DO THE TON

Blood Sweat Tears and Grease => Projects => Cafe Racers => Topic started by: ducatiboy on Jan 07, 2012, 08:40:20

Title: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Jan 07, 2012, 08:40:20
This is a quick post to introduce myself. I've been following the site for a few months now and have decided I should become a little more involved in the social side of things here.

I've always had a bike of some sort since I was a teen and I'll be turning 50 later this year. For the last 25 years I've only really had rubber belt based Ducatis starting with a 500 Pantah (although I once did own a 900S2 bevel) with my current two bikes being '08 848s -- one highly modified for racing, the other pretty much a stock rebuilt wreck for my daily commuter to work.

A couple of years ago, my brother picked up a CB350 for the grand total of $0.00 from my parent's neighbour's farm where it had been sitting under a tree for approx 10 years. It had apparently been running "perfectly" before that but, although complete, a decade in the elements had turned it into the proverbial basket case.  His intention was to get it running and do a cafe conversion but it continued to sit in my parents garage for another year and half until I suggested to him that maybe I could start the work on it at my place which is where it is now.

Here's a few pictures of it the day I picked it up
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/IMG_0981.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/IMG_0980.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/IMG_0979.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/IMG_0978.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/IMG_0977.jpg)


My plan is a cafe conversion (Just what the world needs! Another cb350 cafe conversion  ::)) inspired by El Poquito over at Benjies Cafe Racers. Although I've done plenty of work on my Ducatis over the years including engine rebuilds, I am by no means experienced in bike building as such or in any sort of fabrication of custom parts. This will be my first build and pretty much my first time working on a non-Ducati bike. In addition to that, the constraints of work and family mean it will be a long term project!

Thanks for reading and I'll post up a few more pictures of what where I'm up to when I get the chance
Title: Re: Hi From Australia
Post by: Staffy on Jan 07, 2012, 09:05:54
Welcome bud.  I'm down in SA, where abouts are you located?  Nice find on the Honda too!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia
Post by: smvirili on Jan 07, 2012, 10:04:28
sweet another beefeater down under. welcome to dtt and looking forward to seeing your cb come together mate.
meanwhile while you're here, show us yer ducatis!! 
allthebest
Title: Re: Hi From Australia
Post by: peteGS on Jan 07, 2012, 16:48:55
Welcome from Brissie! Should be a lot of fun right there...
Title: Re: Hi From Australia
Post by: KVoom on Jan 07, 2012, 17:06:35
Welcome that CB will look great when finished the petrol tank looks nice and straight, no major dents.
Title: Hi From Australia
Post by: neevo on Jan 07, 2012, 17:30:44
[Paul Hogan Voice] That's not a basket case, this is a... oh never mind!

Wish my bike was that sweet looking when I got it, good luck on the rebuild. Would be good to have an Aussie resourcing network by city so that we can see who is out there to help us with certain elements. I have skills and tools but lack fabrication equipment.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia
Post by: Staffy on Jan 07, 2012, 18:13:45
[Paul Hogan Voice] That's not a basket case, this is a... oh never mind!

Wish my bike was that sweet looking when I got it, good luck on the rebuild. Would be good to have an Aussie resourcing network by city so that we can see who is out there to help us with certain elements. I have skills and tools but lack fabrication equipment.
Good idea.  I'm sure there's something in the aussie thread.  I'll have a look later.  Bike first, computer later ;)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia
Post by: ducatiboy on Jan 07, 2012, 19:26:16
Thanks for the warm welcome everybody. This forum is a fantastic resource for information, inspiration and motivation!

I'm located in the Inner West of Sydney just around the corner from Deus (world's most expensive "custom" bikes). Although I have a garage with lots of tools in it, it is very small and made even smaller by the amount of junk "stored" in it . Coming from a completely non-mechanical background I lack fabrication and welding equipment AND skills! Those jobs will have to be out-sourced. I do have most tools though

So far I have stripped the bike completely to the bare frame and stripped the motor down to the crank. Sadly, because I was so excited to get started on the project, I did this BEFORE testing compression. Mistake number 1. Oh well, I'll learn as I go! The motor has about 7,000 miles on it (assuming the odometer is accurate) and turned over by hand and although the pistons and cylinders looked reasonable, I bought new 0.25 oversize pistons/rings anyway and the cylinders are away for a rebore. The head has also been sent off for recutting of the valve seats and refacing of valves.

Here's a few more pictures:

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_2910.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_2914.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_2913.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_2917.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_2916.jpg)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia
Post by: ducatiboy on Jan 07, 2012, 19:30:07
More photos for the hell of it

Carbs were a bit of a mess

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_2922.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_2921.jpg)

F***ing hell!

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_2923.jpg)

All clean now though:

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/P1080881.jpg)

And rebuilt with the help of this kit:

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/P1080884.jpg)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia
Post by: ducatiboy on Jan 07, 2012, 19:43:34
During the motor pull down I noticed the engine mounts on the lower cases

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/P1080877.jpg)

A quick visit to ebay and I had another lower case for $65.00 (plus $50 shipping from Florida!)

CL pipes

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/P1080886.jpg)

Despite a CB engine number!

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_2912.jpg)

Rusted out muffler together with dead Huntsman spider

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/P1080885.jpg)

Milk crate full of soda blasted engine parts.

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/P1080875.jpg)

New gasket kit and cam chain

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/P1080878.jpg)

New bronze swingarm bushes

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/P1080880.jpg)

Old cam chain tensioner with new polyamide sprocket with pressed in needle roller bearing

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/P1080879.jpg)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia
Post by: ducatiboy on Jan 07, 2012, 20:10:35
While pulling the front end apart I started to have some thoughts about the forks. This bike has the fork springs outside the stanchions and there was an ungodly rusty mess under the covers. No pictures unfortunately. A few weeks of searching and I couldn't find replacement stanchions so an idea started to form in my head. I have replaced the entire front end of my 848 race bike with Ohlins 803 forks, 30mm offset triple clamps, monobloc radial calipers and lightweight brembo discs. So I have an entire stock 848 frontend sitting in my garage taking up valuable space. So I scratched my head and spent some time measuring up with the Verniers and worked out it could be done. I had the steering stem pressed out of the CB lower triple and pressed into the lower 848 triple with the help of a machined up spacer to make it fit

848 front end
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_4810.jpg)

848 triple with CB stem. CB triple has a little more offset!
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_4806.jpg)

848 vs CB top triple
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_4807.jpg)

The ugly looking lug at the top of the 848 triple (for steering damper) has got to go as it will hit the front of the tank
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_4808.jpg)

Gone!
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_4809.jpg)

And tidied up
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_4811.jpg)

It fits!
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_4812.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_4813.jpg)

Right side
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_4818.jpg)

Not so good on left. Bit of adjustment required on the stop
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_4819.jpg)

How the mock up's looking at the moment. The most over braked CB350 in history!
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_4817.jpg)

Title: Re: Hi From Australia
Post by: MickyC on Jan 07, 2012, 21:14:00
That looks awesome so far mate very well done the front end looks killer and gives the little bike massive stance well done on the mods so far can’t wait to see the bike when it’s finished.

 On a side note went into deus the other day to check out the bikes and grab a feed they has a stock sr500 for $16000 kida sucks for people looking for a project or inspiration. I also priced a cafe seat I priced online for $314aus to find it on sale in the dues chop for $510 great bikes and great atmosphere but shame about the prices.

Also mate where about did you grab the gasket set from? trying to price them for my cb200.
Title: Hi From Australia
Post by: neevo on Jan 08, 2012, 03:50:09
Wow that Ducati front end is awesome! Might need to do something about the rear now though, I think the front tyre is supposed to be smaller than the back ;)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia
Post by: ducatiboy on Jan 08, 2012, 06:17:57
Too right Neevo! That front wheel/tyre is waaay too big. I just put that on for the mock up. I have a 2.15in harley chrome spoke wheel that I will be using for the front. The rear I will probably buy a 3 or 3 1/2in alloy rim to lace up to the the stock hub. Anyone know of any clearance issues with a stock CB350 swingarm and a 3 1/2in rim?

Deepwater, Deus is a great shop to browse through. Just don't even THINK about buying anything there though! Even a coffee is expensive. It's all quality stuff though. My gasket kit was from ebay Sirius Consolidated Inc in Canada. Have a look here

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/HONDA-CB350-CL350-CB350G-SL350-ENGINE-GASKET-SET-/380393447709?pt=Motorcycles_Parts_Accessories&hash=item589137611d#ht_2224wt_873
Title: Re: Hi From Australia
Post by: smvirili on Jan 10, 2012, 00:32:14
aaaaaah this is gonna look sooo good!!!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia
Post by: KVoom on Jan 11, 2012, 22:01:02
Geez mate this is looking good and rapid progress too. Love that angry stance.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia
Post by: ducatiboy on Jan 18, 2012, 17:28:38
The more I look at the front-end in it's mocked up state the more I think the front end of this bike is going to be ridiculously overdone. This bike is eventually going to be my wife's "fun" bike so outright performance is not a huge priority. But adding unsprung weight to a 40 year old bike with only 30 hp sort of defeats the purpose of the "cafe racer" which is supposed to be super light-weight. So I was thinking I may just use a one disc set up. Seeing as I already have my stock 848 callipers, discs and master cylinder my plan was to use these. Does anybody know what effect using the stock master cylinder (designed for use with two discs) will have when using ONE disc?

Also it seems this thread is becoming more of a build thread than simply an introductory one. I don't know how to move this over to the build section. Can one of the moderators help??
Title: Re: Hi From Australia
Post by: Staffy on Jan 18, 2012, 18:32:57
The result will be an overbraked front end.  A slight touch of the brake will throw you over the bars.  You're effectively moving the same amount of fluid with the master, but there's only one caliper piston to take up the travel, if you get my drift.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia
Post by: hillsy on Jan 18, 2012, 23:50:59
Does anybody know what effect using the stock master cylinder (designed for use with two discs) will have when using ONE disc?


The lever will become more wooden, and the braking performance will be reduced. You are effectively taking away a caliper and 2 pads, so you will have less braking regardless of the size of the M/C.
 
Which is probably a good thing considering what you are trying to stop now  ;)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Jan 19, 2012, 05:44:48
Hmmmmm... ???

One response suggesting the brakes will be much too powerful with a disc removed and the other suggesting the braking will be much reduced. Thanks for the replies and thoughts but I'm a little confused.

If the master cylinder designed for dual callipers is too big for a single calliper and creates more braking power for less lever effort isn't that more than made up for by the fact there now only one disc and not two? And wouldn't that mean just using less lever effort to achieve the same level of braking? I'm thinking that the only way to find out for sure is to try it out and see what it feels like.

Anyway, got quite a bit done in the garage today.

The front wheel is a Harley Dynaglide 19" 2.15

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5635.jpg)

The Brembo disc carrier ID is too big so I need a spacer

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5640.jpg)

Disc bolts don't line up so I'll need to drill some holes and tap some threads

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5639.jpg)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: Staffy on Jan 19, 2012, 05:56:03
I had a situation a while ago where I bought a new master cylinder and it turned out it was too small in diameter.  The result of this was a brake lever that came all the way to the bars and hardly pulled up the bike at all. 

You have a set volume inside the system and because the fluid doesn't compress, all fluid displacement results in equal displacement at the other end of the line.  Therefore it can be assumed that a brake cylinder when working in unison with another brake cylinder within the same system whilst under pressure from a master would have half the volume of fluid causing displacement than if the other brake cylinder was removed.  This means that your single brake cylinder has to move twice the distance for the same amount of lever travel (if you take one brake cylinder out), due to it needing to displace the same amount of fluid which is initially intended for two brake cylinders. 

Hopefully that's not too long winded and makes a bit of sense.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Jan 19, 2012, 05:57:39
Masked up the cases

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5630.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5629.jpg)

And the head cover

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5634.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5633.jpg)

Strung up in a tree and painted

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5632.jpg)

And cooked at 90 C for 60 min

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5655.jpg)

Finished!

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5654.jpg)
Title: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: neevo on Jan 19, 2012, 06:16:00
What benefit does cooking the paint offer? Other than offer the potential to get an arse whooping from the other half ;)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Jan 19, 2012, 06:16:10
I understand you're point here Staffy and it's very well explained. Braking 'efficiency' (for want of a better term) is increased by removing one part of the system (i.e. one of the callipers) so that for a given stroke of the master cylinder the pistons of the single remaining calliper will move twice as much as they would have with the two calliper set-up. But overall braking 'power' has been halved by removing one disc/calliper. So has the 'efficiency' increase been more or less offset by the reduction in overall braking power?

The point is moot really as either way the amount of braking for this particular application is going to be excess to requirements!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Jan 19, 2012, 06:20:18
Quote
What benefit does cooking the paint offer? Other than offer the potential to get an arse whooping from the other half

HAHAHA!!! The smell didn't go down tooooo bad...

I painted with VHT engine enamel from a spray can. The back of the can said to fully cure the paint it needs to be heat treated in the oven at 90 C for 60 min. so that's what I did. I imagine you could just start the motor and let the engine heat cure the paint but as you can see I'm a looong way from starting this engine!
Title: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: neevo on Jan 19, 2012, 06:22:14
If your looking to give the Ducati front end a free home I can always help you out ;)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: Staffy on Jan 19, 2012, 06:40:14
You are right,  there would need to be more frictional forces applied at the disc to get the same amount of stopping power with which to pull up the bike.  However, the single piston is much more likely to grab and bite the disc it is operating on and is likely to do so with much less lever travel.  You may find that a small grab of the lever results in the greater frictional forces applying to one disc only.  I'm sure there's some maths in there somewhere which could work all these forces out, but my feeling is the front wheel wouldn't behave very happily under braking at all.  There's an easy fix though which is to go for the single disc, but at the same time go to a master sylinder that's a couple of millimetres smaller in diameter to bring the system back into balance.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: DrJ on Jan 19, 2012, 10:45:08
Where did you find the sprocket?

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/P1080879.jpg)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Jan 19, 2012, 17:11:25
DrJ the sprocket was from ebay seller pawelzak. Just had a look now and it doesn't look like he's got anything up for sale at the moment. At $US49.99 it wasn't cheap!!

Also got the bronze swing arm bushes from the same seller
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: HondaCBGuy on Jan 20, 2012, 07:36:51
Loving that front end. Newcastle boy here. Bring that thing up for an East Coast run when it's done!!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: peteGS on Jan 20, 2012, 16:55:44
Mate that paint is lookin' real good!
 
I used POR 15 Black Velvet high temp paint on mine and the prep work has to be so spot on... I baked mine in our old BBQ rather than the oven so I didn't have the fumes in the house or an angry wife... haha
 
The reason for the baking is that if you don't get it up to temperature, the paint doesn't fully chemically bond with the metal, so moisture can get in over time and cause the paint to peel.
 
Normal heat cycles of the engine will cure it, but as you say if you're not gonna be riding for a while it needs baking... that's the same reason I did my crankcases and valve cover etc.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Jan 22, 2012, 04:44:12
Got a bit done today. But came across a few problems too!

Cases are now back together never to be opened again for at least another 40 years hopefully. Just ignore the ham sandwich in the background.

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5675.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5678.jpg)

Mild temporary panic attack when I couldn't find the bolt for this:

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5680.jpg)

But solved with this:

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5687.jpg)

Little problem with the two o rings for the oil filter cover:

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5691.jpg)

If the manual says it's 63.5mm...

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5697-1.jpg)

Why does the gasket kit I bought have 67.5 o rings?!?

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5692.jpg)

With respect to the oil filter, is this...

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5699-1.jpg)

really supposed to rub up against this when it's spinning at crank speed??

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5693-1.jpg)

Or have I missed something??

FYI

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5682-1.jpg)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5698-1.jpg)

That's better!

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5700-1.jpg)

WOW! Close up photo really makes the cover look bad...going to have to fix that.

All done, just have to clean up some of the gasket crap...

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5683.jpg)

and polish or paint the oil filter cover.

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5700.jpg)

That's all for now. Thanks for looking.

Any of you Australian punters know where I can buy some 63.5 o-rings??
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: Staffy on Jan 22, 2012, 05:07:25
Most places like gardner bearings (or someone else interstate I guess) carry most types and sizes of O rings.

I found this listing online that might be worth a shot too http://www.powersportsplus.com/parts/detail/honda/HP-91315-MGE-000.html
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Jan 22, 2012, 05:28:03
Awesome, thanks Staffy. I'll give it a try

Cheers
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Jan 23, 2012, 07:20:43
Not much done today but I did manage to pull apart the rear wheel. Getting the tyre off was no problem. Who needs tyre levers? Messrs Black and Decker are your friends

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5729.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5731.jpg)

Getting the bead wires was a bit of struggle but got there in the end

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5732.jpg)

Revealing this...

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5737.jpg)

Getting the spokes out with the help of the deputy engineer of the project (my 12 year old son) and WD40 was surprisingly easy

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5736.jpg)

Almost there

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5739.jpg)

Hooray!

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5742.jpg)

Thinking back over my 30 years of riding bikes on an almost daily basis, I don't think i've even ridden a bike with spoke wheels let alone worked on one. I've recently learned that spokes are like belly buttons...they come in two different types. Innies and outties. i.e. those with the little button part inside the hub and those with it outside. Here are the differences.

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5738-1.jpg)

My plan (if I can get all this crap back together) is as follows

Front wheel: Harley 40 spoke 19 x 2.5 inch steel rim. Swap the 19 inch rim out for 18 inch alloy rim. Keep it at 2.5width. Reuse the (brand new) chrome spokes/nipples.

Rear wheel: CB350 hub laced up to 18 x 3.5 inch alloy rim. See how the old spokes/nipples clean up and have them chromed them if they clean up well or get new ones if they don't.

So questions at this stage are:

Can I re-use the spokes from a 19 inch rim in an 18 inch rim? I assume they'll need to be cut shorter and the threads cut a little further. If the thread is cut further, will they need to be rechromed to prevent the newly cut thread from rusting?

Has anyone transplanted a 3.5 inch rear wheel to a stock cb350 frame? Are there any issues with the chain run fouling the frame rail? I am expecting to have to buy or make an offset countershaft sprocket and move the rear sprocket out slightly
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Jan 25, 2012, 06:23:11
My daughter's friend's father is a CNC machinist and engineer. He custom made an axle, spacers and shouldered axle nut to make my 848 forks fit a Harley hub. Just need to have them either chromed or nickel plated. Thanks mate!

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5763.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5764.jpg)

Deputy project engineer wire wheeled the rear wheel spokes and nipples

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5744.jpg)

Before and after...should be good to re-use after chroming

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5753.jpg)

I was somehow overcome by a rush of blood to the head and before I knew what I was doing, I'd completely pulled apart the starter motor, cleaned the unspeakable 40 years of grime built up inside, filled and sanded the outer casing and along with the oil filter cover had them hanging in my custom made spray booth with a coat of primer

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5749.jpg)

Then painted black

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5757.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5755.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5754.jpg)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Jan 25, 2012, 07:13:04
I'm having a hell of a time getting the rear sprocket off the hub. I'm assuming once you knock back the tabs on the lock washer, undo the 4 nuts and remove the giant circlip, the sprocket *should* just lift off right?  Well, it doesn't and it seems like the sprocket bolts are somehow completely seized into the rubber cush drive. They won't budge after soaking in degreaser and wd40 for 2 days, levering with 2 big mofo screw drivers and even a few blows with a big hammer.

Has anyone got any ideas how to get it off? Is it time for the angle grinder or am I missing something?
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Feb 11, 2012, 06:25:13
Still no luck getting the *$&#^ rear sprocket off the hub  >:( >:( >:( >:( I've poured corrosive degreaser into the hub to see if it will free up the cush drive bolts.

Got a few other things done in the meantime though

Starter motor all finished and mounted
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5775.jpg)

Started pulling the gauges apart and found this little mess behind the speedo. I'm no entomologist so no idea what bugs came out of this... :o :o
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5773.jpg)

I've decided to add a few gold highlights here and there. Not sure why, but paying some sort of homage to 'goldline' performance parts often used on Ducatis e.g. Marzocchi forks, Brembo callipers and master cylinders, Campagnolo wheels etc.
Carburettor top
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5779.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5784.jpg)

Stator cover
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5808.jpg)

Camshaft housing
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5803.jpg)

My cylinders arrived back from 0.25mm oversize re-bore
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5799.jpg)

Beautiful honing marks
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5798.jpg)

Brand new pistons ;D ;D
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5800.jpg)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Feb 11, 2012, 06:47:01
Got the last few things done to get the 848 front end to fit.

Top nut to hold the steering head bearings tight. Needed to be custom machined to fit with a 24x1mm thread tapped into it. 24x1mm tap cost $140!! :o Original ducati piece on right, custom made piece on left
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5809.jpg)

Holes were  drilled in the Harley hub so the Brembo discs would fit.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5802.jpg)

Frontend complete! Custom made axle and axle nut, custom spacers of varying sizes and complexity x4, custom holes drilled in hub and threads tapped, custom steering head bearing tensioning nut with 24x1mm thread tapped. Aside from that it was completely straight forward and bolted straight on!! ::)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5815.jpg)

Started work on the headlight bucket
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5786.jpg)

Started painting the barrels/head
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5816.jpg)

As soon as these parts are painted I'll start re-assembling the top end and will have to start thinking about what I'll do with the CL header pipes. Probably wrap in exhaust tape...

Meanwhile, received a parcel with lots of electrical goodies :) :)

Boretech electronic ignition
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5812.jpg)

Coils
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5811.jpg)

Regulator/rectifier
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5814.jpg)

Now just waiting for my frame to come back from having the rusted left lower rail replaced by a friend with a welder
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Feb 11, 2012, 06:57:02
Has anyone used this stuff to line their fibreglass tank? How hard is it to use? Any tips?

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5774.jpg)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Feb 15, 2012, 05:03:19
Ordered some new aluminium rims today.

Front will be 18" x 2.15" laced up to Harley hub re-using the existing chromed spokes from the 19" rim with a washer under the nipple.

Rear will be 18" x 3.0" laced up to the Honda hub re-using the old Honda spokes which will be re-chromed.

Both will be anodised black. At this stage I will not be divulging the cost of the 2 hubs because I haven't yet managed to fully recover from the shock. :o Easily the biggest expense so far. Not sure what tyres I'll be using but plenty of time to worry about that.

Meanwhile, first mock up of the engine all put together.

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5819.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5818.jpg)

Hopefully will have it properly bolted together this weekend.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Feb 15, 2012, 17:54:37
Thanks for the spoke link Swivel! I'm learning all the time. Who would have thought there was so much to a spoke?! I gathered that using a washer under the nipple may be problematic. I assume the washer would have to be cupped. A forum member here (forgotten who) has re-used spokes with washers when changing from a Harley 19" rim to 18" so I'm hoping to be able to do the same. Guess I'll see when the rim arrives!

Is  cutting a thread on a spoke any different to cutting any other kind of thread? What I mean is can't I just clean up the threads on my existing Honda spokes with a standard die of the appropriate size before re-chroming? Or does the chroming process itself damage the thread? In which case, can't I just run a die over the thread after chroming? Thx for your input
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: hillsy on Feb 15, 2012, 18:42:51
How much more expensive is it to just get new spokes as opposed to getting your old ones re-chromed? I can't imagine it being that much more??
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Feb 16, 2012, 05:58:09
Quote
"Every day is a school day",....for your entire life.......

Ain't that the truth!

Thanks for all the info Swivel. I haven't specifically priced re-chroming my spokes. I have some other parts that have been machined up for my frontend (axle, nut and spacers) that need to be coated in something to stop them rusting and I thought I'd get them chromed and while I was at it get the spokes done also. When the time comes I'll look a little more closely at the costing, it may well be cheaper to buy some new ones from Thailand or wherever the hell they come from. I just worry a bit that they'll arrive and they're the wrong length, wrong gauge, wrong thread, wrong bend or wrong something other bloody thing!! At least I know the spokes I've got fit

Won't be powder coating anything. Two pack spray for the frame, spray can for all the frame parts and anodising for the rims (which hopefully are a work in progress as we speak). I take your point regarding the reversibility of a powder coat rather than anodise but I figure that you're guaranteed a good finish with anodising of a new rim and if you change your mind on the colour after you've made your decision, well too bad!

Awesome looking tool by the way! 8)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: hillsy on Feb 16, 2012, 18:34:44

I had three cop cars and two bike cops chase me down a street one day and I did a massive perfect full throttle wheelie at about 80MHP through a dip drain trying to get away and they cornered me at the T.A bit of a pitiful whine and saying my grandma lives in the country and she's going to die,etc worked a treat. Of course she was going to die, sometime........, she was eighty! They let me go scott free and even forgot to give me the ticket that was the reason the bike cop wanted me to stop in the first place! Never lie if you ever get to court,but any distortion, half-truth or just plain idiocy is fine in dealing with cops. They are merely our servants and the court’s errand boys after all, a point that you should remind them of on every occasion.Cops.You gotta love em,....no,wait thats their wives you gotta love,....while they are on patrol!


You should change you name to drivel  ;)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Feb 16, 2012, 20:50:47
I had a HUGE MAJOR victory today! After 40 years the rear sprocket and the rear hub are no longer joined at the hip, no longer peacefully co-existing, happily rusting together, occupying the same coordinates of the time-space continuum. Yes they are now 2 completely separate entities! ;D ;D ;D One soon to be restored to it's the former glory (ie the hub), the other has made it's way to sprocket heaven.

I can't tell you the trouble this sprocket has given me getting it off. WD40, degreaser, rust dissolver, large screwdriver levers, angle grinder, hardened steel wedges, 5 weeks of soaking in toxic corrosive shit, several hundred brutal blows with a moderate sized sledge hammer and it simply dropped off. Easy really!!
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5820.jpg)

To prove the perversity of the laws of motorcycle mechanics, it had the last laugh by managing to draw blood as my hammer blows became more feverish and crazed
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5821.jpg)

But it's all good! I won! 8) 8) 8) I am a legend. I am the ruler of the universe. I can remove the sprocket of a CB350 with my bare hands and large tools. What I did out there in the garage today, to paraphrase Maximus, will echo in eternity.
Title: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: neevo on Feb 16, 2012, 22:10:05
How are you going to get those arms out of the Cush drive rubbers?
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Feb 16, 2012, 23:11:52
No worries Neevo they're all out now ;D Not sure why but two of those little arm things came off with the sprocket and two stayed in the hub but that's what happened. Nothing a set of vice grips couldn't deal with.

Problem now is, the threads on those little arms for the sprocket nuts are trashed. Not sure how that happened, I don't think it would have been the bashing they received! :P :P They are 10x1.25mm and I don't have a die that size. They may be a little too far gone to even clean up the thread but I'll give it a try after a little trip down to the hardware.

By the way I have now encountered the most horrifying moment an amateur motorcycle mechanic can experience :-[ My cases are back together and I have found a part that I can't identify. It's clean enough that I think it's an internal engine part. I just hope it's from the top end :( :(

Can anyone ID this from a CB350??

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5826.jpg)

Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Feb 17, 2012, 02:39:46
That's a great resource Swivel, thanks for posting it. It'll probably take a while to search through it all to find my part but it's a start
Title: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: neevo on Feb 17, 2012, 03:09:28
Good to hear ducatiboy. At least the new sprocket bolts are not too expensive.

Bummer about the extra bit, got my fingers crossed it some innocuous external part.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Feb 17, 2012, 06:04:19
Found it!! Number 3 in this diagram looks like it. Holds the starter motor sprocket on. Easy fix :)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/starting-motor-cb350k4-australia_bigma000148e12_24db.gif)
Title: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: neevo on Feb 17, 2012, 06:09:11
Good news everybody!

Good to hear its an easy fix. Pity the same is not true vs Sri Lanka.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Feb 18, 2012, 07:15:51
Like a small lost child which has now been found... safe, tucked into bed, warm and snug, back where she belongs my little lost orphaned part has also found it's way back to where it truly belongs, snug under the left side cover, using it's well shaped little arms to locate the starter gear to stop it from wandering. It is a truly moving moment and I'm starting to tear up with sheer emotion. I couldn't help but share a photo of the beauty of it...
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5871.jpg)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Feb 19, 2012, 07:40:34

Got a lot done today! After mounting a basketball hoop and backing board on the garage, adjusting my neighbours rear shock preload and compression damping, adjusting another neighbours son's rear brake pedal, hanging a new net on the new basketball hoop and shooting some hoops I managed to get the engine completely back together and bolted up!

Is there anything more exciting than getting your engine all back together? Well yes actually but only just.

Pistons and cylinders snugly back together
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5831.jpg)

Had to grind out the pin of the worn out little wheel of the cam chain tensioner to put the new polyamide sprocket in
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5827-1.jpg)


Big wheel connected to little wheel to keep cam chain tight
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5830-1.jpg)

The cam chain tensioner housing in all it's newly painted glory
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5872.jpg)

The spring in the tensioner is fully compressed when installed. Absolutely no more room in the little housing. The cam chain is real tight. I assume this means that as the chain wears and stretches there is plenty of adjustment in the tensioner to keep the chain tight. Anyway, it all looks good mounted
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5877.jpg)

Rockers ready to rock
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5878.jpg)

Don't know if it's important if all these things go back in where they came from but I labelled them anyway
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5884.jpg)

Left side done
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5885.jpg)


Right side done
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5887.jpg)

Everything smothered in this stuff
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5888.jpg)

When I wake up at  3 o'clock in the morning wondering if I've set the cam shaft up 180 degrees out, here's a photographic evidence to reassure myself that I've got it right. Why Mr Honda didn't design this thing so it could only go together the right way, I don't know
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5890.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5891.jpg)

Mr Honda also specifies a torque setting for the bolts that hold the cam sprocket onto the cam shaft but forgot to leave room to get a torque spanner access to the bolts. Not having bought new bolts as recommended and mindful of the disaster awaiting should a bolt come loose, I used thread locking compound and lock wire. That ought to hold it
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5892.jpg)

Torqued to 14 ft-lb
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5893.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5894.jpg)

And FINISHED ;D ;D ;D I am one happy camper!!
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5895.jpg)(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5896.jpg)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: DrJ on Feb 19, 2012, 13:13:44
Where did you get the sprocket?

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5830-1.jpg)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Feb 19, 2012, 15:14:00
Hey DrJ! You asked the same question a couple of pages back! Must have short term memory loss ;)

It was from ebay along with brass swing arm bushes from the ebay seller Pawelzak
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: DrJ on Feb 19, 2012, 15:15:58
Haha, guess I didn't see your response the first time. Thanks for the lead. Bike's looking good.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: DrJ on Feb 19, 2012, 15:32:52
Just bought one, all the way from Poland of all places. Added bonus, includes a new roller bearing.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Feb 19, 2012, 16:18:31
Hey that's great! Glad I could help. Not the cheapest little piece of plastic...
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: schaubster on Feb 19, 2012, 17:09:41
Great build!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: willdance on Feb 20, 2012, 06:45:22
Loving this build, that engine is looking absolutely amazing!

Looking forward to an Australian "El poquito" charging around Sydney.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: muzz600 on Feb 21, 2012, 07:03:44
Wow - That engine looks fantastic...
Now, what are you going to do for headers/exhaust/mufflers?
Keen to see how you are going to bring them to life...
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Feb 21, 2012, 15:02:34
Thanks for the compliments guys :)

Hmmm...Muzz... 1st post...1st Ducati... 600SS... you wouldn't happen to be...ummm...oh don't worry 8)

As for headers, well now that the engine's done I'm going to have to refocus my train of thought and have a think about it. I can generally only think of one thing at a time before my brain goes fuzzy. I'll probably just keep them as they are and wrap them in exhaust tape but I'm also considering learning how to weld to have a go at making some sort of muffler myself :o
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Feb 25, 2012, 02:11:18
In honour of, and in gratitude to, the Boags Brewery on the Esk River Launceston Tasmania whose fine product has aided and assisted many a Saturday afternoon in the shed
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5908.jpg)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Mar 05, 2012, 05:51:52
Another long day in the shed today. My hands are buzzing from hours with the angle grinder :(

The left side lower frame rail is full of rusty holes
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_4799.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_4798.jpg)

So I cut it out
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/P1090702.jpg)

Bought some 1inch steel tube, cut it too size. Had to heat it up and put a slight bend in to get it to fit
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/P1090708.jpg)

Tacked it in and welded it up. I had my old engine case bolted in the frame to make sure it stayed straight while welding.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/P1090709.jpg)

I ground off the centre stand mounts, foot peg mounts, and various other lugs and welded on mounting points that are not required.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/P1090712.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/P1090713.jpg)

Spent some time mounting up the BCR seat subframe. It was a bit of an epic to get it fitted I assume because it must have been made for a CB360 not a CB350. The ends of the seat subframe tubing drop down to a smaller diameter in order for it to slot into the main frame tubing so it can be easily welded. The trouble is, the CB350 has a rectangular section frame not round tubing. You can't fit a round peg into a square hole so a little modification was necessary…
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/P1090689.jpg)

It  sort of worked…
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/P1090699.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/P1090701.jpg)

So now I can start the mock up build ;D ;D
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Mar 05, 2012, 15:09:12
Yes I'd been thinking about where would be a good place to put some bracing in. I don't have a suitable photo right now but i'll take one in the next day or two. I guess if I'm ever going to do it now is the time
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: NvgtrWiggles on Mar 06, 2012, 02:16:33
God, I want that 848 in the background...
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Mar 13, 2012, 08:39:35
NvggtrWiggles for years I've been thinking of giving the 848 away to some random guy on a bike forum. Send me a PM with your address and I'll ship it over.

Swivel, I've got a side on photo of the frame. Where do you think you'd add  bracing?

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5921.jpg)

So some minor progress has been made. My rims arrived in a big box

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5916.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5910.jpg)

I started (for the first time ever) learning the Zen-like joy of lacing a hub to a rim. Not having ridden anything with spokes since I was 8 years old, my knowledge of what to do was a little rusty.

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5927.jpg)

It's kind of therapeutic as you make mistake after mistake, screw a nipple on, screw it off again, move a spoke to a different hole, move it back again, remove a spoke so you can swing another spoke into position only to find that you now can't get the original spoke back in etc etc As the hours gently drifted by progress was somehow made.

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5928.jpg)

After a while a trance like state is reached and with the right music in the background you could almost think you'd been elevated to a higher Nirvana-like plane with the spokes eventually placing themselves in the correct holes at the right angles all by themselves. Unfortunately I didn't reach this state although I did try to reach it for many hours. I did actually manage to get the wheel laced up though!! It is a thing of rare and exquisite beauty.

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5929-1.jpg)

Unfortunately it's not right. The spokes are too long because they come from a 19 inch rim which I have replaced with an 18 inch. In the following photo you can see the spokes poking too far through the rim.

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5930.jpg)

I had read somewhere on a forum that because the 19 inch Harley rim has a drop centre and the 18 inch replacement rim doesn't, the spokes will work out ok but may need a washer under the nipple. There is no way washers under the nipples are going to help the amount of slack these suckers have. So I'm pricing some custom spokes from Buchanan's. We'll see…

So on to other bits and pieces. I been playing around with the budget MIG welder I bought on special from repco. Welded up the spot welded seams on the frame. Also cleaned up the weld with the angle grinder so it looks a little better than the photo.

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5918.jpg)

I was getting sick of sanding for hours and hours on the rear hub to try and get it to a polishable state. It just wasn't going to happen with too many imperfections to sand out and then polish out so I decided to have it chromed with this special can of spray on chrome. It is not just any spray on chrome though. This stuff is so good it is called Super Chrome.

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5934.jpg)

Voila! Tens of hours of sanding instantly rendered unnecessary

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5933.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5932.jpg)

So what's next? I don't know…there is no plan. I just walk into the garage when I have some spare time and look around and see what needs doing and then I start doing it. I have ordered some spokes from Thailand for the rear wheel though
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Mar 17, 2012, 08:27:49
I agree with your point about grinding ugly welds down for the sake of aesthetics Swivel but I take comfort in the thought that the spot welded joins will be at least as strong as if I had not touched them at all. The advantage of having done it is the joins may be stronger and I at least have a little experience now. This bike is not headed for any race track so outright performance is not important. Given that thought, and my inability to weld a straight line in an aesthetically pleasing manner, I might give the bracing a miss but thanks for the idea.

With regard to my wheel re-spoking epic, I have diagnosed the problem with the front wheel. The donor wheel I am using is from a Harley Narrow Glide. I have adapted the hub of this wheel to use on the 848 front end and I have bought an 18 inch alloy rim from Ash's Spoked Wheels in Brisbane to lace to this hub. Naturally I specified that the rim will be laced to a Harley hub.

After the huge problem lacing up the rim, I had a closer look at the pattern of holes on the new rim vs Harley rim and found they are very different! On the new rim each spoke hole alternates left and right of the centre of the rim whereas on the Harley wheel pairs of spoke holes alternate sides
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5943.jpg)

While it's a bit embarrassing that I hadn't noticed the difference before wasting 6 hours of my life, I claim in my defence that having ordered a rim to fit a specific hub I thought the assumption that it would actually fit that hub was a safe one. Apparently not though, so a lesson has been learnt! Double check everything. If your paranoid, triple check!

I spoke to the guy at Ash's and he sounded quite surprised that there was a problem with the fitting. He is going to consult his colleagues on Monday (it was Saturday when I called) and work out the best way to go. Preferably, they will send me the type of rim I actually ordered. Alternatively they will send me some spokes that will allow me to fit the rim they sent. At the very least, they could cut alternate pairs of the spokes I already have shorter and cut the thread a little further along the shaft.

A few more shenanigans with the rear hub
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5939.jpg)

Finished and looking good…not quite perfect with the masking tape but good enough. Just needs a coat of clear
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5947.jpg)

Two hubs and two rims just waiting for spokes. Rears from Thailand, fronts from Brisbane
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5946.jpg)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: STRETCH-CB on Mar 19, 2012, 07:42:21
great build, love the white king super chrome hahaha, didnt think of that. keep up the good work man.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: sam on Mar 19, 2012, 11:40:33
I love your build so far. What colour scheme are you going to go for? Something similar to the original would go quite well with the job you've done on the engine.

P.S, you need to sneak more 848 cameos into your photos.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Mar 19, 2012, 22:40:52
Bit of a disaster yesterday!!! The White King Super Chrome on the rear hub and the clear coat I sprayed over the top didn't seem to get on too well together. The colour has started to run in sections. :'( :'( :'( I don't think I can bear the thought of rubbing it all down and starting again so I might just leave it. Actually what I'll do is just get on with some other job like building the wiring harness. By the time I finish doing that maybe I'll be able to face fixing the paint on the hub.

Not sure of my colour scheme yet Sam but I quite like the look of the Norton Manx race bikes with the silver tank/seat and blue pinstripe. I'm waiting for inspiration. I'll see what I can do about posting a few 848 photos up. I'm thinking of entering a race meeting at Easter so will be doing a bit of work on it soon nothing major just new tyres, oil change etc
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Mar 25, 2012, 07:34:24
I had a half day at work last week which meant I got home early to spend some quality time in the man cave. Not before a quick cup of coffee at my local cafe
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/IMG_1152.jpg)

I've got the motor mounted in the frame and I'm now mocking up all the components to make sure they are going to fit. First up was to fit the electronic ignition from Boretec. Ignition housing with the points and mechanical ignition advance removed
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5954.jpg)

Electronic ignition rotor installed on the end of the cam shaft.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5955.jpg)

Electrical component installed
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5956.jpg)

Regulator/rectifier and electronic ignition control unit on the underseat tray
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5958.jpg)

New coils in position under the tank
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5953.jpg)

I've got a pair of left over foot peg hangers that I thought I could use. They were bought off ebay years ago and I used them on my race bike back then (748R). They've been kicking around the garage ever since so it's time they were put to good use. First picture mocked up to be sure they're going to fit and to mark a cutting line on the old passenger foot peg mount.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5963.jpg)

Next bolted in place. This is the brake side
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5964.jpg)

Gear shift side with an 848 shift lever in position
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5971.jpg)

With all the electrical components replaced, I'm pretty keen to get some good wiring into this build to replace the 40 year old wiring loom and make sure the whole thing runs reliably. A good friend of mine told me that the wiring loom from a 2000 Toyota Camry will plug straight into a CB350. So I went out and bought one from the local wrecking yard. Looks pretty much like what I need
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_5959.jpg)

Meanwhile, being very mindful of the fact that the style of the bike that one rides makes some sort of statement about the rider, I've been thinking carefully about and looking for inspiration for the final styling of this particular build.  There no doubt there are plenty of beautiful and inspirational styles to choose from as can be seen here...
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/22577_103749186321914_100000604999746_94141_7823696_n.jpg)

Hmmmmm....

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/cb350pictures-1.jpg)

No....

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/IMG_6992.jpg)

Nup....

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/S4020891.jpg)

Next...

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/tumblr_m0e4pk6Iew1qd0ln0o1_1280.jpg)

Ummm..

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/welcome.jpg)

I think ultimately this will be the final shape if not the actual colour. Wouldn't mind that pipe either but $$$!!!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Mar 25, 2012, 07:40:51
Decided to enter a race meeting at Easter on the 848 :) :) :) :) :) :), so time to get it ship shape.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6009.jpg)

May not have too much time to work on the CB for a while!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: TheBullitt on Mar 29, 2012, 18:47:11
 Awesome work ducatiboy.  Inspiring me to get going on my build!!  Can't wait to see more progress.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: redred5389 on Mar 29, 2012, 21:51:32
Not much done today but I did manage to pull apart the rear wheel. Getting the tyre off was no problem. Who needs tyre levers? Messrs Black and Decker are your friends

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5729.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5731.jpg)

Getting the bead wires was a bit of struggle but got there in the end

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5732.jpg)

Revealing this...

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5737.jpg)

Getting the spokes out with the help of the deputy engineer of the project (my 12 year old son) and WD40 was surprisingly easy

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5736.jpg)

Almost there

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5739.jpg)

Hooray!

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5742.jpg)

Thinking back over my 30 years of riding bikes on an almost daily basis, I don't think i've even ridden a bike with spoke wheels let alone worked on one. I've recently learned that spokes are like belly buttons...they come in two different types. Innies and outties. i.e. those with the little button part inside the hub and those with it outside. Here are the differences.

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5738-1.jpg)

My plan (if I can get all this crap back together) is as follows

Front wheel: Harley 40 spoke 19 x 2.5 inch steel rim. Swap the 19 inch rim out for 18 inch alloy rim. Keep it at 2.5width. Reuse the (brand new) chrome spokes/nipples.

Rear wheel: CB350 hub laced up to 18 x 3.5 inch alloy rim. See how the old spokes/nipples clean up and have them chromed them if they clean up well or get new ones if they don't.

So questions at this stage are:

Can I re-use the spokes from a 19 inch rim in an 18 inch rim? I assume they'll need to be cut shorter and the threads cut a little further. If the thread is cut further, will they need to be rechromed to prevent the newly cut thread from rusting?

Has anyone transplanted a 3.5 inch rear wheel to a stock cb350 frame? Are there any issues with the chain run fouling the frame rail? I am expecting to have to buy or make an offset countershaft sprocket and move the rear sprocket out slightly








just curious what would happen if you laced up the wheel the wrong way? like if you used the inner spokes as the outer spokes
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: Super T.I.B on Mar 29, 2012, 22:58:56
Awesome stuff Ducatiboy, you are giving me inspiration to tear down my CB175.

Just my second post on here, I've introduced myself on the local board, I'm from Picton NSW and was an owner of a Duc Monster (until I had to sell it to pay off debt, the worst way to sell a bike  :'( )

Keep it up champion!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Mar 30, 2012, 07:18:11
Thanks SuperTIB. Welcome to the DTT forum. Just make sure you don't waste too much time here at the expense of time in the garage working on the bike!

Red, it's not really possible to get the spokes in the wrong way because the different angles of the neck part of the spoke more or less forces the spoke to sit at a particular angle to the hub. If inserted the wrong way, it soon becomes obvious when you try to line it up to the rim. More confusing than getting the innies and outies on the right side of the hub is getting the correct spoke into the correct rim hole although even this is reasonably straight forward with careful thought and concentration.

Bullitt, I've found the hardest part is just getting the motivation to get started. After that, it all just snowballs from there and you just keep going till it's done!! :) Had a flick through your blog. Some great stuff there!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: TheBullitt on Mar 30, 2012, 13:48:26
Bullitt, had a flick through your blog. Some great stuff there!

Much obliged sir.  When your build is finished, I'd love to feature it on there!!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Mar 30, 2012, 17:30:41
Quote
When your build is finished, I'd love to feature it on there!!

That'd be great to be featured on your site!! I just hope you don't need the content anytime soon because this has got to be the slowest CB350 build in the history of the planet (or so it seems to me). :P :P Real life, work, family commitments etc all take their little slice out of the 24 hours in the day. But I do enjoy my time in the garage. I call it shed therapy ;D ;D
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: TheBullitt on Mar 30, 2012, 17:41:32
That'd be great to be featured on your site!! I just hope you don't need the content anytime soon because this has got to be the slowest CB350 build in the history of the planet (or so it seems to me). :P :P Real life, work, family commitments etc all take their little slice out of the 24 hours in the day. But I do enjoy my time in the garage. I call it shed therapy ;D ;D

The blog's not going anywhere so I'll be ready whenever you're ready  ;D
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Apr 05, 2012, 09:52:26
Bits and pieces over the last few days…

Headlight brackets arrived in the post. They are chrome not black like they look in the photo. They look a little too long and pointy for my liking and are begging to have some more holes drilled into them. I'll see what they look like when I get them on the forks.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6193.jpg)

The Chinese are amazing! They can make and sell anything at a fraction of the cost of the greedy capitalist manufacturers/retailers in the Western world. These clip-ons were off ebay at a bargain price with FREE shipping! I know it will probably spell the end of Western civilisation along with the destruction of our economy but hey! Enjoy it while it lasts...
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6010.jpg)

Checking the fit of various components and starting the joyful process of making a wiring loom…
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6108.jpg)

I thought this was kind of funny. I'm sure this Ducati 848 horn will feel much more comfortable and at home on the Honda CB350
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6179.jpg)

Deputy project engineer tries out the bike for size. My garage is a little crowded…
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6113.jpg)

I wanted to use the 848 side stand mount because when I ground the CB350 mount off the frame, there wasn't really enough left of the mount to weld on at the right angle to function correctly. It had to be ground off because it's original position was on the riders foot peg mounting point. These were being removed to use rear sets.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6184.jpg)

So I ended up cutting the 848 side stand mount down. I thought that because the left front engine mounting bolt was so conveniently located I'd use it to also mount the side stand. That way the side stand mount could be bolted on rather than welded.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6169.jpg)

The trouble is, because the mounting lug is bolted at one point only it doesn't matter how tight you torque the bolt, the lug can turn when the weight of the bike is leaning on it. So I devised an ingenious plan to use a cut down allen key as a locating peg to hold the lug at the correct angle and to prevent it from wandering.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6170.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6172.jpg)

Of course this did not work because there ended up being too much play between the peg and the locating holes. So to stop it turning I put a blob of weld on anyway. Now the lug is permanently attached to the frame and will be reinforced with the engine mounting bolt.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6183.jpg)

The other problem was the side stand spring lug was on the opposite side of the honda side stand. So I ground it off and put a new one on the back of the stand using another cut down allen key. I've found during this build that it is a good idea to have a plentiful supply of allen keys.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6174.jpg)

During all this playing around with little bits and pieces of random bike parts, the thought suddenly dawned on me like a revelation, like a blinding flash, that I had been actually avoiding the REAL issue. All this time I thought I had been making good, albeit slow, progress plodding away in my quiet and humble way. But in fact what I had actually been doing all this time was simply avoiding the fundamental issue, the quintessential question at the heart of this build, indeed, of any build and that is what to do with the rear brake. This realisation threw me into a fit of depression from which I have barely managed to extricate myself. In these difficult times of self doubt, when one questions one's faith and somehow needs to find comfort, it often helps to turn to the DoTheTon forum, the cafe racer's bible equivalent. Within these pages I managed  to find succour and guidance in the words of Korsch the rear brake guru and prophet. He has written a how-to guide of such detailed prose and accompanied by such exquisitely rendered pictures that it is enough to make a grown man weep. I have studied his teachings with the meticulousness of a born-again convert and have found them to be of such high calibre and usefulness that I have shamelessly copied his ideas and when finished will present them to my friends as my own.  I would encourage you all to do the same. His solution here

http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=34650.30

And my plagiarised (and not yet completed) version
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6186.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6191.jpg)

So that's all for now :) Thanks for reading!!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: Korsch_RS on Apr 09, 2012, 12:09:40
In these difficult times of self doubt, when one questions one's faith and somehow needs to find comfort, it often helps to turn to the DoTheTon forum, the cafe racer's bible equivalent. Within these pages I managed  to find succour and guidance in the words of Korsch the rear brake guru and prophet. He has written a how-to guide of such detailed prose and accompanied by such exquisitely rendered pictures that it is enough to make a grown man weep. I have studied his teachings with the meticulousness of a born-again convert and have found them to be of such high calibre and usefulness that I have shamelessly copied his ideas and when finished will present them to my friends as my own.  I would encourage you all to do the same. His solution here

http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=34650.30

Haha just glad i could help! feel free to plagiarise all you like :) You will probably be the guinea pig finding out if this idea will actually work or not, as unfortunately I have to do some traveling for work so will not be able to work on the bike for a while :( Hopefully i will be able to use the hotel time to at least fix all those picture links!

Keep up the good work!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Apr 18, 2012, 07:39:01
To my thousands of fans and followers I'd like to apologise for the lack of updates recently. Sadly work on the CB 350 has ground to a halt...

First I had to get my race bike ready for an Easter meeting and then I was away for a week working in the country. Here's the 848 all loaded up and ready to go

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6201.jpg)

and here's a link to a video of my first race

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sVgEol2XbxE

Unfortunately it was the only race that went well. An intermittent electrical misfire ruined the others :(

A few goodies arrived in the post though. Maybe this weekend I'll be able to get some work done.

Loaded Gun rearsets
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6206.jpg)

Rear sprocket bolts and a steering damper bracket
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6207.jpg)

I've been thinking about what I want the gauges to look like and I came up with the idea of replica Veglia tachometer/speedo faces like these. Hopefully Sonreir will be able to help out!
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/1972-giu-motociclismo-09.jpg)

That's all for now. With any luck I'll have something a little more substantial for the next update


Title: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: neevo on Apr 18, 2012, 07:42:08
Not good enough! Pull your finger out.

And that 848 is a gorgeous weapon.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Apr 18, 2012, 07:51:13
HAHA!! Yes I know Neevo I know...not good enough. And yes the 848 is a great bike and way more than I'm capable of riding to it's full capability! One simply does one's best...
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: MickyC on Apr 18, 2012, 07:59:08
awsome video mate, embarrassingly i was in the office watching it tilting my head on every turn you were making to me peers amusement.  hahah well done
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Apr 27, 2012, 07:21:56

It's been a while since my last update to this blog. Sorry to all my fans but hey, give me a break and stop hassling me! Life gets in the way sometimes! But now, work proceeds apace!! I've got some serious momentum going so you just watch me roll, baby!

Finally got the rear brake worked out. From back to front, the stock brake drum lever is connected to the actuating lever by the stock connecting link. All original so far. Then the foot brake lever has been cut off and a tube extension welded onto the stock actuating mechanism. The tube extension allows the stock bolt to be used to bolt the actuating mechanism to the frame in it's original position but allows another actuating lever to be welded further out from the midline of the bike so as to line up with the rear set brake lever. I'm not entirely sure if this all makes sense but I do know it all works very nicely and is an elegant solution to the problem of getting the rear brake to work with rear sets. Thanks to Korsch for the idea.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6217.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6228.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6227.jpg)

Once the whole mechanism is painted the same colour as the frame, it will all blend in and be less noticeable than in the photos. The stock actuating arm is quite close to the dust cover of the swing arm bushes so when it all gets put back together for the final time I'll grind a bit off the arm to give some clearance.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6218.jpg)

Rear wheel arrived back from being laced and trued. It looks fantastic but unfortunately it doesn't spin true. Big wobble in it so it's gone back to be re-done.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6220.jpg)

Front wheel also back and also looks good. Spins nice
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6226.jpg)

How the mock up looks so far. I think the headlight is too high and sticks out to far so I'm going to lower and shorten the headlight brackets
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6226-1.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6230.jpg)

More to follow...
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Apr 27, 2012, 08:08:09
I've been spending a bit of time thinking about how to stop water, mud, crap and cowshit from flying up from the back wheel into the carburettors. I want to put some sort of mudguard on but preferably a subtle and unobtrusive one. A swing arm mounted hugger of some description seems like a good idea. The stock mudguard weighs a ton so is not really a viable option. Cut in half it might fit nicely and would then only weigh half a ton.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6232.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6233.jpg)

Then I thought I'd do one of my favourite things…make it out of fibreglass. Used the old mudguard to get the shape and away we went. I love the fibreglass resin fumes. In between hallucinations and violent projectile vomiting (I exaggerate) I managed to make something that MIGHT be useful.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6238.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6239.jpg)

While the fibreglass was going off I moved to the front end of the bike and lowered and shortened the headlight brackets.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6245.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6248.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6249.jpg)

Started working on some brackets to hold the speedo and tacho
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6241.jpg)

Whenever I work in metal fabrication, I am reminded to not give up my day job. But eventually got the gauge mounting sorted out and quite pleased with the result.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6250.jpg)

I've struck a problem with the fitting of the BCR El Poquito tank. It is supplied with a bracket with two rubber mounts for the tank to rest on and to be bolted to.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6225.jpg)

Unfortunately the tank does not rest on these rubber stoppers but rests on the frame rail on each side just behind the fuel tap holes. This leaves a gap of approx 5mm between the tank and the rubber mounts. Hard to photograph…
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6223.jpg)

One solution would be to raise the bracket high enough for the tank to rest on it rather than rest on the frame rails but as you can see in this side on picture, the line of the lower edge of the tank is already too high to match the line of the seat. The tank wants to be lowered not raised!!
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6222.jpg)

I'm thinking I have to  grind the tank away enough to allow it to be lowered  onto the rubber mounts and to line up with the seat BUT to still clear the frame rails. Grinding this much of the tank away may mean grinding INTO the tank making fuel-proof repairs necessary. The alternative would be to heat up the frame rail at the appropriate point and smash it with a large hammer to bend it inward enough to allow the tank to sit lower. Neither of these options is attractive. Hmmm...anyone got any bright ideas?
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Apr 27, 2012, 08:27:34
The other thing I'm worried about is the clearance between the rear tyre and the BCR seat pan/battery tray. I haven't had a tyre on the wheel yet to check at full compression but it looks to me like there are going to be some issues. Longer shock or raise the tray? Bit annoying really as the BCR tray is supposedly made for CB350
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6221.jpg)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Apr 29, 2012, 09:22:18
A major victory was won today in the bike building battlefield that is my garage. The problem of mounting my tank has been resolved. No more sleepless nights and no more staring blankly into space mentally wrestling with the complexity of the problem.

Those who have been paying attention will remember that the tank was resting on two frame rails instead of the rubber stoppers that are supposed to simultaneously bear the weight of the tank and isolate (to a degree) vibrations from the frame. The possible solutions:

1. Raise the stoppers higher so the tank rests on them and not the frame (not particularly desirable as the tank would then be sitting "abnormally" high. This abnormally high position could be "hidden" by fibreglassing a lip around the lower edge of the tank to make it look like it is sitting lower

2. Move the frame rail slightly with a big hammer to allow the tank to sit lower (not an especially elegant engineering solution)

3. Remove some of the inner edge of the tank with a big grinder (and run the risk that so much of the tank gets removed that it no longer capable of containing volatile and highly flammable and corrosive liquids i.e. I may grind right through to the inside of the tank)

The first option was considered for approximately a microsecond before being dismissed (such is my love of fibreglassing). With respect to the remaining two potential solutions, the stress of indecision was giving me stomach ulcers so I immediately decided that to do SOMETHING was preferable to doing nothing. So I tossed a coin and heads told me it was going to be option 3, grinding the tank away.

So I carefully marked the tank where it was hitting the frame and estimated how much needed to be removed to clear the frame
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6256.jpg)

Then with my dremel in hand and my heart in my mouth I started to cut into the tank
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6261.jpg)

Both sides cut away and no sign of having entered the interior of the tank. :) Whew!!
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6270.jpg)

 I don't know how thick the remaining material is but it feels pretty solid. There's plenty of clearance now so I may just run a bit of resin over the cut back sections just to be sure they're fuel-tight.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6266.jpg)

Tank/seat continuity line looks neat and the tank is resting on the rubber!
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6271.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6286.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6289.jpg)

Next victory was completing my rear hugger. The first stage (previously posted) used part of the rear mudguard as a plug. I then attached stage 1 to the swing arm along with the chain guard and used that as a plug for stage 2
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6251.jpg)

Popped it off the plug (pulled some paint off with it)...
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6252.jpg)

After a bit of filing, the end result fits perfectly. Still needs filler, sanding, painting etc. All that boring stuff
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6255.jpg)

Next in this epic weekend of achievement was the mounting of rear indicators, license plate holder, license plate light and tail light. The indicators and license plate mount is from the 848.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6272.jpg)

I had to cut the top part off and then fabricated a nice little bracket from the chopped up old battery box to mount the whole assembly at the back of the seat hoop
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6283.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6279.jpg)

Now just waiting to get my rear wheel back from re-truing so I can get a tyre on it so I can check clearance of the tyre with the rear seat pan so I can send the frame, swing arm etc for painting so I can finish this bloody thing...

That's all for now folks!
Title: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: Korsch_RS on Apr 29, 2012, 12:13:19
Looks great! I love that tank and seat combo, glad you figured out how to make it work.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: K.C. Stoaner on May 12, 2012, 01:26:06
To my thousands of fans and followers I'd like to apologise for the lack of updates recently. Sadly work on the CB 350 has ground to a halt...

First I had to get my race bike ready for an Easter meeting and then I was away for a week working in the country. Here's the 848 all loaded up and ready to go

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6201.jpg)


And here's a link to footage of you racing last year; at the end is the race where you picked up those scratches under the 848 insignia !   
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9MX0qpSpKmY

Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on May 12, 2012, 05:06:18
Oh my God!! Is there no end to the slander and rumour-mongering amongst the paparazzi who follow me constantly?

I don't see any crash in the footage you posted KC! All I see is me having to be picked up when a little electrical problem forced me to pull off the track and be picked up by the retrieval vehicle at the end of the race. And even if (IF KC, IF...) needing to be picked up was the result of a teeny weeny little crash, there is a popular saying that says if you're not crashing every now and then, you're just not going hard enough. Not that it applies in this case. At all.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: andycafe on May 12, 2012, 05:43:49
LOL nice to see a member having a crack, even with those rumoured electrical issues  ;D
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on May 28, 2012, 09:57:37
Yes Andy, you have to have a go don't you, otherwise what's the point of all this time we spend in the shed tinkering on the two wheeled beasties? You have to get out there and rev it to the red every now and then!

So if you had to choose just one bike that you've had in your life that you sold and regretted ever since which would it be? Which one would you give your left testicle to have back again? For me it would be my Ducati TT2 race bike (identical to the one in my avatar). In honour of the memory of that beautiful bike, I decided I would make my speedo/tacho faces to be Veglia replicas courtesy of the awesome Sonreir who made them for me for the grand sum of $25. Honestly, all you bike builders, do yourselves a favour and get in touch with Sonreir (on this forum) and order some speedo/tacho faces made to your own custom design. He will reply to your message in a matter of seconds, will have the first prototype drawn up and emailled back to you within minutes and will revise his work 2, 3, 4, 5 times or as many times as it takes to get the perfect end result.  Here' are some pics.

Stickers as they arrived in the post

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6398.jpg)

Preparing the needles for painting (can't have white needles with a white face!!)…

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6293.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6294.jpg)

Installed after an epic battle to refit the outer casings (pity about the cracked plastic face on the tacho but helps make it look old I guess)…

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6407.jpg)

With the strip LEDs connected to 12V (cracked plastic a little less noticeable with the backlight)…

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6408.jpg)

Got a few more things done over the weekend. New Tyres!! Woohoo! Bridgestone BT45 18 130/80 rear, 18 100/80 front. I have not added up how much it has cost to get these two wheels to this final state and I have no intention of doing so.

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6337.jpg)

Brake fluid reservoir from DanMoto arrived from the US

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6336.jpg)

My tank stickers from Malta…

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6338.jpg)
Title: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: neevo on May 28, 2012, 10:12:00
Those tank stickers are awesome!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on May 28, 2012, 10:12:04
The major issue for the weekend however was dealing with the following problem.

Problem…

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6341.jpg)

The lack of clearance between the tyre and the seat pan has had me tearing my hair out. Luckily I have a lot of hair and have been able to cope (sort of). Here is my solution…

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6378.jpg)

I cut a hole in the seat pan (my angle grinder is my new best friend) more or less the shape of the tyre profile to accommodate the tyre as it rises during compression. This has created a couple of problems not the least of which is the giant hole that will now allows all sorts of road grime, stones, water, mud, road kill etc to contaminate the under seat area. So a cover has had to be manufactured from fibreglass, my favourite material.

First a layer of aluminium foil to cover the tyre…

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6379.jpg)

I have to confess to being just a little nervous about pouring a fast setting resin over the top of my brand new tyre and hideously expensive wheel but it all worked out ok.

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6380.jpg)

Popped it out after a couple of hours…

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6381.jpg)

And started trimming…

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6383.jpg)

Now all fits beautifully but forgot to take a photo of the finished product. Also had to raise the battery box because the raised and now curved seat pan could not be raised high enough with it in place. Also had to move the number plate/rear indicator hanger further rearward to make room for the tyre.The problem of the tyre hitting the seat pan is now 90% solved but the it still hits at full compression particularly when the wheel is all the way forward or all the way back in the swing arm. It's a bit annoying to have had to spend so much time to make this fit when the seat pan/frame loop was supposedly made by BCR specifically for the CB350. I can't see how it could ever fit without major adjustments. If anyone has bought the BCR seat pan/loop/battery box and fitted it, I'd be interested to hear how.

Anyway, I now have a rolling chassis with rear suspension that almost works…

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6384.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6394.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_6386.jpg)

Looks a little high in the front/low in the rear. Will only know when I get  chance to measure things up.  Also the rear REALLY squats down when I sit on it. Uses up about half the available travel if not a little more. This last fact has got me thinking that I may have mixed up the fork springs with my shock springs because it CAN"T be right the way it is. Feels way undersprung. I'll have to dig out the other springs I have and see if they are really the rear shock springs and the ones on it are actually the stock fork springs!! That'd be awkward... :-[ :-[ :-[ :-[ :-[  ::) ::) ::) ::)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on May 28, 2012, 10:35:14
Yes the longer rear shock has been in the back of my mind for a while but I was going to try and avoid it if possible. Also plenty of room on the fork legs for dropping front (i.e. raising forks through triples) but not sure about the travel and whether there is room for a mudguard above the tyre and still allow travel without hitting lower triple. I'll have to measure. The problem is the forks were made for low profile radial tyres on 17 inch wheels, not a high profile tyre on 18 inch rim!

The good thing about a flat pan under the seat is that it's easy to bolt electrical components to it...oh well, no big deal. Just have to find somewhere else for the bits and pieces....
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: sinbad85 on May 28, 2012, 10:51:16
just found this build!

nice one!
ill be having a geeze from now on.
great idea with the tyre mold in the undertray!
looks like its going to be killer!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on May 28, 2012, 18:15:48
Quote
just found this build!

nice one!
ill be having a geeze from now on.
great idea with the tyre mold in the undertray!
looks like its going to be killer!

Hey thx Sinbad. Just had a quick look at your KZ, I'll have to go have a proper look later. Lots going on there!

Swivel had a look at your build thread too. Lots going on there as well!! ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: MickyC on May 29, 2012, 00:33:29
Progressing like a steam train mate you are flying along if i ever need fibreglass help i know who i will ask first lol. Well done mate you should be proud cant wait to see her on the road.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: andycafe on May 29, 2012, 00:54:57
Liking it! shame the hub that could be polished up is hidden behind 2 MASSIVE brake discs  :D

You may recognize this bike from your local coffee shop?
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: MickyC on May 29, 2012, 02:09:26
im guessing he wanted $16999 for it lol ????
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on May 29, 2012, 02:14:49
Recognise the shop but not the bike! If it was $16999 it'd be one of the cheaper ones ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: andycafe on May 29, 2012, 02:18:26
im guessing he wanted $16999 for it lol ????

haha probably, my pockets certainly aren't deep enough :( but it was the inspiration for my cafe :D
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: andycafe on May 29, 2012, 02:21:25
Recognise the shop but not the bike! If it was $16999 it'd be one of the cheaper ones ;D ;D ;D

lol probably should have mentioned the pic was back @ Christmas 07' and all I could afford was a pack of stickers and my Bro in law gave me a deus tee for xmas  ;D
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: MickyC on May 29, 2012, 02:23:19
haha probably, my pockets certainly aren't deep enough :( but it was the inspiration for my cafe :D

hahaha don’t get me wrong i love the bikes and the style and what they stand for just not the price. good inspiration

we all will have to go for a coffee there and catch up on our finished projects
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: andycafe on May 29, 2012, 02:31:34
we all will have to go for a coffee there and catch up on our finished projects

I like it, I would trailer it up from melb unless I get excited and organise a few riders and a chace car (just in case lol.)

Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: sinbad85 on May 29, 2012, 09:18:08
they call it "temple of enthusiasm"
 i call it "temple of inspiration".....

wouldnt it be nice if we could sell ours for their prices (although i wouldnt anyway)

i have bought a few goodies from there i must admit.....paid too much but hey.....the service i got from taka (their japanese
parts specialist) was awesome.....

ill go back there for a coffee for sure! and a chat with taka
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: andycafe on May 29, 2012, 10:16:59
Lol all you NSW boys have probably been in there at the same time at different stages and didn't even know it, probably should get a DTT patch for next time your in for a coffee  ???
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: sinbad85 on May 29, 2012, 11:05:02
i was thinking of getting a dtt patch.....
might have too now
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: smvirili on May 30, 2012, 22:54:54
hate walking in there. feel like the biggest tight arse hahah
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: andycafe on May 31, 2012, 04:59:16
hate walking in there. feel like the biggest tight arse hahah

Lol  ;D  haha I know right  ;D
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Jun 06, 2012, 09:19:13
Sorry no pictures for this update...

I had a look around the mess that I call the work space in my garage and found the "other" pair of springs that I thought were the fork springs. Well, it seems that they are actually the rear shock springs and what I currently have on the rear shocks are in fact the fork springs. With the correct (and much stiffer) springs now mounted on the rear shocks, the rear travel feels much more normal. Also the lack of rebound damping in the shocks is now much more obvious with the stiffer springs. It's a little embarrassing to have got them mixed up but, yeah... whatever... :- :P :P

Having the rolling chassis all together has been a real novelty because up until now whenever I want to move the bloody thing I have to lift it. Now I can wheel it all around the back yard making engine noises which has been almost as much fun as riding! I somehow resisted the temptation to wheel it into the living room so I could watch TV while working on it. It has also given me the chance to test out the side stand and it appears that the original CB350 side stand is too short when attached to my relocated (higher and further forward) mounting position. This allows the bike to lean over too far. So using a tricky sleight of hand involving spacers, drilling holes and cutting threads I've managed to fit the longer 848 stand using the CB350 pivot bolt. This stand has the added benefit of being made of aluminium and therefore being lighter.

Before pulling the rolling chassis apart to send off to be painted, I took the opportunity to measure up the geometry to get a rough idea of where the bike is at. In order to do this I had the bike supported so that both the front and rear suspension were at full extension but with the tyres still just touching the ground.

I first measured the vertical height from the bottom of the steering head. Then using a laser pointer I measured the distance from the centre of the steering head to the ground along a line parallel to the centre line of the steering head. Then using a theorem devised by a good friend of mine Pythagorus to work out the steering head angle. My measurement for the steering head angle was 32 degrees to the vertical. The honda manual tells me that the "caster angle" is 63 degrees. I'm assuming that the caster angle referred to is the steering head angle relative to the horizontal which converts to 27 degrees to the vertical. So pretty close but according to my measurements my front end wants to be lower or rear end higher to get the steering head angle back to standard.

This is a little confusing though because I have gone to a smaller wheel (18in vs 19in) which in theory should drop the front and steepen the steering head. But other things have also changed that could influence the steering head angle. For example the 848 forks vs CB 350 forks. Measuring the forks (from axle to lower triple clamp distance) gave 848 450mm vs CB350 498mm. So the 848 forks are shorter and therefore lower the front and steepen the steering head also! Mmmm ??? ??? ??? ??? ???

I then worked out the trail to be 173mm and it was at this stage that I decided I needed to maybe re-check my measurements because even the 848 triple clamp offset of 36 mm vs CB350 offset of 60mm would not account for 173 mm of trail! So my measurements are screwed and I'll need to do it all again. The only problem with that is that the frame, swingarm and various brackets are now off being blasted and painted. So it'll have to wait for now.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: axeugene27 on Jun 16, 2012, 19:18:00
You don't think that the double disc brake in the front is a tad bit excessive for a 300 lb bike
Title: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: neevo on Jun 16, 2012, 21:22:30
You don't think that the double disc brake in the front is a tad bit excessive for a 300 lb bike

Are you insane ;)

Of course it's excessive... wonderfully excessive!!!!!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Jun 16, 2012, 21:47:52
Quote
You don't think that the double disc brake in the front is a tad bit excessive for a 300 lb bike

Yes but you know what they say...nothing exceeds like excess. ;D ;D ;D

Besides I figured the piston size of the master cylinder is suitably matched to twin calipers. Changing to one caliper without changing the master cylinder will make the front brakes lack feel. A single disc on this bike of course will have plenty of braking power but I don't really want to go to the expense of buying another master cylinder to match single disc.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: pandknz on Jul 09, 2012, 02:44:14
Great build, very inspiring!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: andycafe on Jul 12, 2012, 07:46:21
Sorry no pictures for this update...
 

must be time for a couple of pic's and an update eh?  ;)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Jul 12, 2012, 18:08:28
Yes it is time but it's not going to happen for while. Frame and swing arm are off being painted with an estimated finish date of god knows when...
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Jul 25, 2012, 03:38:29
YEEEESSSSSSSSSS!!!!!!!!! :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :)

Got my frame and swing arm and various brackets back from painting. Sand blasted, prepped, and sprayed in two pack enamel, metallic grey with a satin finish in the manner of modern ducati frames. And it only took him 2 months (he's a VERY busy man...  ::) but we won't go there). Looks fantastic!!

So looks like I'll be having a busy weekend in the garage. Engine in frame, back end on, front end on, make a wiring loom, locate electrical bits and pieces and we're just about done... Now have to decide on a colour for the tank and seat unit.

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7681.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7683.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7684.jpg)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: MickyC on Jul 25, 2012, 04:25:18
looking wicked its like a gunmetal i dig it heaps getting close mate
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: axeugene27 on Jul 26, 2012, 16:57:09
can't wait to see it come together again.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: freedomgli on Jul 26, 2012, 17:37:07
Nice project, man!  Keep up the good work!

I then worked out the trail to be 173mm and it was at this stage that I decided I needed to maybe re-check my measurements because even the 848 triple clamp offset of 36 mm vs CB350 offset of 60mm would not account for 173 mm of trail! So my measurements are screwed and I'll need to do it all again.
I'm also trying to understand my geometry and how it is changing as I swap forks, triple clamps, etc.  In the Honda manual I'm not sure what to make of their specification for "Trail length."  Is it ground trail?  Or real trail?  I assume it's ground trail.  I've been using both Tony Foale's Steering Geometry Calculator and RB Racing's Advanced Trail Calculator and I'm not able to back track Honda's trail length calculations using either tool.  I understand the CB350 fork offset is 60 mm (2.36 in) but in order to achieve a ground trail of 85 mm (3.35 in) with a 90/90-18 tire and 27° rake then the fork offset must be 64.8 mm (2.55 in).  I don't have the parts and a caliper sitting in front of me so I can't verify the measurements myself!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Jul 26, 2012, 18:25:52
Thanks for the comments gents

I've been piecing things back together over the last couple of days, photos to follow.

Quote
I'm also trying to understand my geometry and how it is changing as I swap forks, triple clamps, etc.  In the Honda manual I'm not sure what to make of their specification for "Trail length."  Is it ground trail?  Or real trail?  I assume it's ground trail.  I've been using both Tony Foale's Steering Geometry Calculator and RB Racing's Advanced Trail Calculator and I'm not able to back track Honda's trail length calculations using either tool.  I understand the CB350 fork offset is 60 mm (2.36 in) but in order to achieve a ground trail of 85 mm (3.35 in) with a 90/90-18 tire and 27° rake then the fork offset must be 64.8 mm (2.55 in).  I don't have the parts and a caliper sitting in front of me so I can't verify the measurements myself!

For a novice like me, working out the geometry hurts my head and everything somehow gets tangled up in my brain. When I measured my geometry I simply used a tape measure and a laser pointer, drew a triangle and worked out angles using Pythagoras Theorum.  The important thing is to make sure you measure with the suspension at full extension but with tyres just touching the ground as having the weight of the bike compressing the springs alters rake, trail and ride height. I have not used a trail calculator before and might have to look at one of the ones you mentioned to see if it helps.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: andycafe on Jul 27, 2012, 02:37:04
Nice, ive been looking forward to seeing this come together, Don't be hy with the updates either lol..... :D
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: hillsy on Jul 27, 2012, 06:09:19

For a novice like me, working out the geometry hurts my head and everything somehow gets tangled up in my brain.


Mate - don't overthink it. The new forks you have are pretty close to what was there originally as far as length, rake / trail, etc. If you were raking the front end and adding 6" over forks then you might be concerned, but what you have there will only be an improvement on the clapped-out 40 year old suspension you had prior to the swap.


And what are you going to do if you calculate you need another 8mm of trail anyway??


Carry on - it's looking pretty damn good  ;)


Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Jul 27, 2012, 07:48:43
I take your point Hillsy about over thinking things. But I do like to learn about these things as much as I can and to understand what happens when changing various parameters. 

After making so many changes to the hardware that influences geometry, the only way for me to know if I am "pretty close" to original geometry is to measure where I'm at. There are plenty of adjustments available to alter geometry if required, not the least of which is what length rear shocks I need to get. The original ones I have at the moment are the original sealed, non-rebuildable units which are now 42 years old and don't really seem to have any damping properties at all!! If I'm going to buy new shocks, the geometry of the bike as it currently sits will determine what length I need to get.

Anyway, the geometry is an issue for another day.  No work today meant today was a day spent in the garage with the music up loud and the phone switched off. And this evening is the time for a massive update as progress on a monumental scale base been made.

First off, got the engine in the frame. A little hint for anybody trying to do this without scratching the freshly painted frame or cases. It is a job that is one million percent easier with the starter motor and exhaust studs removed and the engine lying on it's side. Then just lower the frame on top, slight rotation, slide your engine bolts in and your done.

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7688.jpg)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7690.jpg)

Front end on next. Plenty of grease on the new tapered roller bearings and torqued to spec

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7696.jpg)

Next job was the swing arm. But first I had to install the new brass swing arm bushes. Put the new bushes in the freezer next to the frozen peas to shrink them (the bushes, not the peas)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7686.jpg)

While the new bushes are freezing, knock the old ones out

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7687.jpg)

If you're a clumsy git, you will damage the interior of the swing arm when knocking the old bushes out

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7693.jpg)

This will make pressing the new ones in very difficult, so sand down the damage

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7694.jpg)

Knock the new (and now frozen) bushes in nice and easy. Take them out of the freezer one at a time and knock them in otherwise the last couple will have warmed up too much to easily go in. Voila!

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7695.jpg)


Swingarm on next, don't forget the dust covers, grease nipples and LOTS of grease. Crank it up tight (How tight? FT!)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7698.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7699.jpg)

Top engine bracket and lovely new stainless bolts

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7700.jpg)

New Dyna coils and horn

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7702.jpg)

Loaded Gun foot pegs and wheels on

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7704.jpg)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Jul 27, 2012, 08:08:03
With the basic nuts and bolts back in position, it's now time to move on to the electrical bits and pieces

AntiGravity Battery under the seat hump. I'll be tearing the yellow paper off the sticky side of the foam padding

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7705.jpg)

In trying to workout where to mount the electronic ignition control unit, I realised that I don't have a flat section big enough to mount it to. When I cut the flat seat pan out to allow more rear wheel travel, it inadvertently removed the only flat section to mount it. So I had to work out where I could put it. Below the tank and above the carburettors there is a big open space where I decided it could easily go. Not having any sheet metal, I racked my brains and searched the garage and found this old toaster that would perfectly do the job

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7711.jpg)

Cut the side off

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7712.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7713.jpg)

And cut to shape

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7714.jpg)

Drill some holes

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7718.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7719.jpg)

Voila!! Magnifico!!

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7720.jpg)

All to mount this thing

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7717.jpg)

And then….onto the wiring loom. Starting from scratch. Who would've ever thought that wiring a 40 year old motorcycle from scratch could provide such unbridled joy?

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7722.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7723.jpg)

So that's where I'm at. More wiring tomorrow and with any luck I'll get it finished (the wiring that is)
Title: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: neevo on Jul 27, 2012, 08:37:14
ducatiboy what rear tyre are you running? Any pics from the rear?
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: hillsy on Jul 27, 2012, 09:03:28
Looks like a BT45 Battlax??
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: MickyC on Jul 27, 2012, 20:32:56
nice one,  updates are great she will look sooooo good
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Jul 27, 2012, 20:44:03
yes rear tyre is BT45 Battleax 130/80 18 on 3 inch rim
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: mnraider on Aug 02, 2012, 00:53:48
I love the toaster idea way to use what you have.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Aug 05, 2012, 07:42:47
If someone says to you that you can rewire a 40 year old motorcycle in half a day, my advice would be to tell them to fuck off and take their head out of their arse. I've spent about 30 hours on making a wiring loom and it's STILL NOT DONE!! :P :P Maybe it's just me… I never really understood electrons. They're too small. And too negative. I like to stay positive and not surround myself with such negativity. Maybe that's why it's taken me so long. ::)

Anyway….here's an update. Half the time was spent trying to make sense of the original wiring diagram. This is the diagram that has some positive wires in red and some in black!! :o First I worked out where I needed wires to go and ended up with wires all over the place. Then I started working out how to tidy it all up. It's easy really. Measure, cut, feed through frame, strip the end, crimp on the connector, solder, apply heat shrink, cover with cable routing tubing, secure with cable ties. Then undo it all and re-route it somewhere that looks "better". Repeat 15,000 times...

Battery box/rear section all wired and tidied up.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7864.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7865.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7863.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7970.jpg)

This left the front needing a little love
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7867.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7866.jpg)

Front done more or less
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7968.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7972.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7973.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7974.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7976.jpg)

Leaving my garage looking like this…
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7971.jpg)

Believe it or not this little bracket to adapt the CB350 front brake switch to the 848 master cylinder took me about 2 hours to make. In the same way that wiring is not my strong point, it appears that metal fabrication isn't either. Sometimes I'm left wondering what my strong point is!?!
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7966.jpg)

I want to have the ability to switch my head light on or off but since I'm using the 848 left switch block, there is no on/off switch, only hi/low beam. So i decided to put my own on/off switch into the circuit. It will be a push button on/off mounted in the top of the steering stem locking nut with the wires running throughout the steering stem and emerging below the bottom triple clamp. Just have to find a 16mm drill bit to drill the top of the big mofo nut. 8)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_7967.jpg)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Aug 05, 2012, 19:12:33
Funny thing happened in the garage yesterday. While I was making the wiring loom I had the negative terminal of the battery disconnected for safety reasons. Then I connected it up and switched the key on to check that various points of the system were getting power when they were supposed to. Because I don't have my "ignition on" idiot light wired up yet I forget that the battery was connected and the key on while I was getting on with the next job. My son happened to come into the garage and was playing around and pressed the starter button. The starter motor instantly sprang into life spinning madly and confirming for me that the solenoid switch, starter motor and starter circuit are all functional. I had a minor heart attack when the starter started spinning because there is no oil in the motor. Didn't take long to realise that the engine wasn't turning over because the starter chain is not on the cog because I had the starter motor off the engine when I was putting the engine in the frame as it makes the installation easier. I had bolted the starter motor back on but still need to get under the left side cover to connect the chain up.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: MickyC on Aug 05, 2012, 22:47:47
hahaha the floor looks like a wiring nightmare. you can do mine if you like mate nice job 30hr's would be painful but it was well worth it in the long run as it looks great.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Aug 08, 2012, 09:26:31
Deepwater, I think I would run a mile before taking on another wiring project. Soooo tedious and slow. I'm very satisfied though to have got it done and to have it all work now. And first go!! 8) 8)

When I said the wiring was finished, of course I didn't mean TOTALLY finished. Just meant pretty much mostly finished except for the bits that weren't finished.

BUT NOW it really is completely totally done. Nothing left to do. Lights, starter motor, starter button, indicators, idiot lights, instrument lights, regulator/rectifier, front/rear brake switches, battery, solenoid etc etc

Not many photos to show but here's a couple of the way the headlight bucket looks. I wanted some fancy bright little LED idiot lights which I bought from Jaycar electronics. Green for neutral, 2 x orange for indicators and blue for high beam.

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8043.jpg)

The thread on each LED is not quite long enough to reach through the surprisingly thick plastic of the headlight bucket so I had to grind a well around each hole with the dremel so I could screw the nut on
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8041.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8040.jpg)

To avoid the LED going pop when connected to 12 volts one of these resistors has to be added into the positive wire on each light.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8049.jpg)

I found a great engine starter button to use on the headlight bucket instead of the right switch block.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8045.jpg)

All the lights now in place between the "Veglia" instruments
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8047.jpg)

I can't wait to get the odometer to 20000km so the ugly looking 1 will turn over into a 2!!

Now here's a question for any smart electrical boffins out there. I want the engine start button to light up when the ignition key is switched to the 'on' position and then to go off when the engine starts. Where should I pick up the live wire from to power the light in the switch so the light will go off when the engine starts? Anyone know?

Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: axeugene27 on Aug 08, 2012, 09:31:32
that engine start button looks awesome. I just kick mine
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: overdraft on Aug 08, 2012, 14:05:25
wow, this is so ambitious compared to my wiring... i just put the stock wires in that snap on casing and then added the led stuff for the turn signals/tail lights and put different connectors on the brake circuit to work with my new master. and those guages are gorgeous! nice work!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Aug 11, 2012, 07:02:11
A little more time spent in the garage today during a bitterly cold and windy Sydney day. Now that the electrical system is all connected up I found I could move on to simpler things like nuts and bolts and easy shit like that. I' m slowly getting closer and closer to the first start and I can hardly contain my excitement. I find myself finding just one more thing I need to do to keep putting it off because I'm too nervous that it's not going to work and the whole project will turn into a big fizzer.

Anyway, here's a few more pictures of progress.

I put my headlight on/off switch into the top of my steering head nut. It turned out to be more complicated than I thought because you can't plug the wires into the switch and then screw the nut down because as you screw the nut down, the wires become twisted inside the stem. So i had to put a separate plug into the loom where the switch wires join it. I think it was worth all the extra hassle
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8316.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8327.jpg)

Having moved the starter button to the top of the headlight bucket I had no need for the button incorporated into the right hand switch block. So I cut it off leaving just the kill switch
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8326.jpg)

Cool air filters. Can't wait to try and tune the carbs... :P :P
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8320.jpg)

Very large empty space allowing the rear tyre to direct rain gravel and dog shit into the carburettors
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8324.jpg)

Solved by my home made rear hugger
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8323.jpg)

After being expertly coated with this superior quality polymer coating product
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8322.jpg)

Front brakes installed but I've just now realised I don't have any banjo bolts to connect up the brake lines
Brake fluid reservoir
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8317.jpg)

Master cylinder
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8312.jpg)

Calipers
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8319.jpg)

Decided to get creative and used some oxygen tubing for float bowl overflow
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8315.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8313.jpg)

I've run into another little problem involving clearance of the speedo and tacho cables running behind the headlight bucket. Because I have shortened the headlight ears and brought the headlight bucket back towards the steering head there is very little to no room to run the cables which will run into the bucket about an inch below the cable attachment point
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8325.jpg)

I can either raise the instruments and/or alter the angle they are mounted or drill holes in the bucket and run the cables through it.

Still to go:
Mount the chain
Polish, clear coat and mount the hugger
Do something clever with (or just mount) the sprocket cover/clutch pushrod mechanism
Do something about a front mudguard
Check that there is a spark
Check static timing
Run a wire via a relay to the engine start button light.
Get some banjo bolts and bleed the front brakes
Mount the header pipes and work out what I'll do for a muffler
Decide on a colour scheme for the tank/seat and paint

That's all! Nearly done...
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: axeugene27 on Aug 11, 2012, 10:35:24
looking real nice ducatiboy. You will just have to tap the front brake with your pinky and that thing with come to a halt.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Aug 17, 2012, 00:55:41
Quote
You will just have to tap the front brake with your pinky and that thing with come to a halt.

Too right Ax. I'm still contemplating using just one disc but given that the master cylinder is the correct size for 2 discs, I'll get everything up and running with two and later maybe take one off and see how it feels with just one. Significant weight saving to remove  a disc and caliper!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Aug 17, 2012, 23:32:58
Making progress with all the bits and pieces that seem to take forever to get done.

Checked for a spark and found that it had gone AWOL. Turns out I hadn't wired in a positive to the coils (doh!) so I fixed that.

Mounted the beautiful new 530 x-ring chain
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8328.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8329.jpg)

I couldn't resist not using the standard toolbox so I had it painted along with the rest of the frame and mounted in the stock position
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8331.jpg)

Big earth below the right carb
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8332.jpg)

Rear brake linkage
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8333.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8334.jpg)

Kick starter but whoops...it hits the rear set at the end of it's travel! I'll have to figure out some way to solve that
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8335.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8336.jpg)

Header pipes mounted (not yet wrapped)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8373.jpg)


Still to do:

Banjo bolts for the front brake lines on order from Italy (848 brakes).
Have to sort out a front fender. The 848 guard I have won't fit because I have an 18 inch wheel instead of the 17 inch the guard is made for
Paint tank/seat
Fit speedo/tacho cables
Find some sort of mufflers
Start the damn thing!!




Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: axeugene27 on Aug 18, 2012, 01:08:00
I should prob get a toolbox mounted up on mine I have 2 layin around. God knows i need it with the old cb.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: overdraft on Aug 18, 2012, 03:22:36
cb360 kicker has the same spline and sticks out much further. I got one for mine and it easily clears my peg. should be available cheap on eBay or the local wrecker...
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Aug 18, 2012, 03:30:57
Quote
cb360 kicker has the same spline and sticks out much further. I got one for mine and it easily clears my peg. should be available cheap on eBay or the local wrecker...

Really?? That's cool. I'll have to look into it! Not sure I feel like dropping the motor and splitting the cases again at the moment but could be something for the future. At least I know the starter motor works so no real need for the kicker just yet.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: hillsy on Aug 18, 2012, 04:28:02
Really?? That's cool. I'll have to look into it! Not sure I feel like dropping the motor and splitting the cases again at the moment but could be something for the future. At least I know the starter motor works so no real need for the kicker just yet.


I think he means the kick lever, not the shaft. Should just be a bolt-on affair and no need to split cases.


Then again - good luck trying to find a CB360 kick lever at the wreckers  :o ....lol...
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: overdraft on Aug 18, 2012, 10:22:43
yup, 2 minute job! just bolt on the 360 kick arm... there are lots on eBay
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: Bert Jan on Aug 18, 2012, 13:28:06
Wow, just found this thread and you do some nice work! Great you are located near Deus too.. I would love to take a look over there :)

You've asked about the oil filter on one of the engine-reasemble-pages. Your question about the oil filter touching the round thingy in the cover at crank rpm. Yes it does, and it needs to be very snug to be able to get the oil to the top end. If it leaks there less pressure will be generated by the pump.

I hope the following is clear as i'm not that great with technical talk in a foreign language ;)

I'm not to keen on your solution with the rear brake. The part of tubing you fabbed up to bridge the gap between the primary and secondary arm looks weak to me? Also, the energy you put on it while braking will be transferred in a motion not ideal for your solution. I think you could get in trouble there as the tubing is not sufficiently braced. I think it will be pushed forward (it'll turn offcourse) while braking causing a jam at the point it turns in the frame instead of a nice turning motion. I strongly recommend an other solution, like for instance cable operation (make a little cable stopper on the rear brake) or a better linkage system with less space between the primary and secondary push rod.

I'm not a rocket scientist but i've done a lot of fabbing and i would not ride the bike with that rear brake as it might jam and lock the rear wheel.
But then again, you've got enough stopping poooowweeeeeeeeeeeerrrrrrr!!!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Aug 18, 2012, 23:06:21
Quote
I think he means the kick lever, not the shaft. Should just be a bolt-on affair and no need to split cases.

Ahhh yes....that makes more sense. For some reason I read it as needing a new (and longer) shaft not not lever. I'll have to check out the 'bay and see if I can pick one up

Thanks for your comments Bert. I am not at all averse to criticism and appreciate all comments especially when it is obvious that some thought has gone into being constructive! So it's all cool here! 8) 8)

With regard to the rear brake I agree that the tube that I have welded on may not be strong enough if the brake is used heavily. My main concern was that the welded on lever (i.e. the one most visible and furthest away from the frame) would deform or bend the tube when braking heavily because the tube is quite thin and unreinforced. If this were to happen however, I can't really see that the brake would lock on. I think the thing that will make this set-up usable is that with the dual discs up front the rear brake is generally not going to be required for full on hard braking. It will be only really be needed for hill starts, sitting at traffic lights etc

And thanks for the answer to the oil filter/pump spinning thing! It certainly seems to be an odd arrangement and is not particularly elegant as an engineering solution. Especially when considering that the oil feed to the head on this model is marginal at best as mentioned numerous times in this forum!!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Aug 19, 2012, 00:18:14
Further progress has been made on this seemingly never-ending project.

We really wanted to try and start this ridiculous bike because it has been sitting in the garage too long and it's about time it started burning some fuel and making some noise. I put the spark plugs in and then discovered that I don't have a 21mm plug spanner. Never mind, doesn't matter. Finger tight will do for now. Also I have not painted the tank yet and I didn't really want to intstall the fuel cocks and put petrol in the tank until it had been painted. So I jury rigged up a fuel hose and a funnel to the right carb, thinking for some reason that if one carb was connected then somehow both would fill. Then attempted a start for the first time!! Gave it full choke and hit the starter button. Very very exciting and what's more it actually started! My son made a video of this historic inaugural engine start. Here it is:

http://youtu.be/pufYRb7wd1o

As you can see the bike started after a few turns but ran on one cylinder only, not surprisingly the right cylinder which had the fuel hose attached! So we re-filled the right side then moved the hose over to the left and filled that one and hit the starter again. Boom! Fired right up and running on two!! SO EXCITED!! Here's the second start:

http://youtu.be/xXuIWnyPZ-w

Although unfortunately it looks like there may be a fairly major leak of oil coming from inside the ignition timing cover on the left side of the head. The engine went together so long ago that I have sort of forgotten what it looks like under that cover but it is not supposed to be an oil filled space. Maybe I have left the oil seal (number 19) out!! That's the next job
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/honda-cb350-super-sport-350-k2-general-export-rl-cylinder-head-cover-breaker-advancer_mediumma000170e02_1b26.jpg)

Definitely need some mufflers too. It's way loud as is...
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: axeugene27 on Aug 19, 2012, 10:55:56
awesome to get it going so easily. I got a full gasket kit from dcc for like $45. Includes alot of seals as well. Well worth it. Good little work partner you have got there.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: andycafe on Aug 20, 2012, 07:27:30
nice, bikes looking sweet, definitely like all the smiles in the workshop ;)
Title: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: neevo on Aug 20, 2012, 08:39:16
Your 50!!!!!!!!

Buuuuuuuullllllllll-shiiiiiiiiiiiit! Kid knows his stuff by the sounds of it, he's more than welcome round my way ;)

Are you running the stock ducati front fender? Any more info as I wondering whether I put a GSXR one on mine or custom make something around the cut down stocker I've got.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Aug 21, 2012, 08:04:29
Thanks guys, it was a great relief that it all started up first try. I'm still on a bit of a high about it to be honest!! Now I just want to get the bloody thing on the road.

Neevo, not running stock 848 front fender. I pulled the fender off my race bike and tried to get it to fit the CB but then realised it won't fit because it has an 18inch wheel rather than 17. It also looks much bulkier than what I want. Decided instead to make one. See below...

So next update with a few more photos of bits and pieces. First of all I took the side cover off the ignition timing on the right side of the head to try and trace the oil leak. This is what I found...
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8375.jpg)

The arrows show where the oil seal should be!! Yep...left it out :-[ :-[ :-[ :-[ Whoops!! Doesn't fill me with confidence for the rest of the engine's rebuild ::) Got a new 22x35x5mm from CBC Silverwater for $5. So everyone just move along now...nothing to see here...

Now that the oil leak mystery is solved I installed the clutch cable. But it is a mile too long...
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8385.jpg)

Can anyone point me to instructions on shortening clutch cables? There's no way I can hide this one under the tank!

Right side handle bar has been given some love. Pro-grips, bar end mirror and a shorty adjustable brake lever I had lying around
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8386.jpg)

On to the problem of the front mudguard. I decided to make one out of fibreglass. First lined the inside of the original mudguard with alfoil
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8376.jpg)

Filled it up with resin and 2 layers of chopped strand
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8379.jpg)

Popped it out 2 hours later
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8380.jpg)

Peeled off the alfoil...one of these days I'm going to work out how to line the plug with something so the fibreglass part will pop out easily without aluminium foil stuck all over it
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8381.jpg)

Trimmed it down to the rough shape
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8382.jpg)

What it will look like on the bike
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8383.jpg)

Smothered in body filler...I added a bit too much catalyst so it set before I had a chance to smooth it out. Nothing a big bastard file won't fix!! Filing and sanding to smooth it all out will be next
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8384.jpg)


So that's all for now. Progressing at a snail's pace...

Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: M.B Co on Aug 21, 2012, 14:19:51
I love this build. Great quality photo's, awesome attention to detail

*high five*
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: neevo on Aug 21, 2012, 22:21:49
Neevo, not running stock 848 front fender. I pulled the fender off my race bike and tried to get it to fit the CB but then realised it won't fit because it has an 18inch wheel rather than 17. It also looks much bulkier than what I want. Decided instead to make one. See below...

Ah got it. I assume the black one on the bike in the videos is the one for the 17" wheel. Didn't think about that, that means my option of using a GSXR one is out too. Thanks for the info.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Aug 22, 2012, 07:59:12
Yep right Neevo. The one in the video was just resting there after I'd been trying it for size before realising it wasn't going to bolt straight on. If I were you I wouldn't completely dismiss the possibility of using the GSXR guard on your build. It WOULD be possible to fit it using some sort of modifying bracket to raise the mudguard only by about 10mm or so to clear the tyre. I just took the view that if I was going to have to frig around getting my 848 guard to fit, I may as well frig around making one that will end up looking the way I want it to.

One of the problems with going with my manufactured front guard is that it offers no protection to the fork stanchions leaving them exposed to stone chips etc :P
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: MickyC on Aug 22, 2012, 08:05:38
Mate that's awesome vid is great.
Title: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: neevo on Aug 22, 2012, 09:43:58
One of the problems with going with my manufactured front guard is that it offers no protection to the fork stanchions leaving them exposed to stone chips etc :P

Good point. Might re look at the standard GSXR fender again then. Good idea re the spacers to lift it a touch.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: axeugene27 on Aug 24, 2012, 00:22:35
just pick up a clutch cable from dcc right for the bike it's like 15 bux. customizing cables to length is a bitch.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: hillsy on Aug 24, 2012, 00:48:19
Be nice if DCC was just around the corner.
 
Go to a bike shop and get a screw on ferrule for your clutch cable end. Then shorten the cable and screw the new end on.
 
Or go to a wreckers with your current cable and see if they have a shorter one.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Aug 27, 2012, 04:45:07
Thanks for the suggestions guys but I ultimately went in a different direction.

After hours and hours of intensive internet searching I found a way of shortening the cable. Read on for the exciting details below:

First I disconnected the cable from the clutch lever end and routed the cable where I wanted it to sit including this bracket on the right coil mount.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8395.jpg)

Then I held the cable up to the clutch lever length adjuster at the right length that I needed. Need to be careful to check the steering at extremes of it's range that the cable will be long enough and won't bind or kink when turning the handlebars. Marked the cutting point with a piece of tape
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8397.jpg)

Next remove the cable from the bike and pull the cable inner as far out as it will go (out towards the lever end). Measure the free unsheathed cable length. This is important so don't forget it!
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8399.jpg)

Cut the nobbly bit off the end of the cable
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8401.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8404.jpg)

Cut the cable outer. Approx 7-8 inches removed
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8400.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8402.jpg)

I heated up the plastic outer to soften it so I could pull this bit off the end that was going to be discarded to re-use it on new end of the remaining cable
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8405.jpg)

Bit of pushing and shoving required to fit it (gently heating the plastic helps) and then nail punched to make sure it stays put
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8408.jpg)

So next was to re-attach the nobbly bit onto the new end of the shortened cable. I have read that it is possible to heat the nobbly bit in order to melt the solder and pull the old piece of cable out. I decided to just make my own nobbly bit because I happened to have a piece of steel rod just the right diameter lying around
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8406.jpg)

So I cut a piece of rod to the right length and started to drill a hole in it with a very blunt drill bit.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8410.jpg)

Of course the drill bit broke. For anyone following these instructions I would suggest a sharp drill bit
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8411.jpg)

Start again. Flatten off one side of the nobbly bit, drill hole, countersink hole
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8412.jpg)

Slide you newly made nobbly bit over the end of your cable and measure out your unsheathed length
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8413.jpg)

Cut your cable a couple of mm on the other side of the nobbly bit and then splay out the individual fibres of the cable so they are spread out over the countersunk hole
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8414.jpg)

Short blast with the mig
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8415.jpg)

And check that it fits in your lever. If the blob of weld is too big file it too size
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8416.jpg)

And the end result is a beautifully fitting clutch cable nicely hidden under the tank where nobody can see it. Ain't life grand?

Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Aug 27, 2012, 04:46:34
Other bits and pieces that I have been getting on with...

When the tacho cable exits the back of the tacho it immediately runs into the headlight bucket (ditto the speedo cable) with no room to bend enough to run freely. I have the tacho/speedo and headlight bucket mounted where I want them so moving them is not an option. I decided to drill a hole in the back of the headlight bucket and run the cable through the hole into the bucket and exit where all the electrical wiring exits. A left over rubber grommet from some other part of the bike fits nicely in the hole
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8419.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8420.jpg)

Filed a lot of the body filler off the mudguard to smooth it out
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8392.jpg)

Painted with spray filler/undercoat
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8393.jpg)

Started sanding down the hills and filling the valleys
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8394.jpg)

Another coat of primer and I'm calling it done. Just need to mount it somehow.

So here's a question for you knowledgeable types. My front wheel hub is from a Harley NarrowGlide. It uses the Harley speedo drive. Does anyone know how the ratio of the Harley speedo drive compares to the CB350? Assuming I can get a cable that will fit from Harley drive to Honda speedo, how accurate are my speeds going to be?

OK that's all for now thanks for reading!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: BCBarker on Aug 27, 2012, 08:40:06
nice work on the cable shortening! I think I have a few cables to shorten....
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: Dale on Aug 27, 2012, 09:19:56
Hey thanks for sharing and documenting that... :-D
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: RGRH on Aug 28, 2012, 00:14:55

Peeled off the alfoil...one of these days I'm going to work out how to line the plug with something so the fibreglass part will pop out easily without aluminium foil stuck all over it


Can't remember where I heard this, maybe a DCC video of Herm making a seat, but try Sex wax (for surf boards you juviniles!).  Check youtube or the DCC website for the video.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Aug 28, 2012, 00:23:08
Hahahahaha!!!! ;D ;D ;D ;D Sex wax! Of course! Why didn't I think of Sex Wax!! Might even try some KY Jelly too! ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: RGRH on Aug 28, 2012, 00:36:39
Try this video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=klcwT2IMznU&feature=relmfu (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=klcwT2IMznU&feature=relmfu)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Aug 28, 2012, 00:45:57
Thx RG I'll have to check it out when I can get onto a wifi. Didn't mean to soumd like I was dismissing your idea. I'm sure it would work. But it sure does sound funny. Maybe that's the juvenile in me! The reason I use alfoil is that it also protects the underlying plug from getting covered in resin. It's a bugger to peel off though...
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: RGRH on Aug 28, 2012, 00:52:49
No problem bro!  No one is more juvinile than I! ;D
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Aug 28, 2012, 00:57:51
Haha!! Yes I assumed you would have a sense of humour when
 I read your corn signature line!!! ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Aug 31, 2012, 00:12:27
So bits and pieces of progress continues...

My banjo bolts for the brakes arrived from Italia...
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8423.jpg)

Calipers
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8424.jpg)

Ridiculous braking power for such a teeny weeny bike...
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8425.jpg)

The advantage of using the front end all from the same bike as the brakes means little things like the bracket holding the brake line to the lower triple clamp fits perfectly. Things that fit perfectly make me happy
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8427.jpg)

Sourced a rod and some rod ends. They are both "normal" threads i.e. right hand threads because I don't have a left hand tap. That means adjusting the length of the linkage will be very slightly more time consuming but of no significance really.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8421.jpg)

Drilled a couple of holes and tapped a couple of threads...
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8422.jpg)

I needed a bolt with a short unthreaded segment below the head but I didn't have one so I found one with a long unthreaded segment, cut it to size and cut a thread onto it. First attempt, FAIL!!
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8431.jpg)

Second attempt did the job. Next up was to assemble the whole gear linkage thing and it fits like a glove (after a bit of minor adjustment)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8432.jpg)

Not sure if the James Boag's Brewery sticker is going to make the final cut...

Now that the gear linkage is fully assembled and fitted I have struck a major stumbling block that so far I have been unable to stumble over. I can't change gears ??? ??? The linkage does it's job and is not binding anywhere. The gear change shaft rotates properly both forward and back but the gearbox stays in neutral. Won't click down into first or up into second. Time for a lunch break and try and sort it out later.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: hillsy on Aug 31, 2012, 01:49:23
Try spinning the back wheel as you're changing gears.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Sep 06, 2012, 06:32:25
Quote
Try spinning the back wheel as you're changing gears.

Tried that Hillsy with no luck. The gear change issue is still not resolved and in lieu of knowing what to do about it, I have decided to move on to other things in the hope that when I come back to the gear change mechanism it will have fixed itself. In addition to the gear change, I also have a new thing to fix...my home made shortened clutch cable
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8436.jpg)

Didn't even make it to the end of the build let alone out of the garage!! If any one is thinking of following my advice on how to shorten a clutch cable you might want to think twice. Looks like welding the nipple onto the cabe with the MIG weakens the cable enough that it snaps with minimal use. No wonder these things are usually soldered instead of welded!! Oh well, one more little job…

On to more exciting things. Shorty mufflers arrived in the post…
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8502.jpg)

They look great on the bike but there are 2 problems. The first is they don't clear the left side shock
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8507.jpg)

The second is the foul on each other because of the flare out from the header pipe
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8506.jpg)

So I marked out where I needed to place a dent and placed the muffler in the vice with a socket wedged into the right spot
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8512.jpg)

Applied heat and cranked on the vice (gently!!)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8514.jpg)

The end result t make a small divet for the two mufflers to clear each other
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8513.jpg)

Applied more heat and a gentle bashing with a hammer to get the side dent to clear the shock. Repeat for both mufflers
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8515.jpg)

Looks terrible but it now fits and the terrible looking bits are hidden
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8519.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8520.jpg)

The mufflers will be held on with hose clamps so I had to cut a slot where the muffler joins the header so the hose clamp can compress down tightly onto the header pipe. The slot goes all the way to the weld. It's only halfway in the picture. Also one on the other side of the pipe. I might also put some spring retainers to hold the mufflers on as an added security so there not just held on with hose clamps
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8521.jpg)

Other bits that I finally got are the banjo bolts and bleed screws for the callipers
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8503.jpg)

All nicely mounted
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8522.jpg)

Next up was to fabricate some sort of bracket to hold my homemade front guard on. Thin piece of sheet steel
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8437.jpg)

marked out and cut to shape
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8438.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8499.jpg)

Sort of fits. I'll probably pop rivet the mudguard to the bracket
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8500.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8501.jpg)

I'll get some 51mm hose clamps to hold the bracket to the fork leg. All the edges and the holes in the bracket need to be  tidied up to make it presentable. Not sure yet but I may paint the bracket just to make it look a little nicer.

Thanks for reading folks. As usual, progress is at a glacial pace…but slow progress is better than no progress!!

Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: hillsy on Sep 06, 2012, 10:38:13
Oh wow - didn't realise you tried to MIG the clutch cable  :o  Solder is the only way...as you now know  ;D


Mufflers look sweet.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: Korsch_RS on Sep 06, 2012, 12:13:59
I used the same MIG trick on my throttle cable, and that broke too :(

I think DCC has shortened clutch cables that might work for you?

I used MTB parts to make my new custom throttle cables, but I'm not sure if those cables are up to the task of pulling the clutch. Although they are both hand/lever operated so they might be strong enough. Anyway, that's another place to look for custom cable parts. I also have found that bike shops are quite common, so MTB parts are a lot easier to get a hold of than custom motorcycle parts.

Bike's looking great! Can't wait to see the finished product!
Title: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: freedomgli on Sep 06, 2012, 13:41:51
Soldered cable ends are ideal (assuming you do them right) but if you have a TIG welder you can peen the cable end and then zap it with the torch so it makes a balled end. Be sure to slide the fitting away from the cable end before you hit it with the torch. Don't MIG weld cable ends. As you've learned, that technique doesn't work.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: hillsy on Sep 06, 2012, 19:59:09
Can't say I've seen anyone use a TIG to mount up cable ends - I would think it would ultimately have the same result as the MIG because you are melting the cable as opposed to soldering which "glues" the cable to the end / tip
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: pandknz on Sep 06, 2012, 20:13:05
dont mig the cable, the heat is making the strands brittle, use lead and your heat torch, keepthe cable as cool as possible so it does not become brittle.

by the way those brakes are sick! it will stop on a dime thats for sure!!! love it!  8)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Sep 23, 2012, 08:51:30
Well, it's been a looong time since an update!! Was a bit busy training for and running my first marathon which was last weekend. Haven't really felt like spending too much time on my feet since then...

A bit of progress has been made however. First and foremost, I now have a functioning clutch cable!! I managed to solder the nipple onto the cable without incident although I did have to trim down the cable outer a little bit to make sure the cable outer to nipple length was correct. So clutch is all good.

I also now have a functioning gearbox! Since mounting the gear change linkage I have been unable to actually get the gears to change. I decided I needed to remove the right side cover to have a look at the gear selector shaft, arm and drum and try and work out what was going on. I was going to try and avoid having to drain the oil when removing the side cover so I leaned the bike way over to the left and pulled the cover off. Unfortunately, leaning the bike over does not allow the oil to fall away enough from the side cover for it to be removed without making a mess. Awful mess, at least half a litre of oil all over the floor!!! Aaaarggghhh!!! All the Ducatis I've worked on have had a deep sump so it's a simple job to lean it over a little, pull the cover off and hardly a drop gets spilt. The CB350 has a very shallow sump, so big mess... Lesson learned: drain the oil to remove the side cover!

Anyway, I found the problem with the gear change. Back during the engine rebuild, I found that I had mislaid a part which I replaced with a large cap screw
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/CB350/DSC_5687.jpg)

It turns out that when trying to change gears, the head of the cap screw was impeding the full travel of the gear selector arm.
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8526_zpsfadc1d33.jpg)

A very easy fix. I just loosened the lock nut, wound out the bolt and retightened the locknut. Simple!! I am now praising God, Allah, Buddha and Mohammed that I don't have to open the cases again to delve into the interior of the gearbox...

Next up was to fix the oil leak that I had coming out from behind the electronic ignition cover on the left end of the camshaft. I had left the oil seal off the camshaft and assumed that replacing that seal would fix the leak. So I replaced the seal, started the engine and still had a huge leak from the same place!!! So pulled the cover off again, and eventually worked out what the problem was. Under the the housing that the ignition rotor is mounted in and that supports the end of the camshaft there is an oil passageway
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8532_zps10e244b9.jpg)

The gasket that fits between this housing and the head can go in one of two ways. If it is put in the wrong way it doesn't completely seal the oil gallery and allows oil to spew everywhere
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8533_zps113e5c3a.jpg)

Gasket inserted the RIGHT way!
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8534_zps8026eadb.jpg)

The next problem I had was to fix the kill switch. My kill switch was functioning a little too well. When activated it killed the engine by blowing the fuse!! I pulled apart my wiring and realised that there were two problems neither of which became apparent until the kill switch was activated. As long as the kill switch stayed in the Run position, there was no problem. When the kill switch was activated, the fuse blew.

 The first problem was my fault in that the wires I had running to the kill switch wires were not hooked up correctly. So that was easily fixed. Next problem was that the cheap Made in China generic kill switch I bought from eBay was wired such that when the switch is in the RUN position, there is no current flow through the switch. When the switch is switched to STOP, there is current flow throughout the switch. This seems like an odd arrangement to me and I don't know what vehicle the switch was made for. The way my wiring works is for power to flow through the switch to the coils when in the Run position. Switching the switch to Stop, cuts the power to the coils. SO I pulled the kill switch apart and after an hour of fiddling around managed to change the switch to function so power will run through it when in the Run position and stop when in the Stop position. For the life of me I can't work out how the switch would work if it was the other way around?!? Anyway, it works now...it only cost me $8 so I can hardly complain.

The bike is now "finished" (still needs paint though). But being "finished" means theoretically, I can take it for a ride. Which, theoretically, I may do tomorrow!!! Woohoo! ;D ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: zacc on Oct 01, 2012, 08:34:02
When you noticed the problem was it not going into gear at all or was it sometimes going into gear sometimes? Love your blog!

Thanks again
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: DrJ on Oct 10, 2012, 16:07:47
If you're going to shorten cables, don't do it at the hand lever end. There's much more stress up there than the opposite end. I've shortened a brake cable at the drum end and it's held up for several years.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Oct 13, 2012, 06:53:11
Good point Dr J. The nipple at the lever end of the cable gets pulled in an arc which adds an extra dimension of stress rather than the straight line pull at the distal end of the cable . I'll have to remember that for next time :)

Zacc, the gear lever travel was being impeded by the head of the bolt that I had inserted (see picture). So the gears were not selected at all. Easily solved by screwing the bolt out a little so the head of the bolt was not getting in the way.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Oct 13, 2012, 07:50:13
Picked up the tank and seat from the painter today and they look great!!! :) :) :)

Couldn't resist putting it all together to see what it looks like. Pictures as follows

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8566.jpg)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8565.jpg)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8569.jpg)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8570.jpg)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8573.jpg)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8574.jpg)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8581.jpg)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8582.jpg)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8578.jpg)
Title: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: neevo on Oct 13, 2012, 08:09:45
Holy shitballs!!!! Nice paint!!!!

Who did you send them too? Sydney I assume? Care to share a rough cost as it would help me budget paint for mine.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: WNTITAL on Oct 13, 2012, 08:16:31
Nice bike! Love the color combo.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: peteGS on Oct 13, 2012, 17:10:52
Mate just when I was thinking I was so over this cafe thing... awesome! :D


Love the result, so much attention to detail there...
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: MickyC on Oct 13, 2012, 19:43:00
THIS BIKE IS BEAUTIFUL!

a very well done to you mate she turned out awesome. be ultra proud.

Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Oct 14, 2012, 06:14:26
Hey thanks guys for the comments. I'm pretty pleased with the way it has turned out. After agonising for months over what colours and what layout to go with I was still very uncertain about whether I'd made the right decision. Once I saw the end result I was very pleased with it. Quite subtle and understated. The black and grey both have metal flake which don't show up very very well in the photos but really sparkle in the sun.

Neevo, paint was by Collide-a-Scope in Hornsby. Not the first time I've used them for paint but first time for a complicated custom job. They do outstanding work, took the time to go over every detail of what I wanted colours, layout, stickers, etc The black is paint, the grey and silver are vinyl stickers with clear coat over the top. For tank, seat and front guard it came to $943. Not cheap but definitely good quality.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: andycafe on Oct 14, 2012, 07:28:49
Holy shitballs!!!! Nice paint!!!!


+1   :P
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: pandknz on Oct 14, 2012, 08:21:12
WOW!! looking good, really like the colour!
Title: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: neevo on Oct 14, 2012, 18:32:40
$943. Not cheap but definitely good quality.

Wow, that's a bit more than I thought. Better start saving.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: sinbad85 on Oct 27, 2012, 19:21:42
fantastic efforts sir!
really hope to see this in the flesh one day.

going to ride the hell out of it now?
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Oct 28, 2012, 03:53:27
Quote
fantastic efforts sir!
really hope to see this in the flesh one day.

going to ride the hell out of it now?

Where are you located Sinbad? Could meet for a coffee at Deus if you're in Sydney!

Will be a while before I can ride this bike properly though! I need to get it registered which may be a whole can of worms in itself. In the meantime I need to sort out the jetting with the CV carbs. I've got it running on both cylinders now (no mean feat) and it runs smoothly and idles well. But I haven't been able to really rev it out past about 5000rpm yet mainly because living in the inner city limits where I can safely open it up and work and travel have conspired to limit my riding time!!

Soooo...one of these days...
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: DrJ on Oct 28, 2012, 03:58:16
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8565.jpg)

That's a very tidy build indeed. I assume you relocated the sidestand mount forward to clear the shift lever. I also need to do that. How does it work? Does it balance well?
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Oct 28, 2012, 04:13:51
Thx DrJ.

Quote
I assume you relocated the sidestand mount forward to clear the shift lever.

Yes I moved it forward to clear the shift lever but as it turns out I didn't really need to. The original side stand for the CB350 is mounted onto the the footrest crossmember mechanism. So when you go to rear sets you need to mount the side stand bracket somewhere. I chose to move it forward because just eyeballing the location I thought it was going to foul the shift lever (this was before I'd even bought the rear sets). In fact it would have been fine further back.

Quote
How does it work? Does it balance well?

There are two problems as it sits right now. First is the stand is slightly too long. This means the bike stands too upright. Although on flat ground it leans enough (just) to be stable, it would not take much to accidentally bump it off the stand. So the stand needs to be slightly shorter or the rear shocks slightly longer. I need to measure my geometry properly and compare to stock before I commit to longer shocks (the standard rear shocks are *ahem* a bit primitive). The second problem is when sitting on the bike, the stand is a bit hard to reach with the toe of your left foot.

If I was doing this build again, I would mount the stand further back and I would make sure I had rear sets and gear lever in place to check clearances instead of just guessing that there would be a problem
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: pandknz on Oct 28, 2012, 06:48:40
I have moved mine (CB360) forward about half way between where you have it and std, I did have the rear sets to measure off though, love your build I hope to see it someday

Cheers
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: axeugene27 on Oct 30, 2012, 17:56:30
does it do a front flip when you tap that front brake. Jk it turned out super awesome-sauce.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: KaaoSkitzofreniK on Nov 01, 2012, 22:44:27
This is a great looking bike, i just joined this forum today and this was the first thread i sat and read all the way through. It's a beautiful example of what can be done out of one's garage! I haven't touched my cl450 in months for lack of tools and patience.... Ireally hope being on here and seeing bikes like yours can get me back into working on what i want.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: pandknz on Nov 01, 2012, 23:35:21
Hey Ducatiboy, have you had a chance to RWC and REGO it?

any issues?
Title: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: neevo on Nov 01, 2012, 23:38:01
The SCR lot on Facebook have a few contacts if required. Keen to see what's required to get her through though.

I assume I've got a few hoops to jump through with my contraption.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Nov 03, 2012, 19:56:08
Haven't started the RWC/rego process yet. I've been tossing up whether to go with a club registration (much cheaper but limited use) or with full rego (expensive and potentially difficult but unlimited). Bit of research required...
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: pandknz on Nov 03, 2012, 20:28:22
Let us know how you go, I am about 12 month off but will be keen to know whats required, Qld rules are bound to change by then though.......... ???
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: MickyC on Nov 03, 2012, 20:40:28
this may help guys

http://www.infrastructure.gov.au/roads/vehicle_regulation/bulletin/pdf/NCOP8_Section_LL_Motor-Cycles_and_3WheelVehicles_01Jan2011_v2.pdf
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: teddpage on Nov 03, 2012, 21:13:30
Holy shit...i just stumbled across this build.  AMAZING WORK!  I just flipped through all 20+ pages.  Great stuff!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Nov 03, 2012, 21:40:36
Thx Ted it's been a bit of a love/hate thing. I love tinkering in the shed and I've mostly loved working on this project. At times tho I have wanted to push it over a cliff...

Thanks for that link deepwater. Looks like it'll be very useful. I'll examine it a little more closely tonight.

I'll let you know how I get on Pand. With any luck I'll have Rego by Xmas. I'm in NSW tho so rules here may not apply up in Qld
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Dec 12, 2012, 20:14:50
What's this? An update with no pictures??!? That is unnacceptable. Unfortunately that's all there is. Piccies later. This post will be very boring and probably of no use to anyone outside NSW and certainly of no use to those outside Australia.

So I've started the process of registration. An important thing to know upfront is that the RTA (Roads and Traffic Authority) does not exist anymore. It is now the RMS (Road and Maritime Services). Why the change and what it means is anybodies guess but from a practical point if view it means some of the websites have RMS in the URL and some have RTA. This is a little confusing until the RMS finishes rolling out their new services.

To get a bike registered in NSW with no Rego papers requires a blue slip. This is primarily just a rubber stamp type vehicle identity check to note the engine and frame numbers and make sure nothing is stolen. They also confirm all the lights work, the horn works etc. If the bike has never been registered before OR has had substantial modifications since previously being registered then you need to get the modifications certified before getting the blue slip. This is what used to be called the engineer's certificate. The certification process for this has also changed. It is now done under the supervision of VSSCS another new government office. It stands for Vehicle Safety Standards Certification Scheme and there are a list of certified inspectors on the RMS website. Each inspector has their own areas of expertise so you need to be sure the one you deal with can do motorcycles. They will inspect your bike, make sure  it (hopefully) complies with whatever legal requirements were in place at the date of manufacture of the bike and will notify the RMS that your bike is able to be registered. They will also give you a hard copy of the Certificate of Compliance which you need to keep and pass on to any future owner of the bike.

Once you have your certification, you then go get your blue slip from any one of many auto shops. Then you get your CTP insurance, visit the local registery office, pay them a squillion dollars and bingo! Your bike's registered!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: RustyOlive on Dec 12, 2012, 20:21:42
Good lord!! Thats one hell of a sharp looking 350!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: pandknz on Dec 13, 2012, 02:45:45
Thanks for the process update on the Rego, I wonder if its the same in Qld, not likley but surely no worse, we will see next year when I get to that stage........

so how was the first legal ride with a plate?
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350 FINISHED!!!
Post by: ducatiboy on Dec 13, 2012, 03:21:20
Thanks Rusty. I'm very pleased with the way it's turned out! :) :) :)

So after going over the background information required for registration in NSW in my previous post, here are the specifics of where I'm up to with the process.

I took the bike to Peter Gillard in Leichhardt for road-worthy inspection to get the Certificate of Compliance a few weeks ago. Expecting the worst in terms of draconian, finicky nit-picking I found him to be very pleasant to deal with, thoroughly professional and very sympathetic to the time and effort that goes into bringing these old buckets back to life. He went over the bike from front to back and after a brief fright with the noise meter (100.4dB instead of <100dB at rpm of half maximum power for pre '74 motorcycle) he decided near enough was good enough and that there were only 4 things that I had to do in order to earn myself a Certificate of Compliance, the motorcycle builder's equivalent of a nugget of gold. To get my hands on one of these mythical, much spoken of but rarely seen pieces of treasure I needed to:

1. weigh the bike

2. change the bar end mirror to be flat instead of concave

3. somehow get a functioning speedo

4. mount a vertical piece of reflective material visible from the rear of the bike

Not having ready access to a weigh bridge, I ended up weighing the bike with the front and rear wheel in turn resting on the bathroom scales and adding the two together. This gave 150kg with half a tank of fuel which was a bit heavier than I was hoping for but whatever, who cares? Then bought myself a cheap piece of crap bar end mirror with flat glass and stuck a reflector on the back just above the number plate mount position.

Having jumped through those hoops, I then had to somehow find a cable that would work with a honda speedo at one end and a Harley speedo drive at the other. Took the speedo and the drive to Automotive Instruments in Lidcombe and they custom made a cable to the length I specified. One week and $86 later, it was mounted on the bike. Still doesn't actually work because of some issues with the internal cable being slightly short :P Fortunately my very helpful and understanding inspector did not insist on seeing the speedo actually working but accepted that the cable mounted in the correct position was enough for compliance. I still have no idea if the Harley drive will turn at the correct speed for the honda gauge not to mention the different diameter front wheel that is now in the bike and what influence that may have. But whatevs...who cares?

So all the requirements have now been addressed and I have the coveted Certificate of Compliance carefully placed in a bulletproof hermetically sealed container locked in a safe. A quick trip to get the rubber stamp blue slip from the local garage, a few phone calls to track down the cheapest CTP insurance and then down to the registry office for final registration. Almost had a disaster when they asked me for a receipt of purchase or other proof of ownership. They didn't care when I told them that I had nobly rescued this poor motorcycle after a decade of languishing lost and alone in a farmers paddock, they just wanted the damn receipt. Which I didn't have. I quickly wrote a Statutory Declaration to the effect that I had been gifted the bike by the farmer who wanted to get rid of it and handed it to a JP to sign which he did without reading it or even asking me any questions about it. I could have asked him to sign over all his worldly possessions including his wife and daughters and he probably would have. I paid them my squillion for registration fees and then, finally, the moment I'd been waiting for...the RTA office clerk slowly walked towards me and reverentially placed on the table in front of me the Holy Grail. A NSW motorcycle registration plate. I tried to speak but found myself unable to...I was too choked up. With my eyes misting, I somehow managed to mumble thanks and I grabbed the plate and ran out of the office before the bastards could change their minds.

So that's the end! All done! Next project...Ducati 750F1

But the reality is it's never really all done, is it? I still have to get the bugger to run properly. Fiddle with the jets to get it to rev to red line. Maybe upgrade the rear shocks. Maybe fork out for Mikunis. Maybe fix the right foot peg which impedes the travel of the kick start lever rendering it useless etc etc. Or maybe just ride the damn thing.

Sooooo....here it is!

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/P1110330.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/P1110353.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/P1110344.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/P1110339.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8665.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8663.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8658.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8655.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8651.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8634.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8633.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8636.jpg)

Thank you to all who have commented and got involved along the way. It's been quite a trip and I've learned a lot, mostly about what a great resource DTT is for newbies and experienced builders alike. This is a great place to learn the ins and outs of bike building and is a constant source of inspiration! :) :) :) :) :) :) :)

Comments and criticisms welcome!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: MickyC on Dec 13, 2012, 05:11:17
Beautiful is the only thing that comes to mind well done looks amazing
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: peteGS on Dec 13, 2012, 08:45:49
Mate that's just awesome work! And I'm referring to getting it registered by that comment... I've already told you how awesome the bike is :D


I specifically avoided all structural modifications on my GS450 and did everything by their modification handbook specifically to avoid going through such a run around with Qld Transport.


From everything I've heard and seen up here so far, the process is at least as complicated as NSW's and maybe even more so...


Having said that, the mobile roadworthy guy was very easy going and it seemed that as long as you'd put the effort in to make it safe, he was happy. He didn't even test ride it so that I could pop its cherry myself.


Anyway, very very glad you got her registered and she's definitely looking great! A very sweet ride...
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: veaone on Dec 13, 2012, 17:01:33
This could be one of the coolest looking cafe's on this site. The lines all flow together so nicely.
Title: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: neevo on Dec 13, 2012, 17:16:52
Has this had a BOM nomination yet? If not watch out whoever is participating in Jan!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: Dutch Von Shed on Dec 14, 2012, 07:42:52
DucatiBoy's gorgeous build and back-story is now on the Bike Shed. (http://www.thebikeshed.cc)

(http://thebikeshed.cc/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/DBoy-CB350-LS1-D-700.jpg) (http://thebikeshed.cc/2012/12/14/dbs-cb-350/)

Plus loads of other DTT builds and pro builds. We hope you all like.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Dec 15, 2012, 05:54:36
Thanks everyone for the kind words :) :)

Neevo, it hasn't been nominated for BOTM and I'd be very flattered if it was. But in a sense I don't believe it should be or if it was, then it certainly shouldn't win. There is not much on this bike that I actually made myself. It is pretty much a bike bolted together from after market parts that anyone could buy. The parts of the build that required any skill (getting the front axle to fit the hub, getting the discs to fit the hub, getting the stem to fit the triple clamps, making the tank and seat, the paint etc) were all done by others. I literally just bolted it all together. Don't get me wrong, I think it looks great! I love it but I think BOTM candidates should be genuine builds not pseudo builds!

Anyway, as I was saying before these types of projects are never really finished so here's an update for work done today. I had forgotten to connect the breather on the top of the cam/rocker box to anything. It was just sitting there as follows:

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8743_zps14ddda65.jpg)

Given that the air box has been removed this breather now has nothing to connect to so I had to think of some sort of collector bottle to collect the potential oil mist that could spray out every time I ride the bike. I didn't want just any old bottle, I wanted to have something unique, something that related to me personally and something a little wacky. This is what I came up with for the collector bottle… an empty bottle of volatile anaesthetic agent.

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8737_zpsc0c279a2.jpg)

The hose to the collector is a large venous cannula. It collects venous blood from either the superior vena cava or inferior vena cava and carries it into a cardiopulmonary bypass circuit during heart surgery.

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8740_zpsdbe8f563.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8741_zps2170dcfa.jpg)

All fits together nicely with the bottle mounted on top of the tool box!

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8742_zpsb076e079.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8745_zps518a6db5.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8746_zps249653f9.jpg)
(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8747_zps12b80a2e.jpg)
Title: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: neevo on Dec 15, 2012, 06:04:11
Neevo, it hasn't been nominated for BOTM and I'd be very flattered if it was. But in a sense I don't believe it should be or if it was, then it certainly shouldn't win. There is not much on this bike that I actually made myself. It is pretty much a bike bolted together from after market parts that anyone could buy. The parts of the build that required any skill (getting the front axle to fit the hub, getting the discs to fit the hub, getting the stem to fit the triple clamps, making the tank and seat, the paint etc) were all done by others. I literally just bolted it all together. Don't get me wrong, I think it looks great! I love it but I think BOTM candidates should be genuine builds not pseudo builds!

I think your doing yourself a disservice! Don't get me wrong if you went up against a full custom job you might be in trouble but it would have to be an incredible biuld and ultimately its all about the end result and yours is a top notch!

It's like giving a conductor shit because he's not playing the violins ;)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: wab on Dec 15, 2012, 10:33:35
Well said, the original concept, the anxiety, the drive and energy to complete it...all yours.:D

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2

Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: m511y on Dec 20, 2012, 18:31:54
Subscribed
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Dec 22, 2012, 07:32:07
thx guys :D

A few more pics and then I'm calling it done

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8754_zps8a58b515.jpg)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8758_zps01b5b026.jpg)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8763_zpsb6ba0bca.jpg)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8767_zpsad4f3bba.jpg)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8775_zps72e61e18.jpg)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8777_zpsa475de77.jpg)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8783_zps7b8db568.jpg)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8785_zps4dc7757a.jpg)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8786_zps6179ca65.jpg)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8735_zps26b4555e.jpg)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8733_zps1a391ee5.jpg)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8731_zpsb933257e.jpg)

(http://i1214.photobucket.com/albums/cc485/ducatiboy1/DSC_8781_zps59d276ac.jpg)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: andycafe on Dec 22, 2012, 08:08:31
Great shoot   :) great build  :) sweet bike  8)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: teddpage on Dec 22, 2012, 10:50:28
Great set of pics man!  The bike looks amazing!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: yorkie350 on Dec 22, 2012, 11:06:20
AWESOME its as simple as that love it fella true inspiration to all of us hope mine will look a 10th of your cool example of hard work /dedication / vision thanks for sharing it with us and heres looking forward to ya next project have a great xmas n new year ride safe mate cheers from cold wet UK
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: f22hb on Dec 22, 2012, 15:45:12
Insane bike. I could see the work you put into it without even going through the tread just looking at the final project. Now I'm excited to go through the thread lol 8)
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: YogiBear on Dec 23, 2012, 20:53:19
I wish I would have caught this build from the beginning. Great looking 350, ducatiboy. Congrats on the botm nomination
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: stroker crazy on Dec 23, 2012, 22:11:21
Beautiful bike ducatiboy!

If I had known you were in Glebe we might have had a beer and bullshit session.

Crazy
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: tom050162 on Dec 24, 2012, 13:31:51
Definitely a bike of the month! I have no problem in nominating you !
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: pandknz on Dec 25, 2012, 07:32:42
I'll second that!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Dec 25, 2012, 17:02:08
Thanks everyone for the BOTM nominations and seconds! Quite an honour. Also I hope everyone has had a great xmas with family and friends, hopefully accompanied by eating and drinking enough but not too much. :) :)

Stroker are you in the inner west? ALways open for beer and bullshit sessions!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: stroker crazy on Dec 25, 2012, 22:05:54
ducatiboy - Glebe Point Road inner-west enough?

Be good to meet up sometime, PM following with contact info.

Crazy
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: trek97 on Dec 26, 2012, 11:08:23
Wow your LE CB350 is out of this world.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: theconjuring on Jan 01, 2013, 19:06:10
great build. she is stunning
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: GoonerYoda on Jan 07, 2013, 15:03:36
Sweet build!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: mattfeet on Jan 08, 2013, 00:21:31
Holy crap this build is AMAZING! Wow.

-Matt
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: sidk1987 on Jan 08, 2013, 01:27:46
Man, what a build. So much inspiration from this bike.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: smvirili on Jan 11, 2013, 23:01:18
congratulations on the completion of a beautiful build.
utterly stunning, this is.  :o :o :o
bike of the month
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: snmavridis on Jan 17, 2013, 00:47:12
I just want to thank you for taking all the time out of your days to post your progress. there is SO much information to be had in this thread that i bought a notebook just to write down anything interesting i came across for future reference. beautiful bike and very clever fixes to some very hassling problems.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Jan 26, 2013, 00:03:18
Once again thanks for all the kudos re the finished bike and thanks to all who have commented here. Much appreciated and very flattered to win BOTM!

A quick little update. No pics I'm afraid. After Christmas I went for a great ride to one of the local Sydney beaches for breakfast and coffee. During this ride a huge oil leak developed which I had a little trouble tracing the source of however it seemed to be coming from up around the head somewhere maybe between the head and the cam box. Anyway, I thought I'll just get home and sort it out then. On the way home, two things happened. First is that while accelerating hard up a steep hill the crankcase breather tube blew out of the breather bottle that I had made for it to vent into. Second, I ran out of petrol!! Luckily I was only 400m from home so I managed to get home without too much trouble.

Family holidays meant I didn't get a chance to look into the problems until last week. First I cleaned all the oil off the outside of the engine and started the bike up again and revved it pretty hard but couldn't find any source of a leak. So I was at a bit of a loss to explain why it had leaked so much on my ride. Then I remembered the breather tube that had blown out of the collector bottle. I figured that the tube would only blow out if it was under a lot of pressure and it would only be under pressure if the bottle itself was not venting to atmosphere. If the bottle was not venting to atmospheric pressure then the increased pressure in the crankcase may be causing the oil leak. So I disconnected the vent tube from the engine and blew into it by mouth with the distal end still inserted into the breather bottle. I couldn't blow into the bottle because there was an airtight seal where the tube went into the bottle. This meant that the crankcase, vent tube and breather bottle were all one enclosed, confined space with no venting to atmosphere. When I had installed the breather bottle, I had drilled the top of the bottle out to accept the breather tube. By pure chance I drilled the hole just large enough to accept the breather tube but not large enough to allow any leak around it. This meant that when accelerating hard the crankcase pressure was building up high enough to force oil out, probably around gaskets.

It was an easy fix...just drilled a few holes in the plastic collector bottle and filled the bottle with some sponge to soak up the oil mist. Problem solved! No engine pull down required. Who would have thought such an innocent thing could cause such a big problem?? Lesson learned...the crankcase breather does actually need to be vented to atmosphere!!!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: stroker crazy on Jan 26, 2013, 01:39:49
Small things can cause disproportional panic!

However, it presented an opportunity for the first use of distal on DTT.

Crazy
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: Captmilk76 on Feb 05, 2013, 17:11:00
I love this bike, great lines and paint, Awesome job!!!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: DRTP on Feb 05, 2013, 18:28:04
WOW! final thing look amazing! I really like the scrambler look with those shorty mufflers. Did those mufflers have a specific name or could you give me an idea where you found them?

Thanks and again, Great job!
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Feb 11, 2013, 11:46:53
Hi DRTP

Thanks for the compliments! The mufflers are reverse cone shortys from Dime City. Find them here


http://www.dimecitycycles.com/vintage-cafe-racer-caferacer-bobber-brat-chopper-custom-motorcycle-exhaust-parts-stainless-steel-reverse-cone-shorty-motorcycle-muffler-80-1750.html
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: stroker crazy on Feb 15, 2013, 22:44:26
Well ducatiboy, the banner has changed.  It was good to see your bike up there, a well deserved win.

Maybe it won't be the last bike from Glebe to feature.

Crazy
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Feb 17, 2013, 23:40:25
Hey Stroker!

We still need to go drink beer... This weekend??
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: stroker crazy on Feb 18, 2013, 03:19:13
Just got the message ducatiboy - if you mean the weekend of 23-24 I'm up for it!

Send me a PM if you like, for the time and venue.

Crazy
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: hybridfiat on Feb 18, 2013, 18:34:42
Hi, Ive just finished reading your amazing post. It is a path to perfection that I can tread; secure in the knowledge that one greater than I has gone before, OK brown nosing over  :-X on to business.
Im starting a Guzzi Nevada to Cafe Racer project and need some advice.
The wheels on the Nevada go round and round are 16" at the back and 18"!? at the front. Not a good look for a Racer. Id like to thread a new rim at the front or back in an appropriate size to balance things up.
Who do you know could supply me with a rim? Im in Western Australia.
Cheers
Steve
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Feb 18, 2013, 23:34:39
Hi Hybrid

Thanks for your message. Before doing alterations to the geometry of your bike, have a clear idea of what those alterations are going to do to the way it handles. I do not have any specific knowledge of your model bike but as a general rule, it's not a good idea to change rim size just for the sake of looks.

Things to consider when increasing front rim diameter are that it will raise the front of the bike, increase steering head angle, alter trail, slow the steering, increase centripetal force of the spinning wheel altering it's responsiveness to steering input, may make it difficult to fit the front mudguard and may make the side stand too short to be functional. Nothing is impossible but remember that invariably changing one thing leads to necessary changes in several others, sometimes predictably, sometimes not! Easy way is to find someone who's already done it!!

I got my rims from Ash's Spoked Wheels in Brisbane. They weren't cheap but I can vouch for their quality. Talk to them, tell them what you want to do and they should be able to help.

Good luck
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: hybridfiat on Feb 19, 2013, 02:09:05
Thanks Ducatiboy, Ive spoken to Ash on the phone and he advises changing the rear to 18" if I want to use Dunlop TT100 tyres. They only come in 18" and 19".
The front is TOO big. Thats the issue it's 18".
If the rear change is not practical; (It may not work as the suspension travel may not be enough and or the wheel may interfere with the fork of rear wheel frame) I can either go to a 17" rear or make the front wheel a 16" or 17" and forget the Dunlops.
 A 16” wheel at the front lowers the whole bike to suit my short legs. So “Als Gut ende gut”.
This old model Nevada has 16" rear and 18" front. The later models used a 17" at the rear. The frame is common to all the Nevada, V7, Breva 750 and Cafe Racer Specials. They all have the same frame and geometry is changed using fork length and wheel size.
The accoutremant also help to guide the eye and create the impression of curves in the frame that are not really there.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Feb 19, 2013, 15:29:24
Sorry I'd misread your post! I was thinking you had 16" front wheel and were going to go to 18". Changing rear wheel size has a potential for real problems!!! As you have mentioned having sufficient clearance between the top of the tyre and the underside of the rear seat and clearance between the front of the tyre and the swing arm. If the later models had 17" with same frame and swing arm then I guess fitting 17" is not going to be a problem Final drive gearing will also be altered with a bigger rear wheel. I presume the Guzzi is shaft drive? Shouldn't affect fitting the 18" rim but may be a pain to alter final drive gearing.

Having odd size wheels always makes the tyre selection difficult but not usually impossible
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: Nate Cafe on Feb 27, 2013, 13:38:24
Love this build.  Where did you get your shorty mufflers and how do they sound?
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: ducatiboy on Feb 27, 2013, 16:01:15
Hi Nate

On the page before this:

Quote
The mufflers are reverse cone shortys from Dime City. Find them here


http://www.dimecitycycles.com/vintage-cafe-racer-caferacer-bobber-brat-chopper-custom-motorcycle-exhaust-parts-stainless-steel-reverse-cone-shorty-motorcycle-muffler-80-1750.html

They are loud...
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: Nate Cafe on Feb 27, 2013, 16:11:42
Thanks for the quick response.   I have been looking at those exact mufflers for my 77 bmw 75/7. 
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: johnspeck on Apr 15, 2013, 13:41:50
what are the clevis extensions you are using?
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: Texasstar on Aug 01, 2013, 22:56:08
Ducatiboy your shortie design on the scrambler pipes is super cool. My dad and I are thinking of doing that on our 175 pipes.
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: Bru-tom on Jan 18, 2014, 16:24:24
Hey man, the bike turned out great!!!!! wow! congrats, to think what she looked like to now, epic! 8)

glad the oil problem was an easy enough fix. I had the same problem with mine. Maiden voyage, stop for gas, oil everywhere on the head and jugs, the same places it came out before i split the motor to fix. was so upset, especially all the work i had done to get her sorted. I was dreading to have to reopen the motor :( turns out, after i calmed down, that the tachometer drive in the tappet cover, the "delete plate" i had made, id never torqued it down, so oil pressure built up and pissed oil out from the hole. The oil spread all over the motor giving me the illusion that it was coming from the normal places the CB's leak from. I was so relieved! phew! hahahaha, the small things in those situation get overlooked more than we think ;D

aaanyway, hows the bike running now? any updates?
Title: Re: Hi From Australia CB350
Post by: danielsb on Feb 24, 2014, 22:41:08
What a great clean build! I've had your bike as my computer wallpaper for a couple months now to keep me motivated on my cl350 project bike...

It looks like you're running the stock cv carbs with air pod filters; I'm planning to do the same thing. Were you able to tune it in through the entire RPM range? Did you keep the carb jets stock? Also, are you having good luck with your air pod filters, if so, what kind did you end up buying?

Thanks in advance for your help; and again, great bike.