collapse

www.dimecitycycles.com


www.restocycle.com

www.CITYLIMITMOTO.com

www.jadusmotorcycleparts.com

www.bisonmotorsports.com

www.speedmotoco.com

www.cognitomoto.com

www.townmoto.com

www.sparckmoto.com

www.Moto-Madness.com

www.pistonsociety.com

QUESTIONS ABOUT THE SITE? TROUBLE REGISTERING? ADMIN@DOTHETON.COM

Author Topic: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build  (Read 91590 times)

Offline JadusMotorcycleParts

  • DTT SUPPORTER
  • *
  • Posts: 730
    • Jadus Motorcycle Parts
Re: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build
« Reply #675 on: Oct 22, 2016, 05:42:38 »
Wow! Epic build, Jadus! I really appreciate it. Everything looks so clean and new. As it should be with projects :)
I loved your style with 3D printing. I myself study printing engineering so your build is inspiration for my future ideas. I started studying it with an idea to somehow incorporate it into motorcycles and you've just done it :D

Thanks mate.  Yeah, lucky for me the product development industry was probably the earliest adopter for 3D printing as it is so beneficial to speeding up the process.  Plus, both the last two places I have worked invested in one - so I managed to learn on the job (not hard btw, but a bit time consuming at times). 

The process has come so far in just a few years, so pretty soon it won't be just prototypes, it'll be finished pieces that are just as strong, if not stronger than CNC made billet parts.  We're pretty much already there with the laser sintering process...  Real cool stuff! 

Offline HerrDeacon

  • DTT SUPPORTER
  • *
  • Posts: 3614
Re: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build
« Reply #676 on: Oct 22, 2016, 06:18:52 »
Just for reference, here is a better, clearer image of how the tank badge sits in relation to the bottom edge of the tank and the frame rail.  I will definitely be placing them in the position I want with the double sided foam tape and just putting the screw heads there.

I agree with you on the tank badge and good on you for fixing it, if you're like me it would bug you every time you looked at it so best to get it done now. Bike is looking great!
Perry

1972 Honda CB350 K4 / 1978 Honda XL250S /1982 Honda MB5 / 2014 Honda CB500X

Offline JadusMotorcycleParts

  • DTT SUPPORTER
  • *
  • Posts: 730
    • Jadus Motorcycle Parts
Re: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build
« Reply #677 on: Oct 25, 2016, 04:11:57 »
I agree with you on the tank badge and good on you for fixing it, if you're like me it would bug you every time you looked at it so best to get it done now. Bike is looking great!

Thanks.  Yep, its gotta be done!

I decided I wanted to tidy up some of the wires under neath the seat.  Even though the side covers will cover it all, I don't want to just cable tie things out of the way.  I think I'll just cut up a thin sheet of aluminium that mounts up to the small bracket under the seat (luckily I didn't remove them!).

Offline JadusMotorcycleParts

  • DTT SUPPORTER
  • *
  • Posts: 730
    • Jadus Motorcycle Parts
Re: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build
« Reply #678 on: Oct 30, 2016, 16:02:47 »
Some progress with the electrics tray/tidy.  Yay.  Originally I was going to bolt it to the underside of the tabs, but then decided it would be cleaner if it was up under the frame rails slightly, hence the two mock ups.  It was sweet to make it out of 2mm ally sheet so I could just use the snips.  Nice and easy.  Then a sand and matte black paint.  I love button head machine screws too  ;D  Now you can't see anything in terms of wires from a side profile view. 

I don't think I'll tidy the wires up any more than this, as long as there won't be any shorting happening and they are out of the way.  Just really want to avoid more cable ties! 

Offline interceptor

  • Posts: 864
Re: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build
« Reply #679 on: Oct 30, 2016, 16:28:35 »
Nice and neat. Good job!
Opinions are like farts... they stink and no one wants to hear it except yourself.

Offline bcnSR250

  • Posts: 17
  • Everything is Better With Bacon
Re: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build
« Reply #680 on: Oct 30, 2016, 16:29:09 »
Looks great, it looks factory. I'll probably be stealing this on my bike

Sent from my phone at a place via an app


Offline xb33bsa

  • Posts: 7727
Re: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build
« Reply #681 on: Oct 30, 2016, 17:36:22 »
you should make a cooler that goes in that vacant area a deep freeze cryrowgenic type for transporting cut off  fingers(industrial accidents) and afterbirth(human gene gnome syrup) and shit like that see,follow the bambalance-es

Offline interceptor

  • Posts: 864
Re: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build
« Reply #682 on: Oct 30, 2016, 18:05:42 »
you should make a cooler that goes in that vacant area a deep freeze cryrowgenic type for transporting cut off  fingers(industrial accidents) and afterbirth(human gene gnome syrup) and shit like that see,follow the bambalance-es
Did you eat paint chips as a child?
Opinions are like farts... they stink and no one wants to hear it except yourself.

Offline HerrDeacon

  • DTT SUPPORTER
  • *
  • Posts: 3614
Re: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build
« Reply #683 on: Oct 30, 2016, 18:42:59 »
Very neat work!
Perry

1972 Honda CB350 K4 / 1978 Honda XL250S /1982 Honda MB5 / 2014 Honda CB500X

Offline JadusMotorcycleParts

  • DTT SUPPORTER
  • *
  • Posts: 730
    • Jadus Motorcycle Parts
Re: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build
« Reply #684 on: Nov 01, 2016, 14:16:44 »
Did you eat paint chips as a child?

I just spat my coffee haha  Yeah sorry xb, that one went over my head.  Thanks for the compliments otherwise.

I didn't like any of the crankcase breather filters I had so I took the white/silver/chrome one and scuffed it up, masked it, then painted it black.  I like it now.  I think I'll use the original tube though to place the filter inside the triangle (behind the side covers) rather than straight onto the spigot on the engine.

Offline JadusMotorcycleParts

  • DTT SUPPORTER
  • *
  • Posts: 730
    • Jadus Motorcycle Parts
Re: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build
« Reply #685 on: Nov 01, 2016, 14:46:27 »
I've been saving this post for a few days because its a big one and I treated it like a bit of a project in of itself.  The side covers...

I modelled up a new cover based on the 3D file from the scanning.  Then I made a prototype of that to check how everything fit up.  There were quite a few small tweaks that needed to be made - mostly with the position of the fastening points but also with the fitment and alignment in the frame.  I wanted to get it to fit a little tighter and flusher.

All along I thought that the side covers should just be flat (well, curved, but relatively plain) because that is what I feel Yamaha would have originally done with this entry level bike.  Also, the stock ones on the Special models were just plain.  But after seeing this prototype I thought I could/should do better.

Then came some sketching and ideation.  Whatever talent I have lacked as a designer in the area of sketching I have managed to make up for it elsewhere, but my abilities held me back here for sure :( haha.  Given, some of the forms are somewhat hard to express in 3D with just a pen and pencil, and screw cracking out the markers!  I limited myself to a few simple silhouette style 2D drawings to see if I could pull in some feature/line of the bike into a design feature in the actual cover.  I always look for something to connect to somewhere else on the bike/product.  So it 'makes sense' a bit.  I also looked a lot at existing Yamaha side covers that I like a lot - certain models of RD350, XS650 and others.

The challenge I realised was that I wanted the cover to look pretty stock still, so a lot of the concepts ended up looking too aftermarket or even 'racey' which is not what the SR, or at least this one is about.  So speed holes and channels were ruled out after seeing them.

Then I decided I liked the idea of trying to pull in the nice curve at the rear of the tank and try to blend that into a smooth surface.  I made a couple of prototypes of this idea with two different depths of the detail.  When I modelled it up in 3D I did a sketch of how I would do it, I usually do this when I model things up, especially if there are mating surfaces involved and there needs to be continuity - then I need to plan a bit. 

I found the first prototype was too shallow and needed to be exaggerated more for it to look intentional.  Then with the second prototype glued and filled together I tested it on the bike.  This time with the seat on too.  Which I should have done from the beginning because it looked funky right away.  Too busy and confused all in one area and not really lining up. 

So I decided to try another one of the concepts - one where the line of the tank/seat junction continues into the cover and then flicks back rearward.  Thats where I am at now and I like it a lot.  I might tweak it slightly to see if the curve should be tightened or loosened and if it could line up any better.

Offline zap2504

  • Posts: 332
Re: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build
« Reply #686 on: Nov 01, 2016, 14:53:48 »
I also like the under-seat platform idea!

RE: crankcase breather - there was an interesting technical article in the October 2016 edition of Motorcycle Consumer News by Dave Searle (former editor of MCN) talking about oil vapor breathers, separators, and some racing tricks. Mentioned were the use of both 1-way valves in the in the crankcase vents and vacuum pumps on crankcases to reduce pumping losses. Since a single-cylinder engine pumps a lot, I was thinking on trying out a 1-way PCV in-line with an automotive fuel filter acting as a catch can; probably suspended up under the seat.

Offline sbruton

  • DTT SUPPORTER
  • *
  • Posts: 312
  • Where the fvck is that money you owe me?!?
Re: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build
« Reply #687 on: Nov 01, 2016, 15:21:27 »
Jake!  Very cool stuff indeed.  I think you have a winner with "lastestidea.jpg"

The inset flows perfectly with the line between the seat and tank as well as the frame rail.

Offline advCo

  • DTT BOTM WINNER
  • *
  • Posts: 2057
  • Nick Ol' Eye
    • adventur Studios
Re: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build
« Reply #688 on: Nov 01, 2016, 15:28:56 »
Very cool. 3D printing is a great method for prototyping, I have to set mine back up after relocating my office a couple months ago..

Will you use the 3D print as a mold for fiberglass? Or what will the final product be constructed of?
"He broke the mirrors off his Cadillac, 'cause he doesn't like it looking like he looks back."

74 CB360 - Luna - http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=63294.0
82 GS550L - Tracker-ish - http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=67229.0 - Sold
74 XL350 - The Turd - http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=70252.0
Suzuki FA50 "No-Ped" - http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=71189.0
73 Suzuki RV125 -http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=73875.0

Offline Tune-A-Fish©

  • DTT SUPPORTER
  • *
  • Posts: 6980
  • BOTM LOSER Proudly Deplorable
Re: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build
« Reply #689 on: Nov 01, 2016, 15:44:39 »
Very cool. 3D printing is a great method for prototyping, I have to set mine back up after relocating my office a couple months ago..

Will you use the 3D print as a mold for fiberglass? Or what will the final product be constructed of?

Why not just epoxy dip the printout after an ABS slurry coat?
"I didn't come here and I ain't leavin"  Willie Nelson

"love hard, live fast, die fun" Kacey Musgraves

"Like a Wreckin Ball!" Eric Church