2011, 13:34:01 »
I'd keep the iron rotors as well.  Better braking and they're the original.  To the 'cognoscenti' it's a mark of coolness.  People who know will know they're iron and not simply neglected.  It's like riding Tubulars on a race bicycle, the right people know what they're looking at.  I wouild also cross drill them, better initial bite, better outgassing, slightly lighter, (rotating mass) very cool look.  Do not chamfer the holes de-burr only.
  Cheers, 50gary
« Last Edit: Jan 22, 2011, 19:37:54 by 50gary »
Short track speedskating, cycling, guitars, motorcycles, juggling dynamite. I was born to laugh at Tornadoes.

Offline Rocan

  • Posts: 4874
  • "Long after I rest, my steel will live on"
Re: Re: Moto Guzzi V50II Detailed Cafe Build Diary
« Reply #33 on: Jan 22, 2011, 18:49:48 »
i agree. i would run iron. since those rotors dont float, i would thing that with that amount of offset the stainless would be VERY susceptible to warping.


or, what i would realllyyy do, is get some alloy spacers machined and mount whatever modern rotor thats of the same diameter to that. would be lighter, brake WAY better, look better (in my opinion) and last a lot longer. probably be just as pricy as the stainless rotors.
PJ- Cafe's don't really work right until you get rolling 70mph +

Honda CB350 Project- www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=8643.0

Honda C100 Restoration- www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=38653.0

Offline Dale

  • Posts: 680
    • [B]Moto Guzzi V50II Detailed Cafe Build Diary [/B]
Re: Re: Moto Guzzi V50II Detailed Cafe Build Diary
« Reply #34 on: Jan 23, 2011, 12:31:13 »
Thanks guys for the thoughts and info on the discs. Ive leaned a whole bunch just by you guys giving me feedback. Thats what makes forums like this great.
 
First and foremost is functionality, and the fact that the irons are best for the job seals it. Taking the next step, as you say 50gary by cross drilling pushes the effectiveness even further, not to mention making it cooler (in both ways :-). Good to know on the burring.
 
Rocan, sure, that is a solution, and a smart one, but the amount of work, costs and specialised tools required to fasten and float the discs would be overkill for my build.
 
jackstra650, thanks alot. Appreciate the explanation.

I do have a question about your bike.......bear with me 'cause I have no idea how you are planning on finishing out the rear wheel area.  Are you planning on running some kind of rear fender?  It would seem that with your current set up, the back of your engine and drive unit would end up being sprayed with water and various damaging road crud.  It would be a shame for that to mess up all the hard work you have done.  Have you considered extending the seat pan about 6 inches and maybe making something like the "tidy tails" you see on modern sport bikes?  Just a thought!

The idea is to put an aluminium plate directly onto the frame along the two sidecover struts, and take it down as far as possible. I would have to check once the bike was mocked up whether I would have to panel beat a buldge into the plate to compensate for when the rear shocks are at full compression, and how close the tyre gets to the plate. As for shifting the seat back, the line of flinging debris off the wheel will definitely be taken into account. I'm a bit of a sucker for the rear wheel sticking out as much as possible, but the practical placement of stuff will dictate to a large degree where it will go, and as you say, if the seat is further back, it helps with the number plate placement and angle...

[Edit] > Oh, and of course, the length of the seat would have to accommodate the rider, and the concept may not be in line with that... Ill only know when I get to that point.

« Last Edit: Jan 24, 2011, 03:23:56 by Dale »

Offline Dale

  • Posts: 680
    • [B]Moto Guzzi V50II Detailed Cafe Build Diary [/B]
Re: MOTO GUZZI V50II Detailed Cafe Build Diary
« Reply #35 on: Jan 24, 2011, 05:21:06 »
( 10_Exhaust )

Thought about whether I wanted the exhaust matt or shiny for about 5 seconds.

The powder coating guy showed me this black powder coating which can withstand temperatures up to 800 deg Celsius.

The Exhaust cones are not the prettiest, but I kinda liked the neutrality of the shape, and I want to prioritize spend on other areas.

That, and they are made from Stainless Steel.

When I opened them up I was surprised to see that each muffler was of a different design. The one was shorter than the other, the shorter one being open on the one end. I can categorically state that they haven't been modified, and the pop rivet holding them in the cone looked factory.


Does anyone have any knowledge around this?


I have never seen such restricted units. It baffles me that they can actually expel air at all! Spoke to a friend of a friend who builds racing exhausts for a living. Showed them to him, and he suggested the best thing to do would be to drill 12mm holes into the mufflers. "No bigger - 12mm is perfect" he said.
Turns out, he had one of these V50's when he was younger. Again - had great things to say about the bike and its handling.

So I drilled the holes - Damn! The material had hardened. Cutting oil all the way.




The lower exhaust clamps were in a bit of a state, not un-fixable, but I found these great stainless steel clamps.




The header spacers were pretty rusted up, but I got them looking better than expected with a copper brush.




New gaskets :-)







Offline Dale

  • Posts: 680
    • [B]Moto Guzzi V50II Detailed Cafe Build Diary [/B]
Re: MOTO GUZZI V50II Detailed Cafe Build Diary
« Reply #36 on: Jan 24, 2011, 09:22:53 »
( 11_Intake )

This motorcycle has a massive air box. The two carburetors feed into a chamber via a set of very angled intake manifolds. This chamber then has a big plastic tubular structure which houses a long cylindrical filter. Breather pipes from the cylinder also feed into it along with an oil recovery pipe from the sump.






Now, I want the bike to:

1. Breathe better.
2. Have a more straightened out intake manifold for performance reasons.
3. Have as little bulky equipment in the engine area as possible.
4. Have as much clear space in the side panel area.


Right now it has:

1. Fairly restrictive breathing.
2. Very curved intake manifolds.
3. A huge air filter box that fills up the space between the engine, tank and battery compartment, making up a large amount of space.
4. A massive battery taking up the entire side panel area.




So may plan is two phased. ( I think ).

Phase 1.
- Get rid of the air box, and fit conical air filters directly to the carburetors.
- Make up a smaller version of the air box to service the oil recovery and breather pipes. Oil from the engine needs to come up, settle, and drain back. Breather pipes need to be filtered.

So this is what Iím thinking right now:
Let me know if this is not sound.









Phase 2.
- Fabricate straightened out intake manifolds.
- Move the battery forward and out of the way, creating a nice cavity where the side panels used to be.






The objective is to achieve this:





Please let me know what you guys think, and whether this is a good solution, or I'm missing something here... :-)
« Last Edit: Jan 24, 2011, 10:31:08 by Dale »

Offline motofiaccone

  • Posts: 1946
Re: MOTO GUZZI V50II Detailed Cafe Build Diary
« Reply #37 on: Jan 24, 2011, 10:14:56 »
I love it!

Offline Slice

  • Posts: 335
    • ThePersian.com
Re: MOTO GUZZI V50II Detailed Cafe Build Diary
« Reply #38 on: Jan 24, 2011, 10:49:01 »
Yep - This project is as suspected.... wicked!
The difference between a 'bike builder' and a 'parts collector' is a fine line.
 
1966 Honda 305 Dream: http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=18950.80

1977 Honda CB550K: http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=26058

BLOG: www.thepersian.com

Offline 50gary

  • Posts: 585
  • Under the Limelight
Re: MOTO GUZZI V50II Detailed Cafe Build Diary
« Reply #39 on: Jan 24, 2011, 11:16:56 »
I would not take out one air box then go through the trouble of making a smaller one.  I would also look into buying a (I know they're costly) a lithium battery, they are compact, lighter by almost half and yet powerful. This gives up valuable real estate in a crowded area.  Just a note, the different muffler packing had you "baffled" pun intended?  I wonder if there might be a curved and contoured inner fender that could be adapted between the rear tire and the engine area?  On my CX500 cafe project I used the existing plastic inner fender and cut it down it worked well and didn't show.  Great bike and I like your style.  Before I forget, I highly recommend Race Tech fork emulators, they will transform your front end.
     Cheers, 50gary
Short track speedskating, cycling, guitars, motorcycles, juggling dynamite. I was born to laugh at Tornadoes.