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Author Topic: An odd one. 82 kz750r1.  (Read 8891 times)

Offline cbrianroll

  • Posts: 210
Re: An odd one. 82 kz750r1. Brat cafe.
« Reply #20 on: Jan 24, 2017, 18:09:36 »
I never actually thought of bikes in categories, I just build what I like. Maybe they all should just be called "customized". Open forum means your gonna be critized, in a good way and a bad way. No one wants you to do something unsafe, it's your build, just gleam the good and ignore the bad

Offline Coopacoopacoopa

  • Posts: 71
Re: An odd one. 82 kz750r1. Brat cafe.
« Reply #21 on: Jan 24, 2017, 18:14:03 »

Don't get too worked up over stuff posted in your thread.  Like I said in sentence #1, it's your bike do what you like.   We are glad you brought your build here, just don't expect everyone to only post love notes.  It's an open forum with lots of different tastes.

Trying not to haha  ;D Vwvortex is a far more harsh environment.  ::)  I'm aware forums are full of opinions good and bad. And everyone has an opinion. Not expecting love notes. I see build threads as a way for someone to track progress, learn from others, and be provide resources for others to learn as well. 

You only need to decide if you want the bike to look cool or work better than it was born.

Choppers are totally impractical but look cool and a well done one will ride well in a straight line but not necessarily corner well.

Brats, well, they are just dumb and don't check any boxes, so I have no clue why its a thing.

Cafe racers are like a more freestyle version of a superbike, and usually have more of a vintage feel to them. Well done ones are some of the coolest builds out there, but there are a lot of hack jobs. Doing a bike right and making lots of custom pieces to really make it your own isn't cheap so get ready.

When you think superbike, think this:

http://kickstart.bikeexif.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/kawasaki-kz1000.jpg

Not this:

http://www.motorcycleclassics.com/~/media/Images/MCC/Editorial/Articles/Magazine%20Articles/2007/01-01/Kawasaki%20KZ1000R%20Eddie%20Lawson%20Replica/Kawasaki-KZ1000R-03-parked%20jpg.jpg?h=365&la=en&w=550&hash=35E74A2FB48BBE6A642726BAF79CC2A7EF068ACC

The first represents the highest level of craftsmanship and tech in braking, suspension and power of the era. The latter is a marketing ploy that does many things well, but wouldn't hold a candle to the first one.

Form should follow function, and those that know the difference will see a bike that functions better, and it will look better in their eyes. Lots of bling and shitty bolt-ons like pods, balloon tires and the like are not the route to take if you want your work to be appreciated. Notice I said appreciated, that is not about you getting cool points, its about knowing that you built something to a high level. If you build a clown bike, that reflects on you that you aren't a person who listens more than speaks, who doesn't do research on everything, and is willing to settle for less than you are probably capable of.

That's the truth^ I seem to have a bad taste in my mouth about early super bikes. More than likely seeing too many ugly add-ons. I do like true race bikes, like the kz1000 you posted. Cool little write up bikeexif did on Pridmore/ the Vetter bike.

 

Offline Coopacoopacoopa

  • Posts: 71
Re: An odd one. 82 kz750r1. Brat cafe.
« Reply #22 on: Jan 24, 2017, 18:16:52 »


Some tasty looking fork oil in this one.



All disassembled. I will say, the sharpened broomstick handle trick to hold the damper rod in place worked surprisingly well ;D

Offline coyote13

  • Posts: 1197
Re: An odd one. 82 kz750r1. Brat cafe.
« Reply #23 on: Jan 24, 2017, 18:18:59 »
Oh man, if you're coming from Vortex this place will be a breeze haha

PS FWIW I dig the CB750 you posted, minus the velocity stacks.  They just have no place on a road-going bike.
Half the fun's in the get there...

Offline Coopacoopacoopa

  • Posts: 71
Re: An odd one. 82 kz750r1. Brat cafe.
« Reply #24 on: Jan 24, 2017, 18:57:20 »
Oh man, if you're coming from Vortex this place will be a breeze haha

PS FWIW I dig the CB750 you posted, minus the velocity stacks.  They just have no place on a road-going bike.

Purists and know-it-all's make forums a dangerous place. Vortex is chock full of em.



I have a funny feeling the previous owner attempted to replace the fork seals, and rounded this guy out, and gave up. There is something to be said for using a 2lb brass hammer to pound a quality 8mm allen in to be certain the allen headed bolts will come out the first time. We're talking snap-on, cornwell, mac, hazzett. Harbor freight will simply not suffice! Sometimes spending a few extra dollars on quality tools is better than spending all too much time butchering/drilling/tapping things. 

Quick tip. If you run into something that got really mucked up, and the proper allen just won't do it. A triple square style bit can be brass hammered into what's left of the 8mm allen head. I used a 1/2 drive mac triple square and it did the trick. Now to replace the bolt.  ::) 

Offline SrgtBear

  • Posts: 842
  • The arsenic has oddly shaped feet...
Re: An odd one. 82 kz750r1. Brat cafe.
« Reply #25 on: Jan 24, 2017, 20:48:06 »
The ugly part about removing that bolt is that it moves with the inner shaft piece holding the outer tube and inner tube together.  I've only been able to remove them using two methods.  I'd probably remove using the first method vs the second. 
  • Keep the spring in and cap on.  Compress fork upside town and use an electric or hand impact driver to remove.
  • Stick a series of 1/4 socket extensions down to inner tube to wedge in the open of the inner shaft piece, then remove bolt on other side using standard ratchet.

As far as my 2 cents on the bike, all styles are great as long as the bike is functional.  Things I don't consider functional:
  • no front fender
  • no rear/mud protector
  • barely any cushion seat
  • lack of addiquate turn signals, and headlamp
  • uncomfortable handlebars/riding postion
Remember you want to ride the bike and enjoy it, not limited your rides because of comfort.
Ted

Kawasaki Kaiju (怪獣) - 79 KZ650 - 700cc Bore Cam Rocket - http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=39748.0
75 Yamaha XS500B Cafe - Completed - http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=14392.0
74 Honda XL 125 - Original - http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=25706.0

Offline jpmobius

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Re: An odd one. 82 kz750r1. Brat cafe.
« Reply #26 on: Jan 24, 2017, 20:57:39 »
As far as my 2 cents on the bike, all styles are great as long as the bike is functional.  Things I don't consider functional:
  • no front fender
  • no rear/mud protector
  • barely any cushion seat
  • lack of addiquate turn signals, and headlamp
  • uncomfortable handlebars/riding postion
Remember you want to ride the bike and enjoy it, not limited your rides because of comfort.

Right on all counts!
Mobius


On a long enough timeline, the survival rate for everyone drops to zero.

1973 RD350 Yamaha build  http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=66498.0

Offline hillsy

  • Posts: 4117
Re: An odd one. 82 kz750r1. Brat cafe.
« Reply #27 on: Jan 25, 2017, 01:50:09 »
Wikipedia lied to me, no surprise.  ::) 


Wiki probably meant to say fastest 750 of its year. In 82 everyone had an 1100 on the floor that would have been faster than the 750's.

Offline Coopacoopacoopa

  • Posts: 71
Re: An odd one. 82 kz750r1. Brat cafe.
« Reply #28 on: Jan 29, 2017, 15:17:35 »


Need to clean and organize my garage for more working space. Haven't lived here for long, but I haven't exactly put the garage together the way I want either. Oh well. I put a spacer in the front forks to lower it some. Tossed them on just to see what's what. I still need to put oil and new seals in either way. Next up is building a battery and electronics box. Also need to get a rear loop on.

I understand car tires very well, but I'm not up to speed on motorcycle tires. Right now it has a 19 front, 18 rear. Tire sizes currently are 100-90-v19 front, 120-90-v18 rear. The back tire is actually fairly new so I may keep it. It's a dunlop arrowmax. Thoughts? I'd like to bump up the aspect ratio on the front tire so it's a little bit larger and matches the rear better. Should I just find an 18 inch front? To my understanding some other kz's had matching 18 front and rear. If I'm keeping the 19 front, what size should I be looking into? There is a little bit of concern with clearing the exhaust, but I do have some room to work with.   

Offline doc_rot

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Re: An odd one. 82 kz750r1. Brat cafe.
« Reply #29 on: Jan 29, 2017, 15:49:23 »
The KZP has a 18" front wheel that is a bit wider, think its 2.15.  if you get the same year kzp wheel it may bolt up but I don't know for certain. I think the 19" wheel looks great on these bikes. and the added benefit is it will give you height clearance for turns since you are planning on lowering it. I would not go wider than the recommended tire sizes, as the smallest suggested rim size for a 100/90/19 is 2.15" stock rim is 1.85". Putting a wider tire on the already too skinny front rim will make it handle sloppily, and added mass will make accel/decel worse. If you're planning on riding this thing like a granny then proceed. IMHO; muffin tops aint cool, even with tires.

Also when fitting the rear "hoop" check for tire clearance under full compression. If you were to connect a straight bar across the rear of the frame right now the tire would rub.

« Last Edit: Jan 29, 2017, 15:56:49 by doc_rot »