DO THE TON

Blood Sweat Tears and Grease => Projects => Specials => Topic started by: Treesus on Nov 24, 2012, 01:52:27

Title: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Nov 24, 2012, 01:52:27
Hello Ton-ers,

This is not a really cafe project. I am really into small-bike long-distance travel, so most of these changes are pointed in that direction. I am putting this up here to glean some of the wonderful wisdom available from you mad-tinkerers. Much thanks to the wizard PJ who has already helped me immensely by putting up with my questions and anyone else who has posted a useful tidbit somewhere in this vast series of magical tubes we call the internet.

Now for a wordy introduction to foster understanding of the project for anyone who cares. Maybe no one.

When I got the bike it looked like any other stock 360. It had a few dents and scrapes, but nothing major and after a good tuning of the engine, pedals and cables it was a great ride. I eventually changed a few minor items like the bars and headlight unit, put on some better tires, and attempted to get better flow out of the stock pipes by cutting out the baffles about 6 inches in from the end.

Before making camp on my second long trip. Burlap bag on the back is a gas can, black side bag is full of tools.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/ARIZONA09341-1.jpg)

Anyhow, after a few 2-4,000 mile road trips on this tiny champ I decided I wanted longer range for those intimidatingly long stretches of desert without carrying a gas can on the back. I also wanted the pegs moved to a position more comfortable for someone my height but not way back where everyone puts rear-sets on these. Annnddd.... I also wanted to try boring and porting an engine purely because I had never done it. Suddenly I wanted to build my own bike out of this... well, shift. Project time.

General Project Goals:
(there are items here people will warn me about, but most of the controversial stuff is already done)

~Increased capacity tank with elongated trials/cafe mix look that maintains an impression of original tank
              Add a crossfeed line for two halves to feed better. (Who hasn't run out of gas to find the right side still has plenty? Second reserve, I guess).
              Make the tank higher so that when I stack a sleeping bag and such on top I can use it to lean forward on during long rides (did this before and it helped my back and cut down on wind fatigue)

~Increase Displacement to 383” with GS850 +.5mm pistons

~Make engine more durable for long distance highway riding at 65mph (oil feed and gearing changes)

~New Clutch with stiffer springs (10% I believe, from Dime City). Original was slipping quite a bit.

~Custom foot peg and controls position

~Custom exhaust

~Extend 1.5” and strengthen/stiffen swingarm

~Brace frame for more stiffness

~Generally make it look extra badass

~Have Fun

I actually started working on this project in January 2012. With my comfortable, tool-stocked Utah workshop and consistent paychecks I was cruising along to have it well done and finished by April at the latest. However, it wasn't to be. I got a job opportunity that in terms of advancing my career I couldn't refuse. So, I sold most everything I own and spent that plus my savings to move up to Alaska and be a bush pilot apprentice. I have no regrets because everything is working out very well, but living up here is expensive and the pay is minimal which has left me eating ramen and still lacking any money for motorcycle work. Also, without a good portion of my tools and a solid workspace, I haven't been super motivated.

However, I've decided to get crafty and at least do what I can until I can start putting a bit more money in again.




So.... A sacrificial tank. I procured two beat up and rusy 360 tanks to Frankenstein into one super 383 tank. Aircraft Remover at work.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383AircraftRemover.jpg)

My highly missed former workspace with the engine pulled.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383EngineRemovedShop.jpg)

Here is a mock-up with an upper shell of the tank tack-welded to get an idea for the new profile. The headlight is too low because I just loosely set everything together and it slid down. Please excuse the poor picture quality.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383MockUpNewHalfTank.jpg)

Here is another mock up with the tank a bit further along. I learned MIG welding a thin steel tank is a pain is the arse, but it is possible with loads of patience. It looks rippled and uneven, but that is just a result of grinding off tiny slag and the beads. It is actually pretty smooth and didn't take too much pounding to get the curves right. The new tank is 3" longer, a total of 2" wider at the rear and .5" wider at the front, and on average about 1.25 inches taller. BUT, it still fits on the stock tank mounts with easy access to the rear rubber mount.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383MockUpTankSwingArmWelded.jpg)

The swingwarm is 1.5" longer than the stock and braced with square still tubing for most of the length of each side. The extension plugs (made by Wrench Tech Racing as a custom length kit) are pressed into each side of of the cut arm about an 1.25"
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383MockUpSwingarmExtension.jpg)


Now for the engine.
I had acquired some GS 850 pistons to add a grand total of 2.5mm to the diameter, and had it bored. I was originally going to do a resleeve for longevity but the motorcycle machinist who I was going to have do both the bore and sleeve talked me out of it (not easily, mind you) after measuring everything up. He said it was well within a durable range. We will see...

Anyhow. The rockers and cam had some pitting, so those will be sent off for resurfacing and hard facing as soon as the money rolls in. Pitting can be seen in these photos:
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383EngineRockerArms.jpg)
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383EngineCamPitting.jpg)

Also found my tensioner was mildly broken. Thanks to previous advice, I have a post-recall NOS tensioner sitting around already. It would be really nice if someone started making and selling a viable replacement piece for that.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383EngineBrokenTensioner.jpg)

Journals.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383EngineJournal1.jpg)
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383EngineJournal2.jpg)
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383EngineJournal3.jpg)
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383EngineJournalAll.jpg)

The cam journals definitely have some wear, although it wasn't bad enough to allow movement resulting in a leaking points seal. Thus, I'm not sure how serious this is. Any input here? Also, does anyone have a solution for this other than buying a new head? I read somewhere on here about someone putting a thin layer of JB Weld to fill in the grooves. If that was you, did it work?

Also, does anyone know a machinist or someone with a media blaster within 100 miles or so of Anchorage?

Whew that was a lot, but is all for now. Cheers,
Tree

Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Jan 21, 2013, 01:53:07
Got home after my shift out west and tore into the bike some more.

Got the lower end taken apart

I drilled out the stud oil feed hole. Hopefully not too large?
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/20130118_214021_zpsec6aba8c.jpg)

Cleaned everything out. Snuck much of it into my roommate's dishwasher after a a scrub and degreasing.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/20130119_002146_zps863cf8f4.jpg)

Did some drilling on the clutch basket. I couldn't find PJ's original post on this but I recall it being something along these lines, though more masterfully done.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/20130119_141719_zps8e071807.jpg)

Also thanks to PJ, decided to try my own variation on his idea for opening up the oil relief valve. Has anyone else tried this? I am looking for a 15% or so stiffer spring to replace the original with but no luck so far. I obviously haven't cleaned enough here yet.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/20130119_163817_zps533ef664.jpg)

(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/20130119_012819_zps5060b9ce.jpg)

Started putting everything back together in the upper case only to realize that have misplaced the grease seal kit at some point during my move to AK. I've looked everywhere. I think I may just have to order another one but the the man who seems to be the only supplier is out on vacation. Anyone know another source for the complete oil seal kits?

Anyhow, the motor is on hold.

With that I worked on the new footpegs and control mounts. I got some Tarozzi universal rearsets. I went with the folding pegs because I am not entirely sure about kickstarter clearance. But, I'll cross the bridge when I come to it.

The rearset mounts tacked on before final weld.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/20130120_134430_zpsee4ef8f4.jpg)

I also ground off the stamp welded spine of the frame about half-way and re-did it with a continuous bead. I would think this will somewhat stiffen that area of the frame. Maybe not, but I'll feel better about it either way.

(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/20130120_180638_zps83936634.jpg)




Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Jan 21, 2013, 01:56:53
I've really gotten used to working with the frame mostly bare metal. Am now considering powder coating the frame and cream/off white to match the stripe on the original tank. Eh?
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: sourjon on Jan 22, 2013, 12:11:35
In. Interesting take on this old bike thing. I do a lot of Adventuring on a KLR. Never considered an older smaller bike for it. Keep it coming.

John
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Finnigan on Jan 22, 2013, 13:34:34
Excited to see where this goes!
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: JustinLonghorn on Jan 22, 2013, 13:35:00
I can dig it, man. Purpose built machine.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: shamus on Jan 22, 2013, 13:43:32
Nothing constructive to add, just commenting because I like where it's going and want to see where it goes.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Jan 25, 2013, 19:03:22
Thanks everyone. I'll try to keep things interesting.

Well, I dropped the frame, swingarm, fork sleeves, and triple tree off to be zinc and powder coated. I decided on Antique White for the majority of the frame (to match the white striping on the tank). It may be too much, but I think it will end up pretty neat. More interesting than a boring black for certain. For the triple tree yokes, I wanted an accent color. Chose a color called New York Yellow to match the "CB" on the side cover and the plug wires.

The bushings where the shocks mount up to the swingarm were a pain to remove. Couldn't get them with a small press. Ended up just drilling out all the rubber so I could pull the innards out, they taking a hack saw blade to the outer ring. Hopefully the new ones won't be as difficult to get in.

Oil seals came today, so I will start back up on the engine before I have to leave back to work next week.

When you put the engine oil seals in, do you just sent them in and let them seal against the case, or do you put a small amount of liquid gasket on the case where it mates with the seal just like you would a case-case mating area?

The old ones I pulled out had some gasket residue on parts, but not all the way around. Definitely don't want them leaking at all, either way.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: muskywhisperr on Jan 25, 2013, 20:16:25
Like that tank work.  I have cl360 in the works which needs a new tank.  I have a nice cb350 tank but it just looks small.  Did you just tack weld it on the outside?
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Jan 25, 2013, 20:40:08
I tack welded to get everything fitted together, then did short beads at even intervals until it was fully welded. MIG welding thing tank steel is... tedious. But it doesn't leak.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Sonreir on Jan 25, 2013, 20:44:14
OK... I'm on board.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: muskywhisperr on Jan 25, 2013, 20:54:35
I weld for a living but for some reason that scares me.  Did it warp?  Are you using a 110 welder?  I am planning on riding my 360 to sturgis from WI this summer so I too want to put some miles on her.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Jan 25, 2013, 21:20:04
millin - Yes. Hobart 110v welder. Doing short beads while moving quickly was my attempt to keep the heat down and minimize the warping.
But yes, it still warped although not terribly.
Once I got the top shell completely welded I spend a fair amount of time with a rubber mallet, an assortment of 2x4s, and a 6x6 flat iron of the back of a table vice and just pounded the correct shape in like an olde worlde blacksmith. An English wheel would have been nice. Ground some of the beads down with a wheel and brush, then pounded some more. Turned out well in the end.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: NBraun on Jan 25, 2013, 22:19:05
Diggin the bike man!
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Jan 30, 2013, 04:30:57
Sonrier and NBraun - thanks.

My company has been having the required yearly recurrent training for all of us pilots this week. Make sure we all still remember the rules on flying planes. Basically days of sitting in a conference room trying not to slip into a coma with the rare interruption of an interesting discussion.

Anyhow, I finished getting the lower end back together.

Hopefully what this is all supposed to look like. Stuff in the gears is assembly-grease. I thought it would work into the cogs a bit better. Live and learn.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383Engine_zps106a3b14.jpg)

Put the new seals in. I just put a small amount of oil on my finger and ran it around the mating surface. Hopefully that will keep all the oil adequately inside.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383Engine-2_zps39300171.jpg)

I am a bit curious about these plates that rest under the crankshaft/rods. Only theory I could come up with on my own is that they help prevent too much oil from sloshing/splashing up into the moving crankshaft. Anyone with more experience have input on this?
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383Engine-3_zps56f2792f.jpg)
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383Engine-4_zps1ca5ee0f.jpg)
The crankshaft mechanism, for those who haven't yet seen one.


Organizational attempt at not ending up with orphan pieces.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383Engine-6_zps7fe9babd.jpg)



I put in heavier clutch springs and new friction plates. I didn't realize how thin my old ones had gotten until I compared the new and old. I knew I was going to change them out so I never measured their thickness but the old ones were pretty worn.

Anyhow, old spring-new spring. I'm sure you can tell which is which.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383Engine-7_zps765c0c0b.jpg)
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383Engine-8_zps4422835f.jpg)
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383Engine-9_zps2054b0d4.jpg)


Decided to try out an anti-friction coating since all the new performance pistons for cars and such seem to come with them. Why not? I made a drill bit piston holder and taped my drill trigger in the slowest setting to spray these. Turned out pretty uniform (even though in the picture it looks like there are irregularities it feels and looks consistent in person). Anyhow, I will need to check piston clearance tolerances. Any tips on how to do this?
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383Engine-10_zps029e9f1c.jpg)



Tank is pretty much done. I need to take it somewhere for finishing prep and paint. Decided I am not interested in attempting that aspect myself. Here are just a few size comparison photos next to a stock CB360 tank.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383Engine-11_zps0d514594.jpg)
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383Engine-12_zps1beb0abc.jpg)

New tank is somewhere around 4.8-4.9 gallons compared to the stock 2.9 (2.8 with the dent on the other side of my old tank, hah). Measured that with a kitchen measuring cup, so it may be a bit off the standardized gallon.

Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: JustinLonghorn on Jan 30, 2013, 09:42:47
Very nice, man.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: DesmoBro on Jan 30, 2013, 11:39:05
sweet treesus
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Sonreir on Jan 30, 2013, 11:47:49
I am a bit curious about these plates that rest under the crankshaft/rods. Only theory I could come up with on my own is that they help prevent too much oil from sloshing/splashing up into the moving crankshaft. Anyone with more experience have input on this?

Got it in one.

Quote from: Treesus
Anyhow, I will need to check piston clearance tolerances. Any tips on how to do this?
Mic the pistons and the bore and then subtract one from the other.  I can't remember off the top of my head, but the exact procedure is listed in the manual along with the specs.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Tim on Jan 31, 2013, 22:24:50
Have those same splash plates in my 1966 CA95's engine case below the crank.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: jchek779 on Feb 01, 2013, 18:19:18
That plate is called a windage plate or windage tray. It's exactly what you thought it was - to keep sump oil away from the crank throws, keeping as much oil in the sump as possible. It'd take a considerable amount of power away if those crank throws were sloshing around in oil.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Feb 03, 2013, 19:13:34
Thanks for all the info on the splash/windage plates, everyone.

Beautiful flying weather out here in St Mary's. Only 20*F and pretty clear. BUT... I can't wait to get off shift and work on the bike.

Been perusing rim options. I think I'm going to go 2.15" wide on the front, 2.50" on the rear. Though I'm not a huge fan of chrome (overused, I think), I do like the look of my stock chrome rims. I'm looking at aluminum for replacements, though. Trying to decide if silver will look nice enough, or if I should just go black. Hmmm.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Feb 19, 2013, 03:19:15
Finally back in Anchorage.

I picked up the frame and other various bits from the powder coater today. He did an alright job. I'm not blown away with it, that is for sure. Colors turned out pretty damn nice at least.
So, with the swingarm back, I put in the new bushings. I was worried this would be a royal pain in the arse but it went very smoothly. I put the bushings in the freezer for about 8 hours and heated up that part of the swingarm with a ceramic heater, then tapped them in with a rubber mallet. Cake.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383More-3_zpscc718cf4.jpg)

Not sure if the baking did this or if the guy somehow crushed it. Trying to think of a good way to gently bend it back.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383More-4_zps41c085bf.jpg)

Putting copper coat on the copper base gasket (from Copper Gaskets Unlimited - Lani is awesome to work with).
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383More_zpseeb747e2.jpg)

Cross-hatching in the cylinder bore. Very nice bore-job, so far as I can tell.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383More-2_zps2946c4b0.jpg)

Installed the rings, and pistons, then put the jugs back on. I feel like I am making progress towards something that will run one day! Or maybe just explode. Hopefully run though.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383More-5_zps1cd83613.jpg)
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Feb 20, 2013, 00:02:48
Chipping away.

Laced up my first rim (ever) today. I only had to redo it once. First time I had the pattern correct but the angles too shallow which left me with spokes that were too long. Whoops. Anyhow, new front rim. 18x2.15

I used PJ's idea for doming some washers to make the nipples fit in the MX rim nipple holes. Worked quite well. The washers are 7mm, with the smallest OD I could find. I just placed them on the nipples, used a 12mm socket (the inside of mine has a nice curve that matches the nipple fairly well) and gave it a few whacks with the hammer until they wouldn't bend anymore.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/20130219_165311_zps7b303bd1.jpg)
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/20130219_165328_zps29d9086a.jpg)
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/20130219_165400_zps9269607c.jpg)
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/20130219_170225_zps42d90af5.jpg)

Pretty simple.



(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/20130219_183900_zps93bac27c.jpg)

Its not trued yet. Can you fine tune the truing after the tire is one or is it best done before and rechecked afterwords? Never dealt with it before.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Feb 20, 2013, 06:29:59
Lacing up the rear rim and hub is not panning out quite as well. Despite the oversized nipple holes, the spoke angle seems to be a bit too steep which is putting a barely perceptible bend in a few of the spokes.

Also the spokes are somehow a bit too long even with the washers (I've checked the spoke pattern). This doesn't make any sense to me. Only possible cause I could think is that maybe the raised center of the rim is taller than the stock rim. Strange the front rim didn't have this problem though.

Anyhow, is it safe to just grind the sides of the hole to achieve the steeper spoke angle and stack on a second washer or would this be unstable and risk cracking the rim?
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: crazypj on Feb 20, 2013, 08:38:57
Brendon built his wheels last night, I'll true them for him in next day or so (I already started on front )
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Feb 24, 2013, 05:00:38
Took me a few days of cursing and running between my house and Home Depot but I finally got the rear wheel solidly put together and both of them trued. Rear wheel was having issues with spoke angle. I think the problem was a combination of the Excel rear rim being a good bit thicker than the other as well as the center being raised more than stock rim.

Spent a lot of time very carefully taking very small amounts of metal off in strategic locations with a router bit and a file. Then added a brass washer to each (hub is effectively closer to the rim because of the raised center and I didn't have enough spoke adjustment).
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB838WhiteFrame_zpsf28355f9.jpg)
That is before both washers were in place. had the keep the wheel together for fitting and checking as I was filing.

Anyhow, with the wheels assembled, I thought I'd see how the look is coming along.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB838WhiteFrame-3_zps755d73ad.jpg)

Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: edukaycheon on Feb 24, 2013, 05:18:49
Triple tree paint looks great
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: sourjon on Feb 24, 2013, 09:01:27
Love the cream color. Don't know about the yellow...have to see the whole thing but it has a nice stance to it.

John
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: crazypj on Feb 24, 2013, 09:01:30
Well,I'm liking the white and yellow  8)
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Feb 25, 2013, 03:54:47
Thanks, everyone.

Well, I am a bit worried about my valves.

I was cleaning up the head. Decided to shave a wee bit out of the exhaust ports. I remember reading somewhere (I assume PJ?) that they could stand to lose 1-2mm. I didn't take off much.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383Valves_zpsbaa9e37c.jpg)
Also decided to Molykote the top and bottom Camshaft journals. Should help to fill in a few of the shallow scores and add some slipperiness. Plus I had it sitting around from the pistons.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383Valves-2_zps121f3995.jpg)

Then I was cleaning up the valves when I noticed a few things. The Exhaust valves were marked L and R. At first I figured this was part of the seating... But then I noticed the heads on both had a very slight angle to the stem? This has got me a bit stressed out. Are they supposed to be that way? Or do I need to find some new exhaust valves?

I tried fitting them. As you can see in the first photo, there is a large gap. Obviously not going to seal at all. Turned roughly 180*, the gap goes away. Seems there is just a gap on the other side, though it is harder to tell. Input?

(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/d468ff02-0422-4ece-8952-cd195eb44c49_zpsb058f533.jpg)
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/e104cbe2-f8b6-40df-927f-61b0535df312_zpsb6e579c8.jpg)

Set up on the head you can see both exhaust valves have a slight lean, where as the intake valves stand straight up.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383Valves-5_zps37787bd3.jpg)

Help?

Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Mydlyfkryzis on Feb 25, 2013, 10:44:53
Properly functioning valves rotated slightly with every activation.  I have never heard of a leaning valve.

I would say the valves are bent, if your description is accurate.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: crazypj on Feb 25, 2013, 11:01:32
If you have a gap to seat when rotated, valves are bent and you need new ones.
You did clean up the steps in exhaust port 'bowl'?
 you can take out some more material in the 3:00~9:00 positions (ref pic)
 You also need to check guide wear/damage
Get down the sides of guide boss as well, the exhaust is the main restriction on 360 (btw, how are you getting a 383?)
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Finnigan on Feb 25, 2013, 13:34:14
Not really sure it would help but I can send you my spare set of 360 valves for you to reference.  If you end up needing them you can throw me a couple bucks (they need to be cleaned off though)
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Feb 25, 2013, 13:54:52
Played with them a bit more this morning. Definitely have a slight bend to them. Will need to check the guides more thoroughly after my FAA medical appointment.

Damn. Can anyone recommend a source for good valves and guides?
I see a few on ebay. Looks like 350 valves will work in a 360?

Finnigan- Thanks. I will keep you in mind. Do you need them or not mind parting with them?

PJ - I will go back and take out a bit more. I cleaned up the combustion chamber side all around the valves and plugs, as well as behind the valves (bowl?) so I don't think that is an issue with the seating. 383 is from 69.5mm pistons. (+.5 GS850).

Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Finnigan on Feb 25, 2013, 14:00:49
I JUST bought some valve guides from ebay

http://www.ebay.com/itm/HONDA-CB350-CL350-SL350-CB360-BRONZE-VALVE-GUIDES-WITH-VITON-SEALS-/230927566181?pt=Motorcycles_Parts_Accessories&hash=item35c45b0565&vxp=mtr

but you need to buy the special driver and then buy a reamer to kind of bore them out (they mushroom inside after getting driven in)

I pulled these valves off a spare head and don't need them.

If you need the valves and buy the guides I'll send you the driver and you can mail it back when you're done
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: crazypj on Feb 25, 2013, 18:10:26
Ah-ha, thought it was a 69.5 but wanted verification ;D
I wouldn't have bought guides until you know you need them, they are quite spendy, particularly when you need driver and reamer
I would get a reamer from China, takes a couple of weeks but it's massively cheaper than Honda one from Japan
 As for driver, any local machine shop could turn a pilot on a piece of bar, it doesn't need to be hardened if your only doing 4 guides
350 and 360 valves are the same, one of the few parts that swaps over
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Feb 25, 2013, 18:38:25
I found a pair of unused 69.5mm pistons with rings and pins as a set for a price I just couldn't pass up  ;D  Also, I was (at the time) having a hard time finding rings for the 69mm pistons I bought.



I was just playing with the guides in a pretty unscientific way. I don't have any means to actually measure them.
So, I just slid them in to feel for any wiggle. Intake sides don't seem to have any movement other than the proper in and out.

Exhaust valves are able to move very slightly around... enough to say to me that they do need replacement. I guess that means I might as well do all four and go bronze? (Finnigan)
Haven't purchased anything quite yet. I was originally planning on leaving all that alone for no. Projects do what they want, not what you have planned though.

Anyone used Stainless valves? Is there any advantage to carbon build up, longevity, weight or performance over stock?
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: crazypj on Feb 25, 2013, 18:47:57
No advantage unless you go 1mm oversize  ;)
 I still can't justify the $200+ it's going to cost me though (which is why I'm running stock ones  ;D )
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Feb 25, 2013, 18:55:16
1mm oversize on just the exhaust or both?

They guy who sells the seals also offers valves. Says he'll do oversize for the same price...
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Finnigan on Feb 25, 2013, 18:55:56
Haha I have .75 oversized rings if you want them, BRAND NEW
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Feb 25, 2013, 19:00:55
Haha I have .75 oversized rings if you want them, BRAND NEW

Valves or piston rings? My pistons are installed. 2.5mm oversized  ;)
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Finnigan on Feb 25, 2013, 19:49:55
oh haha i meant piston rings

It's crazy how much your thread is coinciding with my build, I just got my reamer delivered to me today (7mm high speed steel spiral flute style...i think) I'll try it out tonight on my new valve guides and see how it all works with standard valves
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: crazypj on Feb 25, 2013, 20:46:59
Actually, you only need 1mm OS intakes if your doing 1mm OS exhaust.
As the exhaust is the major restriction on 360, maybe 1mm OS would wake it up a bit more?
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Feb 26, 2013, 16:48:24
I emailed a guy in CA selling valve guides and making valves. He sells the guides with viton seals (which I already bought before I knew the valves were bad). He agreed to cut me a good deal combining the guides and valves with no seals.

Also, I can't find a single instance (on the net) of someone putting in 1mm oversized intake/exhaust valves on a CB360. I know someone, somewhere has to have done it, but its not been posted so far as I can tell. Anyone have a link or seen it up?

This lack of information sweetens the notion of trying it out. And then sharing the results. I may have to put this bike on a dyno when I get it tuned up. You are a (bad) influence, PJ.  :P

As far as I can tell, new seats aren't required. (any contradictions on that?) I just need to have them machined. Already talked to a local guy interesting in doing that.

Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Feb 26, 2013, 17:08:03
Also, can anyone recommend a good source for a full set of different jet sizes at a decent price?
I remembered, again, that since I moved from 5,000ft elevation to sea-level in addition to the engine rebuild I will need to start from jetting scratch.
Might as well just get a full set so I can play with them without having to order a bunch in sequence.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: crazypj on Feb 27, 2013, 03:20:11
Stock jetting will probably be close @5,000ft
 Brendon is now up to 125 secondary mains, but, we are at sea level (although it rained so much today it felt like we were below it  ;D )
 Sonrier fitted OS valves in his 378

http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=19672.475
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Feb 27, 2013, 07:32:41
Not too much rain here in Anchorage. Plenty of snow, though it got nice and warm today. I think a high of 37*f  :o

Tinkered around with a few items today since I can't finish the head. Put new bearings in the wheels. Took off my old rear sprocket and replaced it with a new one. The new swingarm requires a longer chain, so both sprockets are getting swapped.

I was running stock front and a 35T rear. New rear is back to the stock 34T. For the front I got a 17T and an 18T just to play with and see if it is too tame, or if it works well on the highway.

Anyhow, if you've ever wondered what the difference in diameter one tooth makes between the 34T and 35T at this size, its about 10mm
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383Valves-6_zpsfc06781f.jpg)


Spent a good couple of hours slowly opening up the exhaust ports and trying to get them roughly the same. I took more out of the sides, and shaved a lot of the excess off the guide protrusion, then quite a bit off the bottom curve opposite the guides (shortest pathway for the exhaust gases to take). Ran out of grinder stone bits so the one still needs to be cleaned up a wee bit.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383Valves-2-2_zps5024b4ae.jpg)
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383Valves-3-2_zps7fc2bf18.jpg)
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/CB383Valves-4-2_zps6e3c82f8.jpg)

Also took a fair amount out just behind the valve seat, but couldn't get a good angle for a photo.

Any feedback?

I've never ported a head before.

Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: crazypj on Feb 27, 2013, 14:23:28
You should have left most of the bottom of port in position and made it more 'D' shape (next time  ;D )
Opening up all the way around won't harm high rpm but you loose a little mid range (not that you had much to start with  ;D )
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Feb 27, 2013, 16:08:27
Ah! Thanks, PJ. Always trying to learn.

I was focusing on the sides at first but with the header studs in the way I was having a hard time getting as much material off as I wanted. I guess I got a little impatient and just went all the way around. Doh! (Homer Simpson voice with a palm to the forehead)

Hopefully with all said and done, it will still be a bit "better," if not ideal.

I am realizing sadly that today is my last day to tinker for a while. Back to work tomorrow until March 15, then off to HI for a week long photo job (other work, I guess), then to Utah for a friend's wedding. Hopefully back in Anchoragua by March 25. Damn. Nearly a straight month of motorcycle abstinence. CHEAP.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: 3DogNate on Feb 27, 2013, 16:21:22
Just found this thread for the first time.... VERY cool
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Finnigan on Feb 27, 2013, 16:24:33
Are you clearing out the junk or actually removing metal?  Thinking about doing this to mine since i havent assembled it fully yet.

Reason for doing this is better air flow?
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Feb 27, 2013, 17:59:53
Actually removing metal.

(Disclaimer to me sounding like I know what is going on: All of my knowledge of this is from reading others' experience and various forums, most of the concrete knowledge from PJ)

The exhaust ports are the main restriction on flow through the 360's engine. As you have probably read, a lot of unaware folks buy 360's and try to put Mikuni VM32s and such on them with resulting headaches. The Stock carbs and intake ports are already a bit large for the stock engine, so boring the cylinders out for bigger displacement helps bring those into a more optimal size for the flow.

I think this is opposite to the 350, which gets help from larger carbs and intake ports. I may be wrong on this, as I've never owned one, but I am pretty sure I've read about that (and it is probably where most people get the notion to do it on 360's).

So I ground off much of the protruding valve guide boss, and opened it up around the perimeter. I would say if you have the head off, definitely do this. Just do it better than I did and go for the D shape.  ;D

Should help exhaust flow more efficiently out of the combustion chamber. I am also making a straight through exhaust set up to help with this.

and thanks, 3DogNate!


Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Finnigan on Feb 27, 2013, 18:04:25
Good to know!

3dognate do you have any pics i can go off? 
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Feb 27, 2013, 18:10:33
Nate just made a comment saying this was a cool project. Not sure if he has porting info?

I would maybe ask PJ or Sonreir if they have any photos of the porting they have done. Or just look at mine, but take less off the bottom and more off the sides.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Finnigan on Feb 27, 2013, 18:21:28
The bottom being the lump where the guide is?

Are you just taking material from the mouth or the opening or all the way in?
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: crazypj on Feb 27, 2013, 20:30:00
I'll see if I can find pic online (maybe I took some of mine, can't remember)
from combustion chamber, bowl behind valve head fully smoothed out
(http://i91.photobucket.com/albums/k315/1crazypj/Honda%20CB360/CB360head.jpg)

Intake
(http://i91.photobucket.com/albums/k315/1crazypj/Honda%20CB360/CB360headport2.jpg)

Looking for exhaust pic, although if you can imagine exhaust flat where the picture is cut off, that's the 'D' shape, blend into the bowl area
OK, couldn't find a pic so I just took one of head I'm going to work on.
Line is a bit high but you get the idea, maybe 2/3~3/4 the way down
(http://i91.photobucket.com/albums/k315/1crazypj/Honda%20CB360/360exhaustport.jpg)
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Feb 27, 2013, 21:10:40
Those are great, PJ.

I'm thinking I may go back and work on mine a bit more. Bring that D section to the gasket. Or do you think that would be too much with what I have already done?
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: crazypj on Feb 27, 2013, 21:22:24
 restricting it with a steel 'D' gasket probably won't be a good idea, just open the top half to original squashed gasket size
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Mar 28, 2013, 02:57:17
Finally back in Anchorage. Went down to Hawai'i for a few days after work to meet a friend. Sitting in the cockpit jumpseat on a return flight from Honolulu to LA, I had an awesome conversation about classic motorbikes with the captain. Turns out he is very close friends with Eddie Lawson and invited me down to ride with them. Said he had a bunch of extra bikes. Sounds like a fun way to get killed.

Anyhow. On to bike progress.


-dropped off the tank and side covers to get paint. Really excited the see them finished, especially after meeting the guy who was recommended to me for the job. His work is fantastic.

- installed new valve guides. Really wasn't much too it. I heated the head to about 200* for a bit, and the old tapped right out. Swapped the circlips, and the new ones tapped right in.

-reamed the valve guides. (Thanks Finnigan)

-dropped the head and +1mm oversized valves off at Alaska Drag Bike to have them seated.


With the oversized valves, will I need to check piston-valve clearance? I did not skim the head at all.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Mar 28, 2013, 03:27:34
Also this

http://youtu.be/ojVsXB12zC8

reminds me of going to see Barnum and Bailey as a kid.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Mar 28, 2013, 22:16:40
Any input on checking piston to valve clearance with the OS valves? Eh?
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Sonreir on Mar 28, 2013, 22:57:35
Do it.
Use plastigauge or plasticine clay.  Torque everything to spec and rotate the crank (slowly!) two full rotations.  Take everything back apart and measure the clearance.  You'll want at least .020" between intake valve and piston and .040" between exhaust valve and piston.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Mar 28, 2013, 23:44:03
Thanks Sonreir. I'm going to head off and get some plasticine.

Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Mar 29, 2013, 07:02:55
Ok. I did two clay tests. I figured the first one was unreliable because I forgot to set valve clearances after bolting the head and valve cover up.

So I re-did the test. I guess I should have put the clay on thicker because only the exhaust valves touched. So I measured everything anyhow.



Left Exhaust Impression was about .058" with a possible minimum of .056" (may have just forces the caliper on that one).

Right Exhaust Impression hovered around .059" with a possible .055" minimum.

Left Intake valve didn't make an impression, nor did the Right Intake. So I just measured the clay I had laid down to see how thick it was.

Left side varied between .1" and .059", the Right side between .1" and .053".



Am I ok in thinking that since the Intake Valves didn't make an impression and the clay was 3 times thicker than .020" I am good to go or should I check with thicker clay to make sure they are not too far away (as in not opening all the way)?

I watching the valves through the spark plug hole and everything seemed to open as it should. Also watching the rockers. Probably turned the engine through 4 or 5 rotations while watching everything.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Sonreir on Mar 29, 2013, 11:06:23
Sounds like a successful check to me.  I'd run with it.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Mar 29, 2013, 22:14:10
Ok. I did an acentone test before the clay test and all valves sealed nicely.

So, I've got the engine loosely mounted in the frame and did a compression test.

Does anyone have an idea of what a cold, unseated compression ballpark figure should be? The book says to tests while the engine is at operating temps. And though not stated this is, obviously, with seated rings.

My right cylinder is easily pushing 151 psi, however the left is barely hitting 95-100psi after 3 checks. Any ideas? Or should I completely ignore this because the engine has not been run?
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Sonreir on Mar 29, 2013, 22:21:47
Assuming the valve clearances have been set, the two cylinders should both be fairly equal.  Cold compression test on my rebuilt 378 engine yielded 151 and 153, if I remember correctly.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Mar 29, 2013, 22:33:44
Disregard. I checked the valve clearances and did it again. Vastly different. Got 179 PSI Left and 172 PSI right.

Whew. I had myself scared.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Sonreir on Mar 30, 2013, 01:40:06
Close enough.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: canuk, eh on Apr 01, 2013, 17:53:07
awesome build here treesus, really inspiring. almost makes me want to crack open my 200t and get real down and dirty with it.

the only point i might make is that when i did a mechanics course(heavy duty  mind you), i had an engines instructor who was really into performance this kind of stuff. he always said if your going to polish, do it until you can see your own reflection in the metal. his suggestion was to get some kind of buffing tool that would fit on the end of your drill and fit snug into your ports, then buff until your wife divorces you  ;D. i have never tried it myself, so i cant say how much it will do, but it always seemed like it couldn't hurt as long as you dont touch your valve guides/mating surface too much.

again, amazing stuff here, your a real inspiration for the gear-heads!
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Sonreir on Apr 01, 2013, 17:58:14
Polishing ports is largely a waste of time.  Smoothing them is definitely advantageous, but polishing is a bunch of effort with zero reward.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Apr 11, 2013, 01:55:56
Jets

I am about to put in an order for a set of jets. Not completely sure of a range to start with so any input would help from those of you who've gone down this road.


quick reference list of engine mods and info that matter for this:

I am at sea level in a cold area. Anchorage, Alaska.

Bored to 69.5mm pistions.
K&N Filters
1mm Oversized Intake/Exhaust Valves
Ported Exhaust channels
(net yet completed) custom headers and straight through pipes - will just be running open headers initially until I build my pipes and mufflers.



So I was thinking of buying a set of 120, 122, 125s. Does this seem like a good place to start or far off? Pretty sure I have 110's in there now.

I also have PJ's modified air corrector.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Sonreir on Apr 11, 2013, 11:57:58
On the 360 engines, the exhaust will be one of the most important determining factors in jetting.

For short exhausts, that end around the foot pegs, you'll want to go +10 over stock (Strangely enough, you lose power, but still require more fuel.  This exhaust length is not recommended).

If you're going two-into-one, +5 on the secondary main is a good place to start.

Longer exhausts will make the engine come alive right around the 7,000 RPM mark.  I recommend a total exhaust length of between five and six feet, assuming you keep the stock diameters.

My 360 is bored out to 378cc, I'm running +1mm on the intake and exhaust valves, I've shaved the head for extra compression, I'm running a hot cam, AND I have open intakes with velocity stacks.  Even with all that, I'm on +5 on the jetting (Running 115 secondary mains) and the bike is running well (at 200ft above sea level).

Short version:  Keep your stock jetting, save your money, only buy jets once you've figured out if you need them.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: crazypj on Apr 11, 2013, 14:10:48
If you run too big a head pipe you also need a lot richer secondary jetting.
Brendon is running 125 secondary mains and plugs are just about perfect
Seems stock INNER pipe diameter is correct (about 1-1/8"ID, 1-1/4" OD)
If you use 1-1/2" pipe and it's too short overall, your going to go crazy trying to jet

 Did I do the complete carbs or was it just new air correctors?
I stopped making them as carbs need some extra mods to various circuits, air correctors help mid range a lot but things can be 'better' I was still experimenting when I first made them (about 3+ yrs ago)
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on Apr 12, 2013, 03:25:55
Thanks to both of you for the input. I will wait on the jets.

PJ- Just the air correcctors. I got them from you probably about 1-1/2 years ago or more. If you are interested, once I get the bike running I would like to send you my carbs.

My plan for the exhaust is new headers and making my own straight through mufflers. They will extend a tad passed the rear axle (which is 1.5" further back than stock). Should be within and inch or so of the stock overall length.

Will 1.5" diameter pipe work if the overall length is close to stock or will it will be too big? I guess the problem there would be the gases slowing down too much?

I am wondering about issues with mounting new headers to the head with a 1/4" smaller outer diameter pipe with the original mounts.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: crazypj on Apr 12, 2013, 13:26:10
You should be fine with the longer exhaust.
You've probably seen the pictures of the one I made, it's about 4"~6" longer than stock
 No problem about carbs when your ready
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Sonreir on Apr 12, 2013, 13:29:49
Long exhausts, baby:
(https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/521467_10151001039145159_1346676056_n.jpg)

Plus... they sound good:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FmYW7GBX4y8
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Mydlyfkryzis on Apr 12, 2013, 20:44:35
Sonreir, I like the sound of your exhaust. Is that the MAC 2 into 2, or a stock head pipes and aftermarket mufflers?

I've been thinking of going to the MAC 2 into 2, but would like to hear it first, and if it sounds close to what you have, it is exactly what I want.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: crazypj on Apr 12, 2013, 20:48:04
Looks like stock head pipes with a 'kick up' extension then aftermarket silencers (although muffler is probably a better description  ;) )
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Mydlyfkryzis on Apr 12, 2013, 21:18:56
Yeah. I haven't found any reasonably priced head pipes in reasonable condition. The MAC 2 into 2 look snice, but I suspect it will sound similar to my 2 into 1 MAC system....A little too loud...Sonreir system is a little loud, but it has a nice throaty rumble to it...

I am not is a rush, so I will keep looking. The aftermarket universal silencer choice is much larger then the CB360 specific set.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Sonreir on Apr 12, 2013, 21:29:15
I'm running the stock CB headers with a 35 upswept adapter, mated to these:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Dunstall-Reverse-Cone-Motorcycle-Muffler-Chrome-Triumph-/150629696463#vi-content

Bear in mind that you won't get the same sound unless you do a bit of work though.  The hot cam and open intakes definitely changes the audio track.  ;)
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on May 05, 2013, 02:08:24
Didn't get to work on the bike at all last month. My tank and side covers were supposed to be ready when I got back from work on the 15th, but the guy painting them hadn't been able to even start on them yet. Lot of car show work and such.

Anyhow, my gal was visiting Anchorage from SLC so it was probably best to not have extra temptation to disappear into the workshop, so to speak. Went -10*F camping at Denali instead.



Exhaust System Questions, continued-

So, 1.25" headers are ideal for performance, but SS tubing of that is less abundant, flange issues could arise, and.... I don't think I would like the look of extra skinny headers. Vain, but honest.

Idea. I am going to buy bends and tubes to make 1.5" headers.
I did however find 1.25" perforated SS tubing that I can taper down to inside the mufflers I am building. I can make the transition smooth by getting SS cones.
Or would it just be better to stay at 1.5" the entire length?     The stock mufflers use something small between the baffles- Maybe 3/4"?

Sonreir - Any idea what the total stock exhaust length is? I'm curious where it falls in the 5-6 foot ideal concept. I'd measure but I'm at work again till the 16th.


Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Sonreir on May 05, 2013, 02:09:54
I'm not sure, sorry.  I don't have a stock exhaust system left in the shop anymore.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on May 06, 2013, 02:02:44
Any of you who have made your own headers, how did you make the lip on the head side for clamping them down? 

I was thinking of possibly just make a series of small cuts in tabs which I could then bend outward and fill with welding... wouldn't be pretty but it would probably work.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Sonreir on May 06, 2013, 02:04:26
You can also use a couple of pipes with varying inside and outside diameters.  Cut small sections and slip them inside one another.  You end up with a thick stack that can be welded.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on May 18, 2013, 06:12:51
Electrical-

Well I got back to Anchorage. My tank and side covers are STILL not done. I had wanted to wait till I have my top triple clamp (he is using it for color matching) to do much of the electrical nonsense on accounts of a large portion of the wiring being in the handle bars. Decided not to wait. I am keeping the drag bars for now.

So, all of my wiring is now back together. I blew a few fuses getting there but everything works, including a number of items that weren't working when I took the bike apart. Namely the starter (no big deal as I rarely used it) and the turn signals.  Electrical systems have always been a lot of magic and wizardry to me. I have a pretty competent basic understanding, but am constantly tricked by gremlins.

A bit of back info- I had previously thought I had a bad turn signal relay because when the switch was thrown to L or R, they would blink once, or twice, three times on a good day, then just stay lit. But the relay tested good. I fooled with it for a long while every time I worked on my bike and couldn't find the problem until today.

The problem was my headlight mounts. I had swapped out the old one for a cheap black set of headlight ears and put everything back together exactly as before. Well, the new mounts were powder coated. Since the old set up gounds to the headlight bolts and then through the mounting frame, I had effectively broken the ground path without knowing. Headlight still worked since it is fully wired, and I think the turn signals were partially grounded somehow through that system. Enough to work almost, but not really. I thought it funny. I never would have guess my headlight mount would have caused and entire system not to work.


Exhaust-

Must be Christmas today, as it has been snowing here and I got a box of goodies. Here lies the raw makings of my mufflers and headers. The bends and packing aren't shown.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/20130517_222705_zps0753b484.jpg) (http://s88.photobucket.com/user/treeweeSD/media/CB383%20Project/20130517_222705_zps0753b484.jpg.html)

I couldn't find any ready-made exhaust that I felt would finish off the bike properly. Well, I figured I've come too far to half-ass anything now. Guess we'll see if I am capable of making headers and mufflers. What I have in my mind is pretty killer. Getting it into the realm of real world items is the trick.

Cutting tubes accurately was my first hurdle. Using a hose clamps works really well as a guide for 90* cuts. I'll get pictures of the muffler body tomorrow.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/20130517_235929_zps028a24f1.jpg) (http://s88.photobucket.com/user/treeweeSD/media/CB383%20Project/20130517_235929_zps028a24f1.jpg.html)

Not sure how I am going to cut the cones to size....
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on May 19, 2013, 00:56:52
More muffler progress.


Proof that with enough patience, accurate-enough cuts for tig welding can be made with a hand saw and sand paper.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/12021af4-e486-4da9-b4e1-cc541249c012_zps356da5bf.jpg) (http://s88.photobucket.com/user/treeweeSD/media/CB383%20Project/12021af4-e486-4da9-b4e1-cc541249c012_zps356da5bf.jpg.html)


This is just the tip. Piece on the left slips over the piece on the right, which is a transition from the 1.5" baffle to the 2" outlet that I wanted for looks.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/20130518_193204_zps2215e20d.jpg) (http://s88.photobucket.com/user/treeweeSD/media/CB383%20Project/20130518_193204_zps2215e20d.jpg.html)

Tip on the body.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/20130518_193531_zps480fd142.jpg) (http://s88.photobucket.com/user/treeweeSD/media/CB383%20Project/20130518_193531_zps480fd142.jpg.html)

Looking into the tip towards the baffle.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/20130518_193436_zpsed808ffb.jpg) (http://s88.photobucket.com/user/treeweeSD/media/CB383%20Project/20130518_193436_zpsed808ffb.jpg.html)


Nothing is welded yet. I am going to get all the pieces ready and probably take them to a competent tig welder. I don't think my mig welding would really do the whole thing justice...
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Treesus on May 19, 2013, 01:01:22
Also, to make life easier I make a template for the other side. Should speed up fitment.
(http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k162/treeweeSD/CB383%20Project/20130518_193641_zps2eaee1d2.jpg) (http://s88.photobucket.com/user/treeweeSD/media/CB383%20Project/20130518_193641_zps2eaee1d2.jpg.html)
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Finnigan on Aug 13, 2013, 14:43:57
Where you at?!
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: timberwolffxdl on Jan 14, 2014, 13:12:49
bumping this up in hopes there are updates...
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: behrboy on Jan 25, 2014, 17:34:50
liked the flyby vid.
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: honda53rider on Jan 26, 2014, 19:12:04
Grate build! I would love to take one of my little bikes (xs400, SL350) on a long trip like you have!
Title: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: Ply318ci on Mar 25, 2014, 01:41:34
Bump please.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: '74 CB383 (CB360) - a Mighty Mouse adventure bike
Post by: DRTardo on Nov 18, 2017, 12:14:26
I know this thread has been down a long time, but the Photobucket BS is such a drag and I am REALLY interested in the content.

If the OP is still around, any chance you could relink images?... Please...