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Author Topic: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build  (Read 99775 times)

Offline bcnSR250

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Re: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build
« Reply #690 on: Nov 01, 2016, 16:43:07 »
That last one looks fantastic, your making me want to get a 3D printer

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Offline JadusMotorcycleParts

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Re: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build
« Reply #691 on: Nov 03, 2016, 05:07:42 »
That last one looks fantastic, your making me want to get a 3D printer

Doooo it!  There are some really sweet affordable options now and so much support online, not to mention all the help on youtube through tutorials.

Will you use the 3D print as a mold for fiberglass? Or what will the final product be constructed of?

Why not just epoxy dip the printout after an ABS slurry coat?

I thought I would get the covers looking the way I wanted first, then remodel them with the surface set back 2-3mm and print another set to then finer glass over the top of.  Or even 3D print some kind of 2-part mild.  BUT, after handling these prototypes, I am 100% confident that they are strong enough as they are.  They have a 1.5mm wall thickness with a 20% infill and they seem really stable.  With the mounting points, if I construct them in a way with this process in mind, I can give them ribs and support where needed.  So I think I will print them out at a slightly higher resolution (right now they are only at 0.3mm layer thickness which is pretty rough), then run a light coat of filler over them, then spray putty, then top coat!  The biggest shortcoming of PLA is its weakness under any hot conditions, its melting temp is so low that it gets soft and warps.  But I figure these will not be subject to too much heat  - mostly hanging in the breeze.  I'll have to give a long term report on them in a year or so  ;D

Offline JadusMotorcycleParts

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Re: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build
« Reply #692 on: Nov 03, 2016, 05:11:14 »
I also like the under-seat platform idea!

RE: crankcase breather - there was an interesting technical article in the October 2016 edition of Motorcycle Consumer News by Dave Searle (former editor of MCN) talking about oil vapor breathers, separators, and some racing tricks. Mentioned were the use of both 1-way valves in the in the crankcase vents and vacuum pumps on crankcases to reduce pumping losses. Since a single-cylinder engine pumps a lot, I was thinking on trying out a 1-way PCV in-line with an automotive fuel filter acting as a catch can; probably suspended up under the seat.

Thanks for this Zap.  I love that stuff!  Do you have a copy of the article? I will look into what Yamaha have done internally inside the crankcases for this bike and post a couple pics :)

Offline zap2504

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Re: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build
« Reply #693 on: Nov 04, 2016, 17:49:15 »
Sorry, I do not have a digital image of the article (probably too new). Here's a couple links that speak to the same issue:
http://suzukisavage.com/cgi-bin/YaBB.pl?num=1470705659
http://www.suzukihayabusa.org/forum/index.php?topic=144179.0
http://www.motorcycle.in.th/article.php/Crankcase-Pressure_Engine-Performance

I figure that my idea (not new by any sort) would work better than just a filter attached to the crankcase vent if you are doing away with the stock air box or trying to replicate the OEM recycling into the intake tract.

Offline Eleganten

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Re: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build
« Reply #694 on: Nov 06, 2016, 18:29:00 »
Looks awesome. Why not use ABS instead of PLA? Also, what kind of printer is that?


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Offline JadusMotorcycleParts

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Re: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build
« Reply #695 on: Nov 07, 2016, 06:09:34 »
Thanks for that info Zap, I read all of it.  really interesting stuff.  I'm too close to finishing this build to try and implement something other than the breather filter, but the next SR I build will definitely employ something like that Armen guy suggested on the Savage forum.  In fact, lots of the good ideas brought up in this thread that I haven't managed to get into this bike will be experimented with on the next  ;D

Eleganten, ABS would be ideal actually.  Then I probably wouldn't need reinforcement at all.  But to print ABS you need a heated bed and I can't be assed sorting that out.  My intention with printing all along was/is just to make prototypes for fitment and to see how they look before making proper parts from proper materials.

The printer is a Printrbot metal plus.  I bought it as a kit and it was only available for a short time - I suspect they had a lot of issues with it because I certainly did.  Now they only offer it assembled and with a heated bed.  The two biggest issues were the parts lifting off the bed - the aluminium plate is too cold and the heat differential to the hot plastic caused the parts to lift and warp.  This was solved with build tak and I haven't had many issues since!  The other issue was that the printer head ploughs into the work piece all the time, hard enough to break the part off the bed.  I solved this by making a new printer bed that sits above the stock one and is spring loaded - so if/when the printer head hits the work piece, the whole bed just pushes down then springs back up again.  Works a treat.   ;D

Offline 3DogNate

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Re: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build
« Reply #696 on: Nov 07, 2016, 13:56:17 »
Thanks for that info Zap, I read all of it.  really interesting stuff.  I'm too close to finishing this build to try and implement something other than the breather filter, but the next SR I build will definitely employ something like that Armen guy suggested on the Savage forum.  In fact, lots of the good ideas brought up in this thread that I haven't managed to get into this bike will be experimented with on the next  ;D

Eleganten, ABS would be ideal actually.  Then I probably wouldn't need reinforcement at all.  But to print ABS you need a heated bed and I can't be assed sorting that out.  My intention with printing all along was/is just to make prototypes for fitment and to see how they look before making proper parts from proper materials.

The printer is a Printrbot metal plus.  I bought it as a kit and it was only available for a short time - I suspect they had a lot of issues with it because I certainly did.  Now they only offer it assembled and with a heated bed.  The two biggest issues were the parts lifting off the bed - the aluminium plate is too cold and the heat differential to the hot plastic caused the parts to lift and warp.  This was solved with build tak and I haven't had many issues since!  The other issue was that the printer head ploughs into the work piece all the time, hard enough to break the part off the bed.  I solved this by making a new printer bed that sits above the stock one and is spring loaded - so if/when the printer head hits the work piece, the whole bed just pushes down then springs back up again.  Works a treat.   ;D

I added Auto leveling to my printer via an inductive sensor on an aluminum bed. http://www.ebay.com/itm/1pc-LJ12A3-4-Z-BX-Inductive-Proximity-Sensor-Detection-Switch-NPN-DC6-36V-4mm-/262497221271?hash=item3d1e0dba97:g:v84AAOSwM4xXbea8

(A heated bed is REALLY easy to add too. if you want to get into that. If you've recompiled firmware you know what you are in for.) I still prefer PLA or PET over ABS for most things... ABS can be a bit soft for smaller objects especially mechanical ones. newer PLA melts at similar temps to ABS anyway... ABS takes paint better is about the only thing it's got going that PLA doesn't and that's just due to ABS being solvent sensitive and PLA being very resistant.


Offline JadusMotorcycleParts

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Re: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build
« Reply #697 on: Nov 09, 2016, 09:00:39 »
Yeah I always liked PLA.  No smell, strong enough, and no near for heated bed (in most cases)

This printer came with the autoleveling function with an inductive sensor.  I actually added steel washers to the printer bed so that the sensor picked it up sooner than it does with just plain aluminium.  This then lifts the sensor further away from the work piece in relation to the printer nozzle during a print.


Offline HerrDeacon

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Re: Yamaha SR250 - A clean standard build
« Reply #699 on: Nov 09, 2016, 11:01:56 »
Levelled and attached tank badges

Much, much better!!!
Perry

1972 Honda CB350 K4 / 1978 Honda XL250S /1982 Honda MB5 / 2014 Honda CB500X