collapse

www.dimecitycycles.com


www.restocycle.com

www.CITYLIMITMOTO.com

www.jadusmotorcycleparts.com

www.bisonmotorsports.com

www.speedmotoco.com

www.cognitomoto.com

www.townmoto.com

www.sparckmoto.com

www.Moto-Madness.com

www.pistonsociety.com

QUESTIONS ABOUT THE SITE? TROUBLE REGISTERING? ADMIN@DOTHETON.COM

Author Topic: 72 CB350 For the Daughter  (Read 16373 times)

Offline Harsh

  • Posts: 170
Re: 72 CB350 For the Daughter
« Reply #15 on: Sep 10, 2016, 11:03:51 »
Dreams...my dreams last night annoyed me.  I am sure you are sitting on the edge of your seat wondering what they were about.  Well let me tell you.



Wiring diagrams...damned wiring diagrams.

If I don't figure that crap out soon I fear I may go insane.
2014 Triumph Tiger
2007 Triumph Daytona 675 - Track Bike
1974 Honda CB750 Cafe
1972 (x2) Honda CB350

Offline Harsh

  • Posts: 170
Re: 72 CB350 For the Daughter
« Reply #16 on: Sep 14, 2016, 21:16:42 »
I think I figured out my wiring woes.

Looking at most of the solutions to modify a stock reflector to accept an H4 bulb only one was acceptable to me.  While nicely done, that one still didnít look as simple as what I had in my head.  So here we are.  My idea will allow you to easily swap bulbs without having to undo copious amounts of safety wire and will leave you with a nice looking application.

I had a couple of spare headlights from previous builds that used H4 bulbs.  I got to thinking how were the mounts connected to the glass.  Well, there are just a few pressed in tabs that keep the parts together.  Before you remove the mount make sure you notate which direction is up on it.  You can easily press the tabs out and remove the mount.  Once done you now have a solid foundation for an H4 bulb.  If you donít have any spare lights I suggest going to a junk yard or your local auto parts store and pick up the cheapest light you can find that uses an H4 bulb.

My donor light.  I think it came from my CB750.  In the second pic you can see where the tabs were pushed out to remove the mount.




You donít need to worry about getting super close to the base because you are going to drill a bigger hole in it later.  The only reason I even removed the oem bulb was so that the hole saw wouldnít bottom out on it.  I have noticed a difference in diameter between the two mounts I have so whatever you have might be different as well.  Donít worry, it isnít a big deal as it is only important because it will dictate how big a hole you drill.  I suggest a drill press with a hole saw designed for cutting glass or ceramics.  It will bounce around less on the metal.  If you donít have a drill press recruit someone to help hold the headlight in place.  Use the rubber dust shield for the H4 bulb under the glass to help protect it and provide a somewhat stable base.  Get the hole saw centered over the hole that is left from the removal of the bulb.  Go slowly and keep the metal of the reflector cool.  If it gets hot it WILL cause the reflection material on the inside to bubble up.  Not a total loss if it does, but not perfect either.  Now due to hole saws not coming in every size imaginable size you may have to do a bit of trimming to the hole you just cut.  Go slowly as you only want the hole to be a tiny bit bigger than the mount.

Tab, this one had three of them.


Mount removed.



Bulb cut out.



Once you have the hole drilled, using emery cloth, a file, or whatever rough up couple an inch or so of the metal housing around the outside new hole.  You want to do this so whatever you choose to adhere the mount with will have some tooth to grab onto.  You will also want to remove any sharp edges from the newly cut hole.  More on that later.  After roughing up the area make sure to clean it thoroughly.  Now would be a great time to clean out the inside of the headlight as well.  Shake out any loose stuff that may have fallen inside.  I then take a rag with some denatured alcohol to wipe out the inside thoroughly.  Do not scrub too much against the reflector part you can remove it if you do.  If you didnít heed my advice about removing the sharp edges your fingers are probable cut up right about now.

Hole drilled and sanded.



I will say upfront that having to stop and take pictures during this stage greatly impacted my final product.  The two part putty starts to get hard quickly.  Because of that I wasnít able to get it as smooth as I would have liked.

I chose to use some two-part putty because it is more controllable than mixing some JB Weld or other epoxy.  You can get it in the plumbing section of just about any hardware store.  Make a nice ring around your hole.  Ensure you have the mount oriented correctly then press it into place.  Once pressed in, keeping pressure on it, stick your finger on the inside and smooth out whatever putty has oozed through.  You may and hopefully will have some putty come through the holes from the tabs that originally attached the mount to the reflector housing.  That is good as long as it doesnít impede bulb installation it will actually work to your advantage in helping to hold the mount onto the reflector housing.  Trim away any excess putty on the outside leaving a little bit to blend/feather it to the mount.  I keep pressure on it for a few minutes until I am satisfied it isnít going to move anymore.



Putty in place.  I did push it a little bit over the edge before pushing in the mount.


Smooth out the putty.


Putty trimmed.  You can see it oozing through the original mount hole where the tab was.



You should now have a good looking and solid H4 bulb mount.

« Last Edit: Sep 14, 2016, 21:18:31 by Harsh »
2014 Triumph Tiger
2007 Triumph Daytona 675 - Track Bike
1974 Honda CB750 Cafe
1972 (x2) Honda CB350

Offline Maritime

  • DTT SUPPORTER
  • *
  • Posts: 8664
Re: 72 CB350 For the Daughter
« Reply #17 on: Sep 15, 2016, 08:44:04 »
Nice job.
The GL Rebirth: http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=68337.0
CX500 Low budget Bobber : http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=43617.0
"Beer makes you feel the way you ought to feel without beer" -Henry Lawson
"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." - Thomas Jefferson

Offline Harsh

  • Posts: 170
Re: 72 CB350 For the Daughter
« Reply #18 on: Sep 15, 2016, 19:37:23 »
Did a little mocking up and frame de-tabbing.  The seat isn't as wide at the front as I had hoped so the rear seam of the tank is going to show and a bit more of the frame than I wanted.

The rear frame hump has to go.  I was hoping I would be able to keep it, but it just won't work with it there.






After cutting off the hoop, seat hinge points, and helmet hook.  I still need to cut off the seat latch, but it wasn't in my way for what I was doing today.






The rear of the seat hits the frame.






Thinking about adding a brace across the shock mount points.  It will also give me a place to attach some brackets to mount the rear of the seat and a place to attach the part of the fender.  Every thing in green tape I am thinking about cutting off.

2014 Triumph Tiger
2007 Triumph Daytona 675 - Track Bike
1974 Honda CB750 Cafe
1972 (x2) Honda CB350

Offline Harsh

  • Posts: 170
Re: 72 CB350 For the Daughter
« Reply #19 on: Sep 15, 2016, 20:39:17 »
I was looking at the pic with the seat and thought that instead of cutting the frame straight down that if I were to cut it at an angle to match the seat it would look good.
2014 Triumph Tiger
2007 Triumph Daytona 675 - Track Bike
1974 Honda CB750 Cafe
1972 (x2) Honda CB350

Offline Harsh

  • Posts: 170
Re: 72 CB350 For the Daughter
« Reply #20 on: Sep 17, 2016, 17:45:20 »
Alright I have to send out a huge thank you to Cal on the SOHC4 forum.  He bead blasted a bunch of parts for me.  His kindness simply amazes me.  After some thorough cleaning I should be able to start on getting the engine painted and put back together.

So now that I have the bead blasted parts back I was able to attach the rear fender in its correct location to get a good look at how things will sit.  I think (fingers crossed) things are going to work out.  The cross brace as I originally had it wouldn't work because the fender made contact with it.  However, if I put it at an angle complimentary to the fender it will not only act as a brace, but a place to attach the fender to.  I put the seat on and traced along it where the seat would be.  It looks like I will be able to provide a lot more protection under the seat that I previously thought.  I was originally going to cut it at the seam.  Another added benefit of extending the fender under the seat is that it will provide me a place to attach a bracket for the tail light and license plate.  Cutting/grinding off the upper lip on the frame will allow me a place to weld on some tabs to attach the rear of the seat to.

2014 Triumph Tiger
2007 Triumph Daytona 675 - Track Bike
1974 Honda CB750 Cafe
1972 (x2) Honda CB350

Offline Harsh

  • Posts: 170
Re: 72 CB350 For the Daughter
« Reply #21 on: Sep 26, 2016, 18:48:46 »
I got my rotor back today from being surfaced and having holes drilled in it.  Tom at TrueDisk did an amazing job.




And of course a quick mock up of the front end.  I have a buddy that woks in the R&D machine shop at Chrysler.  He milled out the pockets in the stock triple to accept the clipon brackets.  He also made me a bracket for the gauges and added a bit of flare to it.  I can't begin to tell you how happy I am at how awesome this is.







« Last Edit: Sep 27, 2016, 14:18:34 by Harsh »
2014 Triumph Tiger
2007 Triumph Daytona 675 - Track Bike
1974 Honda CB750 Cafe
1972 (x2) Honda CB350

Offline Maritime

  • DTT SUPPORTER
  • *
  • Posts: 8664
Re: 72 CB350 For the Daughter
« Reply #22 on: Sep 27, 2016, 13:57:20 »
Nice bit o kit there.
The GL Rebirth: http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=68337.0
CX500 Low budget Bobber : http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=43617.0
"Beer makes you feel the way you ought to feel without beer" -Henry Lawson
"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." - Thomas Jefferson

Offline Harsh

  • Posts: 170
Re: 72 CB350 For the Daughter
« Reply #23 on: Sep 30, 2016, 19:26:41 »
So I have run into a bit of an issue.  I picked up some steel to weld in to brace the rear of the frame and secure the front of the seat.  Lets start with the front.  In previous mock ups I didn't have the rubber piece on that holds down the rear of the tank in place.  Even without it in place the front of the seat was sat a little high.  Noticed it was sitting on the hooks that the strap that holds the battery down attach to, so those had to go.  Then it was sitting on a rolled edge at the front.  The opposite side of the frame didn't have it so off it went.  That is when I noticed it sitting on the rubber piece.

So this is my thought.  I can cut off the bracket that secures the rear of the tank and weld in a flat piece of stock.  That will drop the tank almost an inch.  In order to secure it I could weld in a bolt or a flanged pin with a hole in the shank to insert a cotter pin.  Of course the flat piece of stock would have some rubber on it for some soak up some of the vibration.  I understand this would impact the fuel getting into the petcock, but I think it would only change or be an issue at low levels.  I don't think it will impact anything else though.  The crossover tube and fuel lines as they come out of the petcock would be close the the carbs, but looking at the wife's bike they should clear.





A little blurry, but you get it


Cut that off and weld in a flat piece in its place across the frame.




Now the rear brace isn't going where I had hoped.  It needs to be closer to the hole.  Where it is at I don't see it adding any cross support strength.  All it would do is be a place to attach the rear fender.  Not really sure what to do other than cutting the fender way back or denting in the fender in to accept the brace further back sort of like the fender is dented in towards the rear of the last pic.  there is pleeeenty of clearance in the wheel well.



« Last Edit: Sep 30, 2016, 20:13:55 by Harsh »
2014 Triumph Tiger
2007 Triumph Daytona 675 - Track Bike
1974 Honda CB750 Cafe
1972 (x2) Honda CB350

Offline Harsh

  • Posts: 170
Re: 72 CB350 For the Daughter
« Reply #24 on: Oct 01, 2016, 15:51:03 »
All right, I got the rear brace made.  It was a bit of a pain to get the bend in since I don't really have the tools for metal working, but it is done.






The front is another story.  I am terrified of cutting off the rear tank mounting bracket.  However, I don't see another way.  I am going to post this and bounce my thoughts off others before I go to cutting.  Maybe someone will have another idea or confirm my thoughts.



OK...There is 1/2" between the underside of the tank and the peak in the frame.
15/16" from the frame where the bracket is welded to to the top of the bracket.
The flat stock I would weld on is 3/16".
Subtract the flat stock from the total distance of the bracket and I am left with 3/4".
The peak is 3/16".
If I were to grind it down I would be down to 9/16".
The rubber cushion for the rear of the tank is 5/16".
That would give me 1/4" of clearance under the tank.

If I were to leave the peak I would have 1/16" of clearance under the tank.
2014 Triumph Tiger
2007 Triumph Daytona 675 - Track Bike
1974 Honda CB750 Cafe
1972 (x2) Honda CB350

Offline Harsh

  • Posts: 170
Re: 72 CB350 For the Daughter
« Reply #25 on: Oct 01, 2016, 17:17:43 »
I may have figured out another way.  The first pic is how the seat sits with the rubber piece in place and the second one is without the rubber piece.  I noticed that without the rubber piece the seat actually contacts the frame.  The difference is 5/8".  The legs on the bracket are 1/2.  So if I were to cut the bracket legs off and weld the bracket directly to the frame I would be in a much better position.  I like this idea better because it allows me to keep the stock mounting bracket and rubber cushion.  And since I just thought of it, if I were to weld the bracket to the underside of the frame I would eat up that extra 1/8".  I think I would have to slide the bracket back a hair to clear the down tube, but there is plenty of room to still secure the tank in the rubber cushion.



2014 Triumph Tiger
2007 Triumph Daytona 675 - Track Bike
1974 Honda CB750 Cafe
1972 (x2) Honda CB350

Offline tattoo

  • Posts: 113
Re: 72 CB350 For the Daughter
« Reply #26 on: Oct 01, 2016, 18:36:43 »
Holy cow!!   that disc rotor is a work of art!!!   and the top triple looks gorgeous too.


Offline Harsh

  • Posts: 170
Re: 72 CB350 For the Daughter
« Reply #27 on: Nov 23, 2016, 16:34:23 »
Well it has been a while since I have provided an update.  I seem to be really bad about it during this build.

I figured I would rather cut the seat than cut the frame.  So I cut a small notch out of the base pan and foam at the front of the seat so it would slide over where the rear of the tank gets secured.  Figuring out the rear mounting points for the seat took a bit of deep thought for me.  I ended up cutting and shaping some square tube and some flat stock to match the frame and angle of the mounts of the seat.  Since the seat mounts aren't flat it would be damn near impossible to use the supplied bolts.  So I used some threaded pins.  Once I get everything done I will cut them down to size and drill a hole in the pin and secure it with a hairpin cotter pin.  That will allow for an easily removed seat if/when I need to gain access to the battery.







Moving on to bracing the rear of the frame.  I decided to use the stock bridge and just weld it in place.  I used some flat stock on the inside of the frame and ran it up into the inside of the bridge for a bit of extra support.  It is extremely strong and there is no twist.  I cut the rear of the frame at the same angle as the seam on the seat for a bit of symmetry.  Made some plugs for the rear of the frame so it isn't an open eyesore.

All welded and ground.


I did go back and weld in the divots from where I drilled out some spot welds.


With the fender installed.  It uses the stock mount at the front bottom, but I have it bolted to the cross brace.





With the fender installed.  I cut it down to match the shape of the seat.




I cut down the front fender, although I think I may have cut it a bit shorter than I wanted to.  It looked good mocked up with tape for the cut lines, but after it was done I think it is a tad too short.  Oh well...too late now.  It isn't horrible, just maybe an inch or so shorter than I would have preferred.

Scrubbed down the engine.  Getting the bead blasting media out of the passages, nooks, and crannies is always non fun, but obviously has to be done.  When I was done there was enough media in the bottom of the basin to fill my cupped palm.

Proceeded on to blocking the head and jugs.  The head has a fair amount of casting flaws, but it should seal fine.  I also honed the cylinders and lapped the valves.  I am starting to get excited about getting the engine back together.  I just hope there is a semi warm day in the near future so I can get it painted.








2014 Triumph Tiger
2007 Triumph Daytona 675 - Track Bike
1974 Honda CB750 Cafe
1972 (x2) Honda CB350

Offline Harsh

  • Posts: 170
Re: 72 CB350 For the Daughter
« Reply #28 on: Nov 29, 2016, 20:55:10 »
Spent the last two days cleaning the engine parts with acetone and getting them taped up for painting.  I also drilled and tapped the holes for the oil splash guard.  Tomorrow should be just a quick acetone wipe down then on to the painting.  Tomorrow is probably going to be the last good temperature day for the year so I have to get it done tomorrow.

2014 Triumph Tiger
2007 Triumph Daytona 675 - Track Bike
1974 Honda CB750 Cafe
1972 (x2) Honda CB350

Offline Harsh

  • Posts: 170
Re: 72 CB350 For the Daughter
« Reply #29 on: Nov 30, 2016, 17:40:34 »
What a mad dash rush of a day.  While the temperature is warm the skies are overcast and threatening of rain.  I felt a couple of sprinkles when I was setting up the table, but nothing afterwards.  Needless to say I was in a rush to get the painting done before the rain moves in.

All primed




And painted

2014 Triumph Tiger
2007 Triumph Daytona 675 - Track Bike
1974 Honda CB750 Cafe
1972 (x2) Honda CB350