DO THE TON

Blood Sweat Tears and Grease => Projects => Cafe Racers => Topic started by: Fox on Jan 08, 2012, 00:53:04

Title: Living Room Build - Notes on taps/dies
Post by: Fox on Jan 08, 2012, 00:53:04
I got a 1975 Honda CL360 on Thursday of this week. My older brother has been converting a CB650C into a cafe and he inherently got me interested in bikes. Before I knew it I'm forking over $900 for a non-running, rusted, honda CL! My brother says I paid too much for the bike I got and I tend to agree, but I wasn't going to walk away from the bike. I loved it from when I first saw it.

I don't have any motorcycle experience outside of some small work I did on dirt bikes I've had, but I've been working on cars for a few years now, so I know how to handle myself in a garage. I'm wanting to do a frame up restoration of the bike. Tear every piece down and start from the ground up. This includes an entire engine rebuild. I'm doing this in part because I want to learn my bike, but also because I want to learn about bikes in general. I's hoping that with the shop manual on the way and DTT as a resource, it won't prove to terrible a job.

I'm still on the fence about whether I should convert this bike to a cafe racer. Everything on it right now is original, so I could do more of a restoration project on it rather than a conversion. A original CL360 could be worth a good bit more than a Cafe'd CL. There weren't too many made, so you can't find original ones very often. Thoughts, opinions?

Secondly, where to start? I've got a pretty good idea of what all needs to be done, but I'm wondering where the common start point is. My thoughts were to be to get the bike running ok before I rip it down to the guts. Can anyone weigh in on this? Where did you start when you tore stuff down?

UPDATE-1/17/12
To Do List
1. Install new Carbs
2. Build engine back up
3. Fix squishy brakes
6. Derust Wheels
8. Rewire all electrics
   -Fix electric starter
10. Get seat and tank painted!!!


Finished projects
Clean rust out of tank
Replace oil and clean filters
Clean petcock
Diagnose and Fix bad clutch lever
Derust and paint/powdercoat frame
Buy Parts
-Make or Buy a new seat
-Pods
-Blinkers
-Mikuni Carbs
-Reatsets
-Bar end Mirrors
-Clip ons
-New battery
-New headlight bracket
-Fuel line
-New grips
-New Gaskets
-Plenty of random little things

Of course, here are some current (Before) pics.

(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1190.jpg)

(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1193.jpg)

(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1161.jpg)

(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1168.jpg)
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: Tim on Jan 08, 2012, 01:00:11
First, welcome to DTT and I'm confident you'll find tons of help here, no question.

It would be worth checking the electrical out, before taking it apart.  If you're rebuilding the engine, no need to get it running first, but check compression before taking the engine out - easier to kick it over while in the frame.

Get a real Honda Service Manual somewhere online along with a parts diagram if you can.  There are lots of parts fiche drawings online - very helpful in putting it back together.

Then just start stripping it down, in major chunks to get to the frame.  Tank, sidecovers, seat, engine, wheels, front end, swingarm...

I'd clean it up and put it back together and get it running.  If you have the ability to paint the frame etc. yourself go for it.  Replace the swingarm bushings with bronze if you can.  For your first bike/project, I'd keep most of it stock in terms of electrical etc. i.e. don't try to hide the battery, and maybe swap out the seat with a single bump seat and throw some clubmans on.  Nothing too radical and everything reversible for resale if need be.

Glad you bought the bike you fell in love with - makes it all worthwhile.
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: Fox on Jan 08, 2012, 03:07:52
Tim,

Thanks for the welcome! It's very good to be here!

Ok. Anything in particular that I should be looking for? We took a look at electrics when I was buying the bike and the headlight, blinkers, etc did not work, nor did the electric start. The one light we could make come on was the neutral light in the Speedo/tach.

Will a Clymer manual do, or does it have to be the legit Honda shop manual? http://www.ebay.com/itm/1974-77-Honda-CB360-CL360-Scrambler-CL-CB-360-CB250-Shop-Service-Manual-/250968789479?pt=Motors_Manuals_Literature&vxp=mtr&hash=item3a6ee7d1e7#ht_3237wt_1099 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/1974-77-Honda-CB360-CL360-Scrambler-CL-CB-360-CB250-Shop-Service-Manual-/250968789479?pt=Motors_Manuals_Literature&vxp=mtr&hash=item3a6ee7d1e7#ht_3237wt_1099)

Sounds like a pretty good idea. I like what you said about keeping it relatively simple. I have decided that this will be a conversion rather than a restoration. I love Cafe's too much to not try and make one my self. Could I do clip-ons or are they not reversible? I will be powder-coating both the frame as well as some of the more major engine components. I'm not quite sure which ones yet, but I know some of them!

I leave to go back to school tomorrow, and I won't have my bike at school till Wednesday of this, or next week. Might be a bit till I post up, but chances are, I'll be on here asking questions/reading up.
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: Fox on Jan 13, 2012, 22:49:27
Just threw in Prep A of the tank liner. I took a peek just now and I could already see big chunks of rust floating around. So far so good!

Did run into a few problems though.
1. The O-ring around my gas tank is cracked and needs to be replaced. Anyone got a website they can direct me too for this? Also, Would a CB350-360 O-ring fit?

2. The petcock. I'd really like to let it sit in some carb cleaner, but there is one last plastic liner that I can't get out. I've tried to pry it out and only chipped it off. Anyone ever cleaned a CL360 petcock that can provide some help?! I'll grab a picture in just a minute.
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: Fox on Jan 14, 2012, 14:51:42
The tank is looking good. Just put in the final liner. Should be dried and ready for gas/installation tomorrow afternoon. Then we find out if the thing runs! It was a pretty easy process. Kreme has a good manual for you. Just make sure you have a good sized bucket. At least 3 gallon capacity. I'll take some pictures when the final liner has dried. Will probably be changing the oil a little later, so keep an eye out for that.

Here's a before and after shot.
Before
(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1196.jpg)
First Treatment
(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1241.jpg)

Final tank linerl
(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/photo.jpg)

Unfortunate about the beading, but I didn't even realize it until it was too hard to fix. Doesn't seem to be that big of a deal. More of a looks thing IMO.
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: PjkF on Jan 15, 2012, 02:51:20
The tank looks great! I may have to do this to mine!
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: djelliott on Jan 17, 2012, 12:42:06
That tank cleaned up nice! check www.partsnmore.com for the rubber bits you need. Get yourself a petcock rebuild kit. I think they're $20 or so and well worth it. They come apart easy for cleaning and rebuild.

As far as your whole rebuild on the bike, if it's complete and in decent shape try and get her running first. Most likely you'll want to replace the points and condensors, clean the carbs, replace plugs, general tune up stuff really. If you have a solid running bike leave the motor alone and just ride the tits off of it. I've always loved scramblers. I went full cafe with mine because it was a $200 crusty turd. Complete restorable bikes I feel should be restored. All that being said, in the end it's your bike. If you have a vision of ripping around town on your very own garage built cafe then go for it. Keep up the build and pictures. Good luck.
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: Fox on Jan 17, 2012, 22:43:08
Yeah, it did actually. The bead marks with the tank liner do look a little rough, but that's about all they do. Didn't even realize they were happening till it was too late. Regardless, I'm really happy with how it came out and I highly reccomend the process to anyone with a old rusty tank. Definitely well worth it.

Currently, the plan is to get the bike running perfectly before I start on the actual restoration bit. I want to have the engine running like a damn top before I buy any actual cafe parts. Believe it or not, I got it running this weekend after I changed the oil. It was a pretty awesome feeling, not gonna lie. I'll post a video of the first turn over in a bit. That being said, it is not, in any way, running well. It backfired constantly and bogged down about every minute. But hey, it's running and that's a good step. I'm thinking the carbs are needing some jet work. I thought about giving them a bath this weekend, but they looked newly clean when I got down and checked. Sparkplugs are still shiny new, but I checked them after the bike kept bogging to make sure I had a good spark, and they were pretty wet and black. That's another reason why I'm thinking it's the jetting, running too rich. Anyone got some other ideas on this? Maybe the video will give you a better idea of what I'm working with.

As far as the direction I'm taking the bike, I'm going full cafe. Talkin chopped frame an' everything. I thought about doing it all original, but I know I wouldn't enjoy it as much as if I had my own Cafe Racer.

I'm trying to draw of a "To Do" list of sorts. You can find my current one in the first post of this thread. If you have any suggestions, I'd love to hear them.

Oh and, djelliott, thanks for the link. That's a great parts resource.
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: Fox on Jan 26, 2012, 20:05:19
I'm going to begin with the official tear-down tonight. Plan is to get as far into stripping and cleaning the engine that I can, then if I run into a problem, start checking/cleaning/pulling my electrical system. That should be enough for one night(this whole weekend).

What's that you say? I'm at college and I don't have a garage so where I am going to do this without losing that tiny little screw that just fell? Dear Friend. Just have a look at the photo below. I think you'll enjoy them.

(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1275.jpg)
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: Fox on Jan 31, 2012, 17:24:13
Just a quick update.

Right now I'm working on breaking the bike down to the bare frame. I've taken the engine out of the frame, and I plan to do a full tear down to get every piece of grime out of there. I'm going home this weekend so my plan is to break it down, clean it, and build it back up while I'm home. Unfortunately I'll probably have to do another tear down to replace all my gaskets when I get them. Which leads me into my next topic.

I just ordered the majority of the parts that I'm going to be putting on my bike. You know, the usual, clip ons, bar ends, new taillight/blinkers. The works. I added in a few extra goodies that I'm really excited about. I'm also working with Sonreir on making some custom gauge faces to go with my bike's aesthetic. If it all works as planned, it's gonna be so sweet. I'm also trying to talk Chrisb1 into making me a custom seat. He's got some awesome renderings on his build thread, and I'd love to have something like that on my ride.

Here's a couple shots.
(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/IMG_1389.jpg)
(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/IMG_1393.jpg)
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: G3Sam on Jan 31, 2012, 17:37:15
Cool bike! I can't wait to see how she turns out. 
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: 1chrisb on Jan 31, 2012, 22:52:03
So how pretty is this penny of yours that you were offering? ;)
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: Fox on Jan 31, 2012, 23:01:09
So how pretty is this penny of yours that you were offering? ;)

He he. I was wondering when you were gonna ask. What are you thinking?
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: 1chrisb on Jan 31, 2012, 23:45:08
PM sent.
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: Fox on Jan 31, 2012, 23:49:16
PM sent.

Haven't gotten it yet.
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: 1chrisb on Feb 01, 2012, 00:06:12
Sorry, I started replying here, then realized it would be better PMed, so I just posted that and started the PM. Had to think for a while!
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: Fox on Feb 11, 2012, 00:00:07
I've been going and going all week, so I haven't had a chance to post up my work from last weekend, but here it is now!

1. Cleaned the front forks, put in new seals and dust boots, and changed the fluids. Was in dire need of a fluid change. The stuff I poured out was GREEN! It was a total pain and very messy, but I'm glad it got done.

2. De-rusted and painted my exhaust. I'm gonna be wrapping it so the paint wasn't exactly neccesary, but I figured it would freeze all the rust and keep it nice and clean!

Pics are below

This weekend was going to be dedicated to breaking down and cleaning my engine, but I can't seem to get past step one. The alternator retaining bolt turns the whole engine, and I can't hold the alternator tight enough to prevent that. Anyone got any ideas?

Also, I'm going for a brushed aluminum look on all the bare metal, so I've been hitting everything I can with sand paper. 80, 120, 220, 400, 600. It's coming out O.K, but I can't get the real "brushed" look. Ideas on this as well?

I'm going tomorrow to get some of the tabs grinded off, then next week it's going to powder coating! I know it's been done a million and a half times, but I'm gonna go with a black frame. I debated on a blue frame, but it's just not my style. I prefer sort of low-profile/subdued...beauty(for lack of a better term). So, I'll be posting pics of that.

Of course, any feedback is welcome. Let's get those 2 Cents jingling!

(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1420.jpg)

(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1416.jpg)

(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1422.jpg)
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: Fox on Feb 11, 2012, 00:01:30
I figured this deserved it's own post.

PARTS!!!!
...minus the oranges.

(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1424.jpg)
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: vain on Feb 16, 2012, 05:12:30
Yo Fox!  8)

How's it goin with the build? Engine blasted yet?  :)
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: Fox on Feb 16, 2012, 14:40:05
Yo Fox!  8)

How's it goin with the build? Engine blasted yet?  :)

Vain!

No actually I haven't. I was in Lowes the other week picking up some paint and ended up getting a bunch of sandpaper with it. I got the idea to go over my crankcase with it (80,180,220,400,600) and it came out exactly like I wanted it. I think instead of blasting I'll just sand it myself. Here's a shot of how it came out.

(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/photo-1.jpg)

In other news, The frame is getting it's final metalwork done tonight(Shortening the frame) and then it's off to powder-coating tomorrow. Yee haw.
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: vain on Feb 17, 2012, 01:58:10
I got the idea to go over my crankcase with it (80,180,220,400,600

Sounds like a hell of a job? the cover looks a little ruff, are you going to paint the engine covers or polishing them?
did you use sandpaper on the engine, cyl, and head as well?

I gotta say, you got the force with you if you "handblasted" all the components  8)

anywho, the best is that you're happy with he result. :)

Lucky you, getting the frame done, every time i go into the garage i find something new to cut off or weld on :) but i think i'm getting it sandblasted by the end of next week.
and i decided not to go with powdercoat this time. i want to keep the possibilities open for painting it in any color if i come up with something cool for a paint theme. 

have you ever heard of myrphys law? guess what happened last night,... i was out there and thought i'd check over my engine after i put it back together and would you know the fu.... would not shift gears. i had to take the whole reassembled engine back down to pieces.  found NOTHING wrong. and now it shifts gears. guess something had to much tension or something. . i think i cried in my sleep.  :P

Post more pics of engine and other progress, fun to look :)
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: 1chrisb on Feb 17, 2012, 11:11:53
Looks to me like he's going for a brushed aluminum look. I dig it.  8) I would probably clear it though, to prevent it from oxidation and corrosion. Not sure what effect that will have on the finish, if it'll keep the brushed look or not.
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: Fox on Feb 17, 2012, 12:56:35
Man, it's good to hear from you guys! I felt like I was just talking to my self on here.

You are correct Chris. I'm going for brushed. I'm not much of a chrome person myself, but I didn't want everything to be black. Brushed seemed like the natural alternative. I will be shooting the jugs black though then sanding the fins to bring back the exposed metal. I can't get in between the fins, so my hands were almost tied there. Haha Vain, my fingers don't feel like they've got the force. They feel like I've been sanding 40 years of oxidation off aluminum with sandpaper for 3 hours straight!

As far as clearing it goes, I'm definitely gonna be doing that on the outer case(Crankcase, Alternator, etc) and on the jugs but since Rustoleum High-Heat has a curing period, I might just say forget it for the bottom end. Too much work to fit that thing in the oven! Actually, just found out that I don't have to bake anything, so it will all be getting a few coats of clear.

I decided not to shorten the frame. The only place you can cut it and the rear wheel still have enough travel room is right behind the shocks, and I didn't really want my frame that short. I may regret that in the future, but that's what it is and I'm sticking to it.

Ah, yeah, I thought a lot about painting my frame, but I would have just shot it black anyway, so it didn't seem worth it. Plus I would have had to drop quite a few bones to get it sandblasted(No way I would hand sand my whole frame) and I think when I got it quoted, it there was a $60 price difference for powder. Figured it would make my life easier, so why not?

HAHA I have heard of Myrphy's and that is an awesome example of it. Man that is the absolute worst. Funny though. I'm more impressed that you can tear your engine down and build it back up in one night. Impressive!

Before I post some pictures, where are yall's bikes?! Chris last time I saw where you at was over a week ago, and Vain I've never even see your bike. CMON!

Surgery...
(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1451.jpg)

(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1449.jpg)

And how it looks now.
(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1459.jpg)

(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1458.jpg)

(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1454.jpg)

Progress on the engine.
(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1457.jpg)
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: vain on Feb 17, 2012, 13:31:37
Gonna be a cool bike fox. i like the idea of brushed covers. :)

How's the ears? funny thing seeing you with the grinder and sparks everywhere and the protectors hangin 2 inches away :D haha.

Did you check out my "lonely" build thread? it's pics of how it used to be and some work at least.

uploading some new ones now..
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: Fox on Feb 17, 2012, 15:02:18
Thanks man. I'm pretty stoked. I'm ready to be putting it back together. Been sitting on my living room floor for too long now.

Haha, that's actually not me. That's Matt, a crazy-ass metalworker I know in town. He had earplugs and I had ear protectors.

I did go take a look actually. Pretty sick stuff you've got goin on over there. Can't wait to see how it all turns out.
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: ducatiboy on Feb 17, 2012, 16:02:06
Nice looking side covers Fox :) I like the added texture you get with the brushed look. I might think about that for mine instead of paint
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: 1chrisb on Feb 17, 2012, 16:22:57
I'm also not much of a chrome guy. Nor am I a sit-on-your-ass-polishing-for-100-hours guy either.  :D I had actually thought about having a brushed finish on various parts of the bike, now you're making me think about it some more. ;) I have been super busy with work lately, but I did get the seat mold finished. Been working on designing my tank, got that done last weekend. Now I'm working on designing a triple tree.  ;D Found out a friend of mine has a much larger sandblaster on a farm that I can use, so I will be getting the frame and maybe some various other parts blasted this weekend. Cherish your free time while you have it...working 9-10 hour days + Saturdays does not leave much time for wrenching!
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: DesmoBro on Feb 17, 2012, 19:43:53
Epic Living Room Build
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: cafecustom720 on Feb 17, 2012, 20:06:44
I've thought about doing the brushed look and after seeing you do it I'm gonna have to do it some day.
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: Fox on Feb 18, 2012, 19:37:57
Thanks for all the compliments guys. Much appreciated! I actually really like how everything is looking. Brushed is a great option if you want raw metal, but don't want to polish till your fingers bleed. Don't get me wrong though, it isn't a walk in the park either. With that being said, few things have happened since my last post.

Put two coats of clear on the engine cases that have already been sanded(Prevent further oxidation), and It looks GREAT! Gives it a nice glossy sheen so it will still sparkle in the sun, but doesn't take away from the brushed look. I just shot them so I don't know what it's gonna look like dry, but so far I love it.

I wrapped up the exhaust. Only took me one 1x50 roll from DCC. Napa steel-ties on the end.

I started sanding down both my wheels and forks. Forks are coming along nicely and I'll post a picture of them when I finish. As far as my wheels go, I might just blast those suckers. It nearly impossible to get them clean by hand-sanding.

Frame is at the powder coater and should be back in two weeks, so my goal is to have all parts ready for reassembly when it returns. Hope this works out.

Pictures of course.

(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1476.jpg)

(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1477.jpg)

(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1478.jpg)

(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1482.jpg)
 

I've been keeping this one close to the chest, but here's a sneak peek at what's to come!
(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1480.jpg)
Title: Re: First bike, First project!
Post by: Fox on Feb 18, 2012, 19:38:53
Epic Living Room Build

THANK YOU for noticing. I've been waiting for someone to mention it! Not gonna lie, I feel pretty damn cool doing all this in my apartment.

Chris, all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.
Just remember, in college, you don't have the money for all the neat little toys you can afford when you have a job!
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: 1chrisb on Feb 19, 2012, 00:42:33
A cruel reality about life. Time, or money. I did get my frame blasted today though! (Hmm, maybe I should be updating my OWN build thread... ::))
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: vain on Feb 19, 2012, 09:17:13
This looks good Fox, can't wait to see the bike finished.
Keep it up!  8)
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: progriffen on Feb 20, 2012, 22:38:58
I like the idea of living room build fox!

I'm also in a similar situation as you are being in college, building my cb400t in my living room.

Haha Gonna follow your post everyday
Keep it up!
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: atx360 on Feb 20, 2012, 23:25:39
Nice build fox
Looks a lot like where mine is going although mine is in the garage:D

I also have hand brushed my covers and fork legs. I'm not too big on chrome either. How do u plan on keeping them looking polished? I'm still up in the air there.

I like your style on both the living room and the build. :P
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: SCARE! on Feb 20, 2012, 23:31:47
if you use a scotchbrite pad from the kitchen on those cases, they will come up even better. i hand sanded all mine. makes ya feel like you've done some real work huh!
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: atx360 on Feb 20, 2012, 23:48:31
I did scotchbrite then I did mothers mag and aluminum Polish. Just don't want them to oxidize too much.
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: Fox on Feb 20, 2012, 23:56:08
Progriffin,
Haha a fellow living room builder is always welcome. We may not have all the fancy tools, but damn if we don't still do quality work! Do you have any picture of your current get up? Maybe you could start up a build thread, I'd like to follow along with ya. By the way, thats an awesome avatar picture. Is that you?

Thanks for all the compliments gents(Chris and Vain always good to hear from y'all)! Glad to have you guys on board. I haven't made much progress since my last posting, but next on the list is painting the jugs and cleaning/sanding the bottom cases. Pictures should be up soon.

SCARE!
I actually did use a scotch brite after each level of sanding. Get all the metal shavings out of there and such. Those things really were designed to work on motorcycles...

Atx360
As far as keeping them clean, I put two coats of Rustoleum Engine Enamel(500F) clear coat on all the engine pieces. Hoping that should keep all th oxidation and rust off of it.  I'll grab a few pictures of all the finished pieces and toss them up so you can check it out.

A quick to-do list for this week(mostly for my own benefit)...
Paint engine
Media blast rims
Sand and clear coat forks
Rebuild gauges(if I have time)

Keep an eye out for pictures/posts, and if you have comments/questions, don't hesitate to ask.
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: SCARE! on Feb 20, 2012, 23:57:07
I did scotchbrite then I did mothers mag and aluminum Polish. Just don't want them to oxidize too much.

same. good stuff.  8)
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: progriffen on Feb 21, 2012, 00:28:13
Yep thats me in a another ride I love the most Fixed Gear Bike. Also known as fixie. Modification of a track bike. Without any brakes, only stops with you foot pedaling backwards.

I was never interested in 4 wheels haha always two wheels. now my eyes turned from bicycle to motorcycle thats all but.

Cafe racer is such a addicting project that I can't let go.

As soon as I get her running first, I will be posting a build thread of non-loved(crappy looking frame which made all the people hate to modify into a cafe racer) cb400t to a Cafe Racer.

I will be following yours and steal some ideas from you

Is that cool? :)
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: Fox on Feb 21, 2012, 10:04:27
Yep thats me in a another ride I love the most Fixed Gear Bike. Also known as fixie. Modification of a track bike. Without any brakes, only stops with you foot pedaling backwards.
I was never interested in 4 wheels haha always two wheels. now my eyes turned from bicycle to motorcycle thats all but.
Cafe racer is such a addicting project that I can't let go.
As soon as I get her running first, I will be posting a build thread of non-loved(crappy looking frame which made all the people hate to modify into a cafe racer) cb400t to a Cafe Racer.
I will be following yours and steal some ideas from you
Is that cool? :)

Very cool! Yeah I actually ride a fixie myself, but the difference is I have front brakes! You must be pretty nuts to ride with no brakes at all! Yeah, I feel ya on the addiction bit. I used to swear against motorcycle, but once I started looking at cafe's it was all out of my hands. I had to get one. What city is that picture in?

Ok cool! I'll be keeping an eye out for it. And no. You may not in any circumstances steal ANY of my ideas[sarcasm]. Take what you want my man!
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: vain on Feb 21, 2012, 10:14:16
You must be pretty nuts to ride with no brakes at all!

I used to ride my '49 panhead with no front brakes, suicide shift and only some poor rear drum brakes...
Now i got a front drum brake on it, but i guess my death will be on the old pan  :P

Sorry bout the off topic post, just had to say  ???
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: progriffen on Feb 21, 2012, 13:17:49
That pic was taken from my friend at 34th between 7th and 8th avenue in New York.

I live in PA and took a bus trip to NJ with my bike and started to travel for almost 200miles to NYC last year.

Now I am planning on doing that with cafe racer I am gonna make.


Alright I should get some work done to show off some progress I am having.

Keep up the good work man!
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: PjkF on Mar 03, 2012, 01:49:53
Looking good so far!

I must admit, I am a little bit jealous of the fact that you are building this in the comfort of your living room.
I said something in passing to my landlord, that was either a really great idea, or a absolute disaster of a decision.
Long story short, it's in a buddy's garage rather than in my living room.

I bet having the bike there really helps with getting the tedious things done easier! Tinker here, tinker there.

I also wish I had a tube frame rather than the stamped steel. But hey, work with what you got right?

/end rant

I can't wait to see what your finished engine is going to look like. I like the raw material shiny bits.
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: Ringo on Mar 03, 2012, 01:57:34
Not sure if anyone else mentioned it, but keep an eye on that Kreme liner.  That stuff has been known to give people all sorts of trouble after being immersed in gas for a while.  It seems to be the most failure-prone liner out there.
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: vain on Mar 15, 2012, 02:46:11
how's it going Fox?  8)
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: Fox on Mar 24, 2012, 21:49:31
Howdy Gents,

So, quick apology for my lacking online presence recently. School has been one big project to the next, and I've gone out of town for the past two weekends. I'm not on spring break, and I've stayed at school just so I can finish working on my bike. My goal is to have everything on the bike except for seat and handlebars(found out the ones I had were the wrong size. Go figure).

Now, on to real updates. I'll lead off with this.

ROLLING FRAME BABY! Oh yeah.
(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1522.jpg)

Haha, I'm excited. Maybe a little too much, but hey, whatever. Got new tires mounted and cleaned up the rims as best as I could. Here are some close ups of the tires.
(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1523.jpg)

(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1524.jpg)

Next up is painting the top end of the engine. Working on that all tomorrow, then Monday I get the valves reinstalled and start to reassemble. Yee haw! Keep an eye out, updates should be plentiful this coming week. Hope everyones doin' well!
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: madmatt1 on Mar 24, 2012, 23:15:21
I just caught wind of this build you've got going on- very impressive! I thought I was pretty cool for working on my bike down in my basement- you've got me beat! Nice job so far!
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: PjkF on Mar 25, 2012, 14:32:38
It's looking great! What size tires did you end up getting for the front/back? They look like they're the perfect size. And that frame is looking all sorts of sweet. A frame in a fresh coat of black always looks nice. (especially a de-tabbed one)
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: Fox on Mar 27, 2012, 21:02:16
I just caught wind of this build you've got going on- very impressive! I thought I was pretty cool for working on my bike down in my basement- you've got me beat! Nice job so far!

Heh Heh. Yeah, pretty nutso. Can't say I wouldn't trade placews with you though. Living space and Garage have a hard time coexisting.

It's looking great! What size tires did you end up getting for the front/back? They look like they're the perfect size. And that frame is looking all sorts of sweet. A frame in a fresh coat of black always looks nice. (especially a de-tabbed one)

Thanks! Tires are 2.75x18 front and 3.5x18 back. They came out really well actually. Pretty happy with them. Ah! I know! Puts all the parts I didn't get powder coated to shame! Some pictures of progress will be up later tonight.
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: Fox on Mar 30, 2012, 22:40:52
Worked all day reassembling the engine and getting it back on the frame. Here's where were at now. Pretty damn good feeling.

(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1536.jpg)

Seat isn't mounted yet, but I threw it on for the picture. I'm a little embarrassed to say that I ordered a seat from DCC instead of making my own, but being that the only workspace I have is my apartment, I decided it wasn't exactly within my capability right now and I'lll make one when I have a dedicated garage/house/workspace. Sucks, but it is what it is.

Next big project I'm planning to tackle is how to mount all my electrics(Condenser, fuse box, etc). Don't see a great way to do it, so if you have ideas, I'd love to hear them.

Alright, I'm going to crash. 8a.m.- 9p.m. of straight wrenching oddly took it out of me. See you boys on the flipside.
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: tron97 on Mar 30, 2012, 23:23:04
Builds looking great,

For mounting your electronics you should just make a simple little steel or aluminum pan that fits under the rear cowl, and is bolted down to the frame rails.

That gives you a nice flat space to bolt everything down to, and is hidden by the rear bubble.

P,s...im building my bike in a spare bedroom!
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: Fox on Mar 31, 2012, 15:16:35
Unfortunately, I didn't chop my frame, so I've got this big metal hump, so I can't make a flat aluminum surface to work on. I might make one that bolts on the rear hoop. and put my battery there. Wish I didn't have to drill into the frame. We'll see how it all works out. Thanks for the help!
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: jen on Apr 01, 2012, 21:34:22
nice work! i fell for the cl's and have a 72 175, and a 75 360 like yours. the paint on the tank is faded, looks like several gasoline overflows. looking forward to the finished product!
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: Fox on Apr 01, 2012, 22:00:07
Hey cool! A 175? I didn't even know they made them that small. Is that a one cylinder? I'd love to see some pictured of your bikes if you've got them.

You right when you say the gas tank is in rough shape. I didn't want to paint it until I had my seat made, and I still haven't empirically decided on a paint scheme. I've got a few ideas, but can't decide my favorite. I might try and do some mock ups on Photoshop if I can figure out how to do it. Anyone got some insight on this?

Carbs/grips/controls are on. Here's an updated shot.
(http://i1095.photobucket.com/albums/i465/MPCWatkins/Motorcycles/1975%20Honda%20CL360/IMG_1540.jpg)

For next week I've got to mount the electric components, mount my seat, attach 2-1 throttle cable to carbs(Not sure how to do this. Anyone have experience with doing this on Mikunis?), and mount rear brake light. I'm sure I'll have to chase down a few gremlins in the electrical system, but once I get those carbs figured out, I should be ready to fill up and give it a crank! That'll be exciting. I'm projecting two weeks until it's road worthy. I think...
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: CBs_CB on May 03, 2012, 03:28:58
Good looking so far...keep it going!
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: Fox on May 03, 2012, 16:32:55
Not a great update, but it's been so long. My bike got kicked out of my apartment and I've just now got done with finals, so I haven't been able to work on it at all. My brother is taking it back to my Dad's house right now, and I have all the final parts that I need to make it run and ride it, but not time to put them on. Maybe sometime in the next week. I'll post something more when something actually happens. Sorry for such a lame update!
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: PjkF on May 03, 2012, 17:42:44
That sucks man! But it's a good thing you got a lot of it done when you could work on it so comfortably!
You'll get 'er done!
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: DesmoBro on May 20, 2012, 12:29:22
bike is looking good! sorry to hear you've had to move out of the living room One step closer the road tho! I love the exhaust on these makes me want to build a different exhaust for mine
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: drummingpariah on May 27, 2012, 21:51:51
Fox, I'm loving this build. Everything about it is full of heart. I really just want to see it running with you on it. Get that sucker on the road!
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: rock2d2 on Jun 11, 2012, 23:38:58
Watching!
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: Fox on Jun 11, 2012, 23:46:30
Hehe, it's these unexpected posts that remind me I have this thread.

My Dad and I spent about 4 hours trying to get the CL started this weekend. I gerry-rigged my new ignition coils (Read:Zipties), but it was all to no avail. We had a strong spark, good compression, and fuel in the bowls (Even sprayed staring ether directly into the cylinder and into the carbs. Like I said, no dice.

I'm thinking it's timing, but who really knows. We'll be doing a thorough going over sometime soon (hopefully). I just want this thing to run to be honest. Tough to stay motivated when I work all weekend and get no results, and when the bike is 45 minutes away. Stick with me, I'll get it. Just takes more time now. That's all for now!
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: 1chrisb on Jun 12, 2012, 00:29:41
I just may beat you yet! Muahahahaaaa...
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: Fox on Apr 04, 2014, 20:00:52
Hello everybody,

Been a while. Hope you are all well and your bikes are even better.

About a month out from graduating from college which means I have a good bit of time now and will have even more after May 10, so I figured I'd get back in the swing of things and see if I can't get this thing started and road worthy.

It's hard to remember everything that was going on way back when, but from what I recall, I ran into issues with screw breaking in my engine. I haven't looked again because I was just getting my work bench set up to start working again today, but I remember need to buy a tap/dye set before everything slowed down on the project. So, searching craiglsit for one of those now.

Will post more as more things get done. Just a quick one to say I'm back.
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: DesmoBro on Apr 04, 2014, 20:05:30
Good to have u back
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: Fox on Apr 14, 2014, 17:26:58
So rethreading is proving to a bit of a challenge as most places around here don't have the dies that I need. I got taps though and have been working, thought I'd post a few things I'd learned, might be useful for anyone out there looking to do some rethreading...

1. You're best bet if you want to start working is to buy a kit and start building from there. I tried to buy piecemeal, but found that I got mixed up with what exactly is the right thread, and does this tap actually fit what I've got... Not something you want to be thinking as you grind off metal inside your engine. A set makes it nice and easy to know what you've got, and if you find you need more taps, you can always add later. I just ordered this one (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000HBC75S/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER). I'll post some pictures and notes on quality when it comes in.

2. If that price tag is a bit scary, you can get by without buying T-handles and all that and just use an adjustable wrench. Not as easy when the engine is in the frame, but it does alright.

3. Put a few drops of oil in the hole or on the bolt when you're rethreading. Helps make things turn smoother and makes the metal shavings stick to the tap/die better so they're not staying in your engine.

4. Don't turn the tap ALL the way down on the first go around. Give the tap a half turn and then backtrack. Imagine on a clock. Go from 12 to 6, then back to 12. Return to 6, turn to 12, back to 6. And so on.

5. If you sand blast your engine YOU MUST TAP YOUR HOLES!!!! Someone told me to do this when I was asking about blasting my engine block and I didn't listen and now I have a broken bolt in my head because of it. The amount of crud I've pulled out of some of these holes is pretty incredible. No wonder the bolts wouldn't turn...

6. Go slow.

7. Make sure your tap is straight when you start it. It should go in with a little resistance, but just make sure you've got it on right. I was worried about messing this up, but most times the tap sort of found it's way.

8. CL360 needs a 10x1.25 for the 8 bolts on the head and a 6mmx1.00 for the 6 other bolts, for anyone out there wondering. 10mm and 6mm are a pretty common bolt on this and many other bikes, so they're not bad to have around.

That's all I've got at the moment. Happy to answer questions if anyone has em.
Title: Re: Living Room Build - Notes on taps/dies
Post by: SONIC. on Apr 14, 2014, 17:38:30
Price tag doesn't need to be scary, you can buy a cheap set for use in aluminum up front and then add good ones as you go to tap into steel. I have had good luck with cheap taps and dies, you just have to be careful not to break them off in the hole haha.
As for sandblasting, this is true. Your best bet is to get a dental pick and loosen up the packed in sand and then vacuum it out, repeat this a few times and then tap. If its packed in there the tap isnt going to do any good.
Title: Re: Living Room Build - Notes on taps/dies
Post by: Fox on Apr 14, 2014, 19:03:48
Price tag doesn't need to be scary, you can buy a cheap set for use in aluminum up front and then add good ones as you go to tap into steel. I have had good luck with cheap taps and dies, you just have to be careful not to break them off in the hole haha.
As for sandblasting, this is true. Your best bet is to get a dental pick and loosen up the packed in sand and then vacuum it out, repeat this a few times and then tap. If its packed in there the tap isnt going to do any good.

Yeah, that's a way to go about it. I saw quite a few 40 pc. sets for $35ish. Thought about it, but I just prefer to get good stuff up front that way I don't got to worry about it later.

A few more tips on tapping,

9. A toothbrush works wonders for cleaning off the goopy crap when you pull the tap out.

10. After you've run the tap through once to set the threads, reapply oil and run it though again to get anything else from the hole. Repeat until tap comes out clean.

and a photo to show you some of the nasty stuff that comes out of your engine...
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: fresh_c on Apr 14, 2014, 22:11:46
2. If that price tag is a bit scary, you can get by without buying T-handles and all that and just use an adjustable wrench. Not as easy when the engine is in the frame, but it does alright.

5. If you sand blast your engine YOU MUST TAP YOUR HOLES!!!! Someone told me to do this when I was asking about blasting my engine block and I didn't listen and now I have a broken bolt in my head because of it. The amount of crud I've pulled out of some of these holes is pretty incredible. No wonder the bolts wouldn't turn...

Taps in particular are not somewhere to be cheap.  If you can't afford a set, buy the sizes you need as you need them.  Buy American.  Most of what you wrote is spot on, but there are a couple points I don't agree with.

#2 - Not a good idea to use an adjustable wrench since it side loads the tap and WILL break smaller taps.  T-handles are cheap and essential to properly turning the tap.

#5  If you are working with holes that are already tapped, you should be using a tap make specifically for rethreading.  A standard tap will remove material from the threads, causing weaker holes, but a rethreading tap restores the threads without removing material.

I'll add #11, do it right the first time because removing a broken tap is worse than slamming you hand in the car door.
Title: Re: Living Room Build
Post by: xb33bsa on Apr 14, 2014, 22:32:18
Taps in particular are not somewhere to be cheap.  If you can't afford a set, buy the sizes you need as you need them.  Buy American.  Most of what you wrote is spot on, but there are a couple points I don't agree with.

#2 - Not a good idea to use an adjustable wrench since it side loads the tap and WILL break smaller taps.  T-handles are cheap and essential to properly turning the tap.

#5  If you are working with holes that are already tapped, you should be using a tap make specifically for rethreading.  A standard tap will remove material from the threads, causing weaker holes, but a rethreading tap restores the threads without removing material.

I'll add #11, do it right the first time because removing a broken tap is worse than slamming you hand in the car door.

well said
and if you must sand/bead/media blast any parts with threaded holes just plug them with some spare screws/bolts  use some wax to seal the threads when doing so
to sand blast something and just fill the unprotected threaded holes with gritty media , is just silly
same goes for any oil passages seal em up first
Title: Re: Living Room Build - Notes on taps/dies
Post by: cb400f caferacer on Apr 15, 2014, 04:10:49
Great work man! i wish my gf would let me build it in the house! keep it up!
Title: Re: Living Room Build - Notes on taps/dies
Post by: Fox on Apr 16, 2014, 13:25:45
Taps in particular are not somewhere to be cheap.  If you can't afford a set, buy the sizes you need as you need them.  Buy American.  Most of what you wrote is spot on, but there are a couple points I don't agree with.

#2 - Not a good idea to use an adjustable wrench since it side loads the tap and WILL break smaller taps.  T-handles are cheap and essential to properly turning the tap.

#5  If you are working with holes that are already tapped, you should be using a tap make specifically for rethreading.  A standard tap will remove material from the threads, causing weaker holes, but a rethreading tap restores the threads without removing material.

I'll add #11, do it right the first time because removing a broken tap is worse than slamming you hand in the car door.

Good points. Always good to have the right tools for the job. And thanks for the tip on taps. Are there any ways to differentiate between the two?

well said
and if you must sand/bead/media blast any parts with threaded holes just plug them with some spare screws/bolts  use some wax to seal the threads when doing so
to sand blast something and just fill the unprotected threaded holes with gritty media , is just silly
same goes for any oil passages seal em up first

Yeah, I was wanting to mention that. Someone also recommended that to me, but of course, I didn't listen. I think I put paper towel in there, but from what I remember (it was about 2 years ago) they blew out. So, to everyone thinking of media blasting, plug them holes! 

Great work man! i wish my gf would let me build it in the house! keep it up!

Haha! Yeah, that was a trip. Still can't believe I did that. I've got a garage now, and it's really nice.
Title: Re: Living Room Build - Notes on taps/dies
Post by: fresh_c on Apr 16, 2014, 15:34:49
Good points. Always good to have the right tools for the job. And thanks for the tip on taps. Are there any ways to differentiate between the two?

This video does a pretty good job explaining the difference.  As a note, there are very similar kits offered from Snap-On, Craftsman, and MAC, but the actual manufacturer of the kit is Kastar.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7q41yt-PKJw (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7q41yt-PKJw)
Title: Re: Living Room Build - Notes on taps/dies
Post by: Fox on Apr 16, 2014, 19:05:38
This video does a pretty good job explaining the difference.  As a note, there are very similar kits offered from Snap-On, Craftsman, and MAC, but the actual manufacturer of the kit is Kastar.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7q41yt-PKJw (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7q41yt-PKJw)

Well, shit. How big of a deal is this really? I've already cut threads with a non rethreading tap. And the set I just got in is the wrong kind. 

Here's a link for a Craftsman rethreading kit for anyone coming later...
http://www.sears.com/craftsman-40-pc-tap-and-die-set-master/p-00952105000P (http://www.sears.com/craftsman-40-pc-tap-and-die-set-master/p-00952105000P)
Title: Re: Living Room Build - Notes on taps/dies
Post by: xb33bsa on Apr 16, 2014, 19:43:26
to clean dirty threads i just make my own chaser/cleaner
as stated using a tap for cleaning threads is not a good idear because of the danger of oversizing the threads
what i do is just use a very good or new high grade bolt/screw then file just one deep groove in it at the tip like a tap has
then power wire wheel it to remove any burs and to slightly "dull" it so it really won't cut metal but it will clean out dirty threads handily, use some light oil
i have been using this method for decades works a treat
Title: Re: Living Room Build - Notes on taps/dies
Post by: fresh_c on Apr 16, 2014, 20:27:20
Well, shit. How big of a deal is this really? I've already cut threads with a non rethreading tap. And the set I just got in is the wrong kind. 

Here's a link for a Craftsman rethreading kit for anyone coming later...
http://www.sears.com/craftsman-40-pc-tap-and-die-set-master/p-00952105000P (http://www.sears.com/craftsman-40-pc-tap-and-die-set-master/p-00952105000P)

Probably not a big deal.  Nothing to stress over but just something to learn from for future builds.
Title: Re: Living Room Build - Notes on taps/dies
Post by: Fox on Apr 16, 2014, 21:22:33
Cool. Thank you both for your help.

I'll try cutting out a bolt and using that. Will post results.