DO THE TON

Blood Sweat Tears and Grease => Projects => Cafe Racers => Topic started by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 04, 2014, 13:12:34

Title: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 04, 2014, 13:12:34
Hi All  :D

I love motorcycles. This is my 4th one and I decided it was time to take on the challenge of rebuilding a bike myself. I am not a mechanic but can be resourceful when I need to be. I love learning. I love wrenching. I respect wisdom. This is why I am posting here, to learn from others, get advice and guidance along the way. I work on a computer from Monday to Friday but just can't wait for Saturday's wrench!  8)

Here's what I'm dealing with:
It's a 1973 CB350G (the one with the front disc brake). I purchased the bike for more than I would like to admit ($1500) and it was not running ( I know, I know..). I justified the price because CB350's are in demand in the area I live in and there are not many around, especially so close to where I live. Also, he gave me a box of parts with it. I was happy. It had been buried deep in his garage for approx 3 years and was starting to get some surface rust and a whole lot of cobwebs. It has approx 33,000 miles (seems a lot but I intend to rebuild the engine), battery was dead, 3 yr old gas in the tank with rust inside the tank, engine turned over, brakes not ceased, tyres almost brand new. I came to the conclusion that the bike was well maintained and decided to go for it.

What I intend to do:
- dismantle entire bike
- recondition all aluminum to mirror shine
- rebuild engine with upgrades
- fresh PC on frame and select parts
- upgraded rims, spokes and tyres
- upgraded front brake, possibly dual disc??
- upgraded suspension in front and rear, stock forks rebuilt, possible inverted forks??
- custom seat, headlight, running/brake light
- clip on bars, upgraded front controls
- brand new wiring harness with Motogadet M-unit & components
- upgraded battery
- redesigned and repainted tank
- upgraded chain and sprockets
- possible upgrade to electronic ignition system
- upgraded rear sets

I'll post more of where I'm currently tomorrow and some pics of the inspiration I have been cultivating. Thanks and sorry again for such a long post, they will be short and more concise in the future.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 04, 2014, 13:40:39
Here is some inspiration pics for now that I have gathered from just doing a little research online. I don't know if I want to go with clip-ons or clubman style. I don't think I will go with a cafe style seat but rather a more bobber style with the end kicked up slightly so it's not like a diving board.

Build progress pics/video to come. In the meantime does anyone have any advice for cleaning/shining the aluminum parts?
I would like the side covers to be nice and clean like BOTs bike (black & orange 350 below).

Thanks!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: MotoMadness on Dec 04, 2014, 15:23:22
We just finished up one.  Let us know if you have any questions or need anything.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: MotoMadness on Dec 04, 2014, 15:28:56
(http://www.moto-madness.com/CB350/CB350%20Full%20HR.JPG)
(http://www.moto-madness.com/CB350/CB350 Intake HR.JPG)

(http://www.moto-madness.com/CB350/CB350%20Rearend%202%20HR.JPG)
(http://www.moto-madness.com/CB350/CB350%20Exhaust%20HR.JPG)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Tim on Dec 04, 2014, 15:41:02
For the side covers, it's just remove them and polish.

BTW I'm in Toronto too.  Would like to see some more pics of the rack / bags that seem to be on the bike from the photos.  I'd be interested in buying them from you if you're selling.

tim@dotheton.com
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 04, 2014, 16:19:25
We just finished up one.  Let us know if you have any questions or need anything.
Wow it looks awesome man, great job! Thanks for offering up your help, I would for sure love to hear your input when I post some questions. I will hit you up when I get stuck. Off the bat though I know there are 2 common problems with this engine that people have since resolved or figured out ways to combat them/replaced with upgraded parts, I know one has to do with thew Cam chain tensioner or the rollers or something? What is the other common problem with the 350? I read it a while ago but have since forgot where I read it.

Thanks and again great job on the bike, thanks for sharing!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 04, 2014, 16:21:45
For the side covers, it's just remove them and polish.

BTW I'm in Toronto too.  Would like to see some more pics of the rack / bags that seem to be on the bike from the photos.  I'd be interested in buying them from you if you're selling.

tim@dotheton.com

Tim, I sent you an email buddy! Thanks for getting in touch. Part pics coming soon, talk soon.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 10, 2014, 23:18:54
Back to the progress! My first teardown session went pretty smoothly. I am learning a lot as I go and just taking my time with it. Again, if you see or read about me doing anything out of the ordinary I would love to hear your feedback. I want to learn as much as possible.

Please excuse the mess in the background of the pictures and video. It's not my house and I don't live there but if it were up to me, 90% of the stuff would be in the junk yard! I'm working with what I have and things are getting done. I plan to organize more over the holidays.

I will be documenting this entire process on YouTube. I plan to even visit/interview some mechanics/builders/fellow riders for input down the road so it should be an interesting series to learn from and I hope you subscribe and follow along with me.

Here is episode 1 of my project:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gcl8_XqvzHc

Here are some pics:

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Toxic Motorwerks on Dec 11, 2014, 20:43:40
Great start and great videos. Looking forward to more.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: carnivorous chicken on Dec 11, 2014, 23:18:54
Some interesting stuff, but I'd avoid going for velocity stacks on a street bike, compounded by no rear inner fender as seen in some of those photos. And run a front fender or a brace (unless you want to look at it and not ride it). Just my 2 cents worth...
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 12, 2014, 00:22:08
Great start and great videos. Looking forward to more.

Cheers! Plenty more on the way!  :D


Some interesting stuff, but I'd avoid going for velocity stacks on a street bike, compounded by no rear inner fender as seen in some of those photos. And run a front fender or a brace (unless you want to look at it and not ride it). Just my 2 cents worth...


Thanks Carnivorous, I appreciate the input. Those are photos of another build posted here by different user. Although a cool bike, it was not part of my original inspiration.

Can you explain to me what the deal is with velocity stacks? Mainly for racing or what? Maximum air intake? They look neat, I just don't know much about them.

Thanks again!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 12, 2014, 00:44:26
For my second session, I removed the tank, carbs, exhaust, headlight and the electrical harness. The tank is very rusted inside and will need a good wash. In my research I found that vinegar/water and some loose ball bearings or small nuts & bolts with a hefty shake and left for 24hrs is a good cheap way to clean out most of the rust from inside the tank. Can anyone attest? Have any better ideas or recommended products?

While removing the tank I spilled a bunch of gas out of that cross flow tube that's under the tank. Is this just to distribute the gas evenly in the tank? If not what is that for? What if you need to remove your tank on the road and it is full of gas, is there any way of removing the tank without spilling when detaching that cross flow tube or is this normal? The gas sat in the tank for 3 years, so it was pretty smelly. I got a good buzz emptying it though haha..

While I was taking out the harness I was making notes as to where things came and went. I have to admit I a little intimidated before exploring it, but after I took it all apart I realized there's really nothing to it at all and am looking forward to tackling the wiring myself when it comes to it.

Here's the second installment of my Youtube series for the build:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1XSK5_KaGS8





Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: carnivorous chicken on Dec 12, 2014, 11:20:23
Cheers! Plenty more on the way!  :D


Thanks Carnivorous, I appreciate the input. Those are photos of another build posted here by different user. Although a cool bike, it was not part of my original inspiration.

Can you explain to me what the deal is with velocity stacks? Mainly for racing or what? Maximum air intake? They look neat, I just don't know much about them.

Thanks again!

Yep, I saw someone else post 'em, but thought a word of caution might be in order anyway. To be honest, I build and ride bikes for the street so my racing expertise is pretty limited -- anyone else is free to chime in here. The danger with velocity stacks on a street bike is that without filters all kinds of crap goes through your carbs and into your engine and increases wear and the chance for failure (and obviously this is compounded by no inner rear fender). They can increase performance, but my understanding is not by much (although when racing, every little bit counts, and you're on a track that doesn't have much road debris and dirt, but bits of tire). And racing bikes go through frequent tear downs and rebuilds. Pods work for some bikes better than others, and stock airboxes are frequently the easiest and best thing to keep a bike running reliably. You're bike has CV carbs, and if you're going to run 'em you're going to want to keep stock air filters. Some folks switch out the carbs for Mikuni racing carbs and run pods, but I've convinced people to go back to stock because they didn't know what they were doing and the stock setup is easier to dial in. On a side note, you'll want to make sure the diaphragms in those carbs aren't ripped -- that's a frequent problem and you won't get your bike to run properly if they are.  A lot of people jump in and see bikes with velocity stacks and assume that's what they've got to do, but like I said, it's not a good idea. And a fork brace or front fender is pretty important too; without it forks can twist under pressure.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: pacomotorstuff on Dec 12, 2014, 12:01:41
Seasons Greetings,
Good to see another Canadian bike build - after all, DTT started in Canada!
+1 to the fork brace, or at least keep the stock fender mini brace, as those old 33mm forks are not particularly stiff or rigid.
- 1 to velocity stacks on the street unless you like to rebuild your top end on a frequent basis (but look at better flowing filters).
I know a lot of guys like the no rear fender look, but try to get at least a little fender in there to stop crud and water from firing into the back of the motor (maybe paint it flat black or something to blend in).  You're riding around Toronto - think about how changeable our weather is.
Like Tim said in a post awhile back, build the bike you want to build and don't worry about the "critics" - the mantras being, make it safe and reliable, enjoy the (fabrication) journey but keep focused on the destination (finish the damned thing).
BTW, love to borrow your rear fender sometime.  I want to build a mould to make a fiberglass version, to match up with the 'glass front fender I already build.  Your fender will come back a lot shinier than in the photo and still completely usable if you wish to.  Can give you a good discount on one of the finished fenders as well - a lot lighter and far easier to modify and / or paint than the stocker.
Have fun with your build.
Pat Cowan,
Vintage Motorcycle Fiberglass / Pacomotorstuff
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: brad black on Dec 13, 2014, 07:23:25
velocity stacks are fine.  they can add performance across the whole rpm range on lots of things.  unfitered velocity stacks, or ones with little gauze filters in them are not so good on road bikes.  all modern bikes have them, but you can't see them because they're hidden in the airbox.

how about a perspex airbox, where you can see the stacks?
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 13, 2014, 20:36:29
carnivorous, pacomotorstuff, brad black.. Thanks for your input and shedding light on the situation. I will heed all warnings and advice, it is all really helpful. I've seen a few guys add that back fender/blocker for the rear tire and figured it was to protect the carbs/filters so thanks for confirming that. I didn't have plans to build one for my bike but I do now :D I definitely agree with the front fender, I was warned about that early.


I know a lot of guys like the no rear fender look, but try to get at least a little fender in there to stop crud and water from firing into the back of the motor (maybe paint it flat black or something to blend in).  You're riding around Toronto - think about how changeable our weather is.
Like Tim said in a post awhile back, build the bike you want to build and don't worry about the "critics" - the mantras being, make it safe and reliable, enjoy the (fabrication) journey but keep focused on the destination (finish the damned thing).
BTW, love to borrow your rear fender sometime.  I want to build a mould to make a fiberglass version, to match up with the 'glass front fender I already build.  Your fender will come back a lot shinier than in the photo and still completely usable if you wish to.  Can give you a good discount on one of the finished fenders as well - a lot lighter and far easier to modify and / or paint than the stocker....



great advice man and ya, you can borrow the fender for sure. Send me a private msg or an email and we'll sort out the details.

Thanks again guys.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Tim on Dec 14, 2014, 15:05:56
So you going to sell me that rear rack or what? :). Seriously would like to buy it as it matches my saddle bags.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 14, 2014, 23:24:06
For my 3rd session, I drained the oil, dismantled the front controls and loosened my crankcase covers while the engine was bolted to the frame. I got a little ahead of myself and did not research enough about the oil filter on these bikes. I went looking for a disposable oil filter and only realized there was one built into the engine, staring me in the face after I had done some research and looked at the manual. Good lesson to be learned there.. RTFM... every time. Chalk that one up to an eager rookie mistake.

I ran into a few stripped bolts on the left side of the crankcase, so I could not get to the sprocket to remove it. I've already figured that I am going to drill into them with an 8mm drill bit. That way I can get to the sprocket and remove it so I can move on with the rear wheel. I do not have a chain breaking tool, so it's my only option for now.

No more major surprises with this wrench sesh, was cool poking through the front controls figuring out how they work. I also enjoyed peeking behind some of the crankcase covers at the clutch, stator and what I know now to be the oil filter. I'm looking forward to getting the rear wheel off so I can move on with the teardown.

I removed the old gas from the float bowls in the carbs and saw that they were in pretty great shape when I looked inside. I cleaned them up and sprayed a little WD40 in the bowls, put them back together and sealed them in a ziplock bag for storage.

Check it out:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j8ipiD_a2zI

Here are some pics:


Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Dec 15, 2014, 01:22:29
I like what you're doing. You got a good spirit about it, mate.

1. Use PB Blast as a penetrant if you're buying an aerosol. Nothing else! For the really tough stuff like pistons and heavy studs, ATF or ATF thinned with acetone will work. Stuck valves is a different story. It involves making a spark plug into a grease nipple and pumping so much grease into it that it creeps through the valve guides. At least you don't have to take the top off to do it, though.

2. Why do you need a chain breaker? This has a chain with a small clip you remove to split it. The only tool you need is pliers.

3. Don't drill into the case! Just buy an Easy-out bolt extractor. It is a sort of drill bit with reversed threads, so when you are turning anti-clockwise, the threads are digging into the bolt to extract it. Read what size you will need to drill and how deep and for which size extractor. Google.

4. The sad thing is that you've gone too far, but the good news is it's not to hard to put everything back for one important first step; MAKE SURE IT TURNS AND RUNS. I know it sounds like a lot of work, but I can usually take something that's been sitting for a decade and make it run within a day or two, assuming parts are on hand. At least then you can better judge what you need and, more importantly, what you don't.

You took the side cover off. Clean the oil slinger spotless, you don't have to remove it to do so. Make sure the pump screen is clean and not broken or clogged. Clean it. Now put the cover back bone dry with maybe a hair-thin layer of gasket maker, just to avoid a mess and constantly topping it up with oil.

Put oil on, attach a SAFE external test tank for petrol, put the carbs back on without those filters, they're cardboard by now. It's ok to start just for now without a filter, just make sure nothing can get sucked in. Dust is actually gritty and can cause damage inside.

Crack the head bolts one-half turn from the outside inward in a cross pattern, then torque them to spec from the inside ones to the outside ones, working in a cross pattern.

Set your cam-chain tension of you have a manual one. The manual one will have a bolt on the top of the housing.

Set valve clearances.

Set the ignition timing as best ya can after you check that you have spark.

With new plugs, oil, and petrol, give it a go.

Check compression. These will idle with as low as 145psi but you want more than 155, 160 is recommended minimum. The cylinder pressure shouldn't be more than about 5-10psi difference between the two.

Also, GET A MANUAL!!! It is your bible. Check online for anything you're not certain about. Any terms, techniques, or inconsistencies can be cross checked. Don't make a move without consulting SOMETHING.

Watching this build. Like the vids.

Edit:

Just ready over a post again.

The line under the fuel tank is the crossover. It ensures you can use the petrol at the bottom of the tank opposite the petcock side. Some Triumph riders are familiar with tipping their bike to get that last drop of fuel over to the reserve-tap side.

As for disconnecting, there are quick-disconnect solutions that won't spill a drop. Google.

For the rust, do as you're doing now to remove the large rust. Wash it a few times and then fill it to the top with Metal Rescue or Evapo-rust. Glorious stuff. Once you wash it out, if you don't immediately coat it, use some 2-stroke oil mixed with petrol to slosh around and coat the inside, or it will immediately rust. Pics attached of my SL100 in progress. The line is where the Evapo-rust was filled to. I only had a gallon on hand, but when I go over it again it will be evenly cleaned and coated.
Title: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Dec 15, 2014, 01:29:45
Use the impact driver.
If you start to wrestle with a bolt at all, STOP and hit it with the impact before things get very bad. In fact, it might even handle the stripped heads pictured.

Don't be too worries about the order of the bolts in the covers. You will find these listed in a parts fiche such as those on CMSNL.com. All of the bolts are the same on the clutch cover except the two holes with the locating dowels, which are longer.

Here's an SL that say for 15 years and was running the next day! Smoked a little at first but I guess the rings freed up with some ATF. Cleaned and sold 4 days later. Never needed to split the motor! Don't ask about the tank, it's somebody else's hero's journey now. ;D
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 15, 2014, 16:45:50
Redliner, awesome stuff man! Thanks so much for the advice/guidance, really appreciate it. There are some upgrades I want to do to the engine so it will be worked on no matter what, with the help of a professional. It's a whole learning experience for me so I really wanted to get my hands into everything. I'm learning so much and don't want to stop!

Glad you're on board as you will no doubt be of help again.. Cheers!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Dec 15, 2014, 16:54:36
As far as this board goes, the true blue veterans are going to be racers like Teazer and kopcicle. If there's anything you're scratching you're head over as far as which performance parts mingle well, that would be my top resource. bradj doesn't Honda, not at all, but he at least knows as much about four strokes in general to be of considerable help as well.

I'll leave it at this, before you upgrade a part, you have to ask if that is the bottle neck. You can have the hottest cam gracing this earth, but it will simply starve if the intake and exhaust won't support it.

You may also talk to Texasstar. He managed to take a 200cc bucket racer up to 99mph, at least last I heard, and that was his first build!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 15, 2014, 17:08:56
I totally hear what you are saying about the upgrades, it makes perfect sense.

Thanks for those resources, they will most certainly come in handy.. I appreciate it man!!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 16, 2014, 13:04:27
Can anyone please advise on these types of springs/shocks for the front forks? I really like the way they look and would like to do something similar with my build. I'm not sure what to look for or what size, etc to buy.

Any help would be appreciated, thanks!

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Dec 16, 2014, 13:38:25
That is a CL fork. The CL does not use an internal spring. What you see is the only means of suspension for the CL. I think it's supposed to allow for more cushion over the entire distance of travel compared to the tightly coiled CB springs, which are stiffer.

Since you want performance, consider swapping a front end with larger forks. The later model CB450 has larger forks and I believe swap right over with the entire tree. Look into that.

I've never worked on a CB/CL 350 that didn't have slightly tweaked forks. You'll notice when you do a wheel alignment that it just won't straighten out. I had to bend both of my forks and replace a bent tree. 33mm is just too damn small.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 16, 2014, 14:08:44
That is a CL fork. The CL does not use an internal spring. What you see is the only means of suspension for the CL. I think it's supposed to allow for more cushion over the entire distance of travel compared to the tightly coiled CB springs, which are stiffer.

Since you want performance, consider swapping a front end with larger forks. The later model CB450 has larger forks and I believe swap right over with the entire tree. Look into that.


Thanks Redliner!

Hmm ok so the external springs are a bit softer? I guess that's not as good as the suspension on there now, say if I were to add some progressive springs to the forks I currently have? Would you recommend that option more?
Title: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Dec 16, 2014, 14:16:32
You're stock springs are progressive. They get tighter on one end. ;D

How fast do you plan to go? How will you use the bike? Is form more important than function?

On a side note, I'll warn you now not to waste your money on VM30 or VM32 carbs. That seems to be a reflexive action to anybody trying to cafe one of these for the first time and it's a wrong one. More on that later.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: CALfeRacer on Dec 16, 2014, 15:50:22

On a side note, I'll warn you now not to waste your money on VM30 or VM32 carbs. That seems to be a reflexive action to anybody trying to cafe one of these for the first time and it's a wrong one. More on that later.
I'm interested to know why not to put VM30s on. I'm in the planning stage of a CB350 that doesn't have carbs and was considering going with VMs, either in 28 or 30.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 16, 2014, 15:52:38
You're stock springs are progressive. They get tighter on one end. ;D

How fast do you plan to go? How will you use the bike? Is form more important than function?

Function is probably the most important.. Bike will be used for leisure/semi daily rider. I'd like it to be a bit faster than stock but that being said, I'm not taking it on any tracks. Just want it fun & fast! 
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 16, 2014, 15:53:44
I'm interested to know why not to put VM30s on. I'm in the planning stage of a CB350 that doesn't have carbs and was considering going with VMs, either in 28 or 30.

Quite intrigued also as I've heard or and seen a lot of builds using these carbs and was fully planing on implementing them.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Dec 16, 2014, 16:21:25
Considering the price that DCC lists a set of 32's for, it's a wonder nobody considers their options in the first place.

The idea is more carb means more air means more power. That ain't so when the valve guide bosses take up the whole damn port. There are some bottlenecks in the 350 and it ain't necessarily the stock carb.

Smaller carbs offer more take off power. I run VM26's that I pulled off of a Yamaha Banshee 2-stroke 350cc quad with stock motor and ports. Cost me $100. Once you run this setup, you'll wonder why Honda didn't choose the same. I'm told 28mm would be better for the top end, WOT, but I've never seen any sound advice for anything larger when it comes to slide carbs.

Talk to CrazyPJ about carbs. He likes the Honda twins and has a lot of experience here.

As for the suspension, if you're not hooning it up (often) then those CL forks may work for you. Just know they're really springy and dive on braking.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 17, 2014, 08:06:56
Cheers Redliner! The info is really helpful. I think I may just stick with the springs I currently have, but will do a bit more research. I will also look into the whole carb thing when it comes to it, not there yet though. Really appreciate your input though  8)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 17, 2014, 08:09:45
So for my 4th session I wanted to tackle those striped bolts on the crank case cover and remove the sprocket, chain, rear wheel, swing arm and shocks. After talking it over with my buddy Rob, an experienced bike builder who runs Bullit Customs Cycles, I felt pretty confident that this was the way to go. Luckily my dad (aka "Crazy Joe") has like every tool imaginable, so he knew exactly what I needed when I told him what was going on. He busts out an 8mm metal drill bit and I go to town on the bolts.. Eats through them with no problems and I get the cover off. Didn't even need vice grips when I got the cover off, which is a bit perplexing, just loosened the studs with my fingers. I know Redliner said not to drill into the case but it was my only option at that point. Damage to the case was very very minimal.. plus I kind of like the battle scars.

The chain and rear wheel assembly came off with no problems at all, same with the shocks and swing arm. I am actually feeling really good about this tear down. I never realized how amazing I would feel after going through the bike like this and I seriously recommend it to those of you who are unfamiliar with their bikes or just don't feel comfortable. Just get yourself a manual and take something apart! I seriously feel like I am really understanding the vehicle so much more the further I get into this.. it's a great feeling.

Here's the video if you're interested to see how it all went:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jojdc3IRBEE

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Dec 17, 2014, 09:12:09
The reason the bolt came out with your finger is that tension is applied by the bolt head.

Bolts are held in place by their elasticity. When you spin it clockwise, the threads pull the bolt in, obviously. Once the head reaches the surface, the bolt will stretch as you turn it since the head is holding it back.

Sometimes a bolt will lose elasticity with time and use.

Get a torque wrench and check all of the applicable bolts are torqued to spec. That axle nut is usually 65 ft/lbs or more and the rear axle about the same. Very important.

Replace the swing arm bushings with brass. They're a slight interference fit, so you'll need to freeze the brass and heat the swingarm and press the two together, preferably without just beating it in.

I think I saw a ball in your clutch throw-out lever, is this correct? If so, keep track of this and make sure it's still round.
I also see that your clutch rod has a ball-end. You do not need this ball if you have this ball end. In my experience you won't be able to properly adjust the clutch if you have it and don't need it, or need it and don't have it. Did you ever kick the bike over to feel compression with the ball fitted?

As for wheels, I don't believe you'll comfortably fit more than a 1.85" rim on the front with a 3.00" tyre. 2.15" on the rear with a 90 or 100mm with 90% profile would be the max. I'd prefer a 90 back there. If the rubber is too wide, you lose sidewall structure.

I think CB350's have 18" front and rear, CL has 19" front. I believe a larger diameter improves stability, it'd be a good point to ask the aforementioned experts, as they have experience with motorcycle geometry.

Here's a tip; the rear rim on your bike is a 1.85" ;)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: xb33bsa on Dec 17, 2014, 09:13:58
when drilling out the screws use a smaller bit ,so you dont drill into the case use a 15/64 inch bit, one size under 1/4" this is all the bigger you need to pop the head off the screw, bonus is it will go in easier
be careful not to loose the ball bearing out the clutch push rod actuator dealy bob
edit redliner beet me to it  :)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Dec 17, 2014, 09:15:19

be careful not to loose the ball bearing out the clutch push rod actuator dealy bob

Thank you, I did not want to have to refer to the parts manual for the pointless technical names ;D
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 17, 2014, 10:26:31

Replace the swing arm bushings with brass. They're a slight interference fit, so you'll need to freeze the brass and heat the swingarm and press the two together, preferably without just beating it in.

As for wheels, I don't believe you'll comfortably fit more than a 1.85" rim on the front with a 3.00" tyre. 2.15" on the rear with a 90 or 100mm with 90% profile would be the max. I'd prefer a 90 back there. If the rubber is too wide, you lose sidewall structure.


Thanks as always for your advice! I did actually hear about the brass bushings and was planing on doing that. I saw a guy on Youtube who did exactly what you mentioned (froze the bushings and heated the swing arm), so I was fully planing on doing just that, so thanks for confirming my thoughts. Any idea where I can source these brass bushings? Or do I need to fabricate?

As for the rims/tires, I have already fully researched and got some great advice from some experts. I ordered a 90/90 front on an  18x1.85" rim and a 90/100 rear on an 18x2.15". An experienced rim maker named Kennie Buchanan of Buchanan Spokes told me from personal experience that this combination works perfectly for this bike as he owns one himself. Great guy! Super helpful.


I think I saw a ball in your clutch throw-out lever, is this correct? If so, keep track of this and make sure it's still round.
I also see that your clutch rod has a ball-end. You do not need this ball if you have this ball end. In my experience you won't be able to properly adjust the clutch if you have it and don't need it, or need it and don't have it. Did you ever kick the bike over to feel compression with the ball fitted?


when drilling out the screws use a smaller bit ,so you dont drill into the case use a 15/64 inch bit, one size under 1/4" this is all the bigger you need to pop the head off the screw, bonus is it will go in easier
be careful not to loose the ball bearing out the clutch push rod actuator dealy bob
edit redliner beet me to it  :)


Guys  :o .. I think I lost the ball bearing! It was only until after I had taken off the cover that I noticed in the manual there was a small ball bearing in that "dealy bob" thing! I went back to the cover and looked at the assembly and didn't see it. It MAY just be camouflaged in grease from the chain/sprocket.. I don't know. How bad is this if I lost it? I know it's a "Steel Bearing #10 5/16" at least that's what the Fiche says.. oops  :-[ Are they replaceable? I have to imagine that there must be a replacement somewhere on this earth.. but where!?  ???

Thanks again for your input guys.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 17, 2014, 11:21:04
IT'S TAUNTING ME!!!!

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Dec 17, 2014, 12:08:31
Read my first reply to your video, post 34, about the ball.

I'm running the exact same rim/tyre setup on a Black Bomber now.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: alzcbz on Dec 17, 2014, 12:24:43
Yes you need it and it is just a common 5/16" steel ball bearing. Probably pick up at any local hardware if you can't find it.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Dec 17, 2014, 12:27:05
He doesn't need it if his rod has a ball-end. He can't find it likely because it's not there. I've heard this happen quite a few times.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 17, 2014, 12:29:08
I'll take some close ups next time and you can see closer and explain more because I'm still a bit unclear. Either way, sounds like it's easily replaceable if I DO need it.. Cheers guys.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: DrJ on Dec 17, 2014, 13:01:03
You can find that ball bearing at any bicycle shop.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: xb33bsa on Dec 17, 2014, 14:26:54
I'll take some close ups next time and you can see closer and explain more because I'm still a bit unclear. Either way, sounds like it's easily replaceable if I DO need it.. Cheers guys.
yes you need it but dont fret about it till you get ready for assembly
if it is still there a maggot on a stick will pull it outta the greese fer safe keaping
Title: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Dec 17, 2014, 14:28:58
if it is still there a maggot on a stick will pull it outta the greese fer safe keaping

Now THAT'S one helpful larva ::)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 31, 2014, 15:12:25
Happy Holidays everyone and Happy New Year!

For my 5th session, I took the engine out of the frame and removed the front fork assembly. The engine was pretty tricky to take out seeing as I had to use my dads car jack! With my dad steadying the frame I was able to slide it out. Good thing for the manual on this one as it said to take the engine out from the right side. I did not realize the frame was lower on that side, making engine removal easier, until I removed the engine. Another reason to always look at the manual ahead of time.. Learning that more and more as I go.

Really excited to see the engine out and the frame bare!! So many things I can move on with now like modifying the frame to fit a hoop and custom seat. I am really looking forward to using the angle grinder on that!

Here's my exploits in engine and fork removal:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3dTIunkGbss

here's some pics:

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Dec 31, 2014, 16:10:29
But sometimes the manual do lie.

The manual was written when the bike was fresh and all the testing and experimenting that was done was Honda's own. After 50-years, some ole farts have found what works best. As well, we now strictly use unleaded fuel, which effects some adjustments. Oil has also advanced.

Then there are discrepancies. Sometimes a manual will simply have a typo or incorrect procedures. It's good to have several manuals so you can cross-check them. The pre-K4 Honda manual is inconsistent in some regards to the K4 manual. Usually, you'll go with the later one, but sometimes they are model-specific.

I know it's confusing, but you'll eventually have a basic sense of what goes where and when.

Here's an example.

I don't know what octane rating you use there, but I doubt you will need 98 (R+M)/2.

I get this a LOT. I ask a customer "do you have fresh fuel in the tank." "YEP! Just filled up with premium, no regular crap."

I know the manual says 91-95 octane, too lazy to look, but that's the RON number. Most pumps will use the average of RON and MON, so at a pump that says (R+M)/2, 87 or 89 would be equivalent to the manual's RON number.

The idea is to use the lowest octane you can without knocking. No knock, no worries.

Also, premium does not "burn cleaner" than regular or lower octane fuels. So don't feel like you're feeding your bike crap just because it's cheep, and smile at the chump that's pouring "premium" into his Nissan.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: TheCoffeeGuy on Dec 31, 2014, 16:38:19
Buy some metric sockets.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: ApexSpeed on Dec 31, 2014, 17:55:27
Great fun to follow, as this same bike will be my target next spring for my first rebuild. And Redliner, PLEASE keep offering advise and comments—your experience and insight is invaluable not just to Tony, but a lot of other greenhorns, as well. Two thumbs up.

Buy some metric sockets.

I thought I was the only one cringing at the Imperial tool choices. Also, JIS (http://www.vesseltools.com/hand-tools/screwdrivers/jis-japanese-industrial-standard/view-all-products.html) (Japanese Industrial Standard) screwdrivers and JIS bits on an impact screwdriver will be a big help to you, Tony. They aren't regular Phillips screws on the old Japanese bikes, which is why they are all stripped out. The right tools for the job make everything easier (grandpa was right). Hope this helps.


doug
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jan 02, 2015, 03:00:25
As usual, thank you for the advice everyone! Really appreciate the feedback and sharing of knowledge, it's all really helpful.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jan 07, 2015, 16:50:47
I have a few burning questions as I'm getting deeper into this build. I am almost through editing part 6 of my build process and have been busy meticulously sanding down the aluminum parts to give them a nice shine (pics/video to come) and torturing myself in the process... Can't stop now... must.. keep.. sanding!!

In the meantime wanted to know if anyone could help out with the following info:

1) I am looking for a reliable source for bronze bushings for the swing arm on my CB350. Anyone have any good sources for well made bronze bushings?

2) Since removing the forks from the bike and seeing the surface rust that has gathered near the top of the stanchions, I am wondering how to remove/repair this? Since it is chrome if I'm not mistaken. Does anyone have any tips for cleaning these stanchions or do I need to source new ones?

3) I have my sights set on a pair of Hagons for the rear shocks. Can anyone advise as to what length I should buy? I realize I could probably just measure the stock ones and go from there but I was looking to get some opinions about better handling with lower vs higher shocks, keeping in mind I am 80% sure I'm putting clip ons (or similar) or drag bars perhaps which will lower my stance, shifting my weight slightly forward. I'm approx 5'10" and weight 165lbs. Also, what is a good source to purchase these shocks?

Thanks in advance for any help!!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: carnivorous chicken on Jan 07, 2015, 18:25:49
Buy some metric sockets.

Can't agree with this more, and am baffled that you were able to tear down a bike without them.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jan 07, 2015, 18:44:02
Can't agree with this more, and am baffled that you were able to tear down a bike without them.

Dually noted. Thank you good sirs.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: TheCoffeeGuy on Jan 08, 2015, 08:23:38
http://charlies-place.com/product-category/bronze-swing-arm-bushings/
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jan 14, 2015, 21:02:07
http://charlies-place.com/product-category/bronze-swing-arm-bushings/

Thanks man, but I believe those are the wrong ones. There are 4 on the CB350 and they are more stubby than that. I appreciate it though man!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jan 14, 2015, 21:15:52
So for my 6th session I took the angle grinder to the frame to clean it up a little bit. I needed to cut off some of the tabs and make room for the battery box I want to fit underneath the new seat. I did not want to cut the back of the frame off yet as I was looking to get some advice from anyone on here who could lend it and also from some friends of mine.

Next, I tried to tackle taking the tires off the rims to get to the spokes and hubs but failed miserably with some old ass tire irons my dad had laying around. I bought a nice set of tire irons in the meantime and will get to the wheels on another wrench session. Having failed with the wheels I moved onto the swing arm bushings. Those little buggers are hell to remove! I did a bunch of research on how to remove them (some people are pretty creative! lol) and found the best method was with a punch and hammer. Smashed my hands a few times though but all worked out. Using this method will seriously damage the bushings, so beware! You're best bet is to replace them anyway with bronze bushings as they are far more superior and will last basically a life time. If you're looking for bronze bushings, contact Bob Franzke at franzke@attglobal.net and he will set you up nicely if you tell him you're from the forum.

After this I started on the reconditioning process on my aluminum parts, etc. I am going for a mirror shine on my engine side covers, forks and hubs. The process is going to take a while but I think it's going to look pretty amazing when it's all done. I soaked the greasy parts in Super Clean for a little bit and gave them a scrub with a small wire brush and it seemed to work perfectly. I also rinsed the parts thoroughly in warm water and even gave them a good scrubbing with a cleaning brush and soapy water. The super clean left the aluminum a little oxidized, but it did not matter as I plan on cutting into them with sand paper and buffing wheels. Be warned though if you're just looking to clean some of your parts and you use that Super Clean stuff, it will oxidized your aluminum and darken it significantly. As you will see in the video it works quite incredibly with chrome parts though!!

I've organized all the parts for PC in one box and all the parts that need to be reconditioned in another as you will see below.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IsTWSSw5JXY

Here's the process of the frame modification, pictures of the parts set for reconditioning and pics of the parts set aside for powdercoat.




Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Jan 14, 2015, 23:26:42
Using water while removing tyres? 1. Break the bead all around on that side first. Then once you work it off, break the other side completely. 2. Replace the tubes and tube protector strip. Actually you could use duct tape to protect the tube. It's whatever. 3. Once your tyre is on, inflate the tube just a little (not even enough to register on most air gauges) and bounce the tyre on the ground a few times in different spots to work out any kinks or twists. Baby powder on the tube is a must.

Just look at other tyre installation tips on the site for the basics.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jan 15, 2015, 00:39:42
Cheers Redliner.. I used the soap and water to help lube the tire a bit to pry it off. My teacher in tech class showed me the tip when we covered tyre changing one day. Installing all new rims, spokes and tyres on this ride so I'll get them properly installed at a shop. I think it's worth the $15, saves me wrestling them on when they can do it in 3 seconds with that machine! The new tyres I bought are tubeless, so I'm looking forward to that!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Jan 15, 2015, 01:35:36
The tyres are tubeless, spoked rims are not.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Woodsy11 on Jan 15, 2015, 22:10:12
Still enjoying your videos dude. Glad to see progress. Bit by bit!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: TheCoffeeGuy on Jan 15, 2015, 22:40:25
+1 on the spoked Rims Redliner
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jan 16, 2015, 10:54:08
+1 on the spoked Rims Redliner

Sorry but what does that mean?
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: carnivorous chicken on Jan 16, 2015, 11:06:16
You can use tubeless tires on a spoked rim, but you still need a tube -- spokes aren't airtight. There are a few ways people try to get around this, e.g. by trying to seal the backside of the spokes, but it's half assed at best and risky at worst.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jan 16, 2015, 11:07:24
You can use tubeless tires on a spoked rim, but you still need a tube -- spokes aren't airtight. There are a few ways people try to get around this, e.g. by trying to seal the backside of the spokes, but it's half assed at best and risky at worst.

Ahhh.. gotcha! So I still need tubes in my tubeless tyres basically. Cool, cheers guys.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jan 19, 2015, 21:27:49
So to continue on with part B of my 6th session, I went about thoroughly cleaning the engine covers from all grease and dirt and started with the wet sanding process. My plan is to go through the parts with the wet sand paper up to probably 400 or 600, starting with 220. The reason for this is that after doing some more research found a method of buffing that cuts into aluminum, acting just like sand paper but eliminating a crap load of time and manual labor.

I will go more into depths about buffing in the next post, but for now I am quite happy with the result from sanding after this last session. As you'll see from the video I spent a good amount of time on the rear brake panel and got it looking pretty amazing. I was almost tempted to leave the brushed metal look that the 220 wet/dry sandpaper left but I am way too excited to take it further after seeing it come to life slowly.

I would say I worked about 3 and a bit hours on the rear brake panel but seriously I just about got wood during the process lol.. Seriously, this is probably the most fun I've had in awhile. I feel like I'm bringing a machine back to life, it's an insanely gratifying experience. I under estimated the amount of time this would take and did not get to finish all of the parts in this video, but will save it for another episode. I have my work cut out for me, so it might take me awhile. The larger pieces with the tight spots in particular are going to be the most work.

For now enjoy the next video in the series.. I'll be sanding the shit out of some aluminum!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yv2f8O720UA

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: ShaggyPit on Jan 20, 2015, 01:28:11
Hey man!

great post so far! loving the videos and will be following this one closely
we are almost at similar parts in the build and I just spent an hour and half out in the garage wet sanding some engine covers...although they are still on the engine and havent had the courage to pull them off just yet! haha will do that this weekend hopefully.
definitely respect the level of shine you are trying to achieve, hopefully I have the determination to get there as well! otherwise the brushed metal might be where I end up haha

keep up the solid work! and thanks for providing some inspiration to get out there and polish until my fingers hurt haha
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Jan 20, 2015, 09:20:04
I really like the "heavy industries" brushed look in your pics. Some builds need a lot of shiny bits, some are happier being more conservative.

If you do plan to use the polishing wheel, you will want to sand up to 800. That's as high as you'd go. Any higher and all of your work will be undone the first time any protective coating comes off. Aluminum oxidizes very very quickly. On a micro level, it's almost instant. Make sure you get any rough parts and pits with the first step of sanding because the 400 is going to wear your arm out of socket trying to smooth any of that out. Go up to 800, use a wheel with compound, wipe it down with spirits, then add a coat of sealant for aluminum right away if you choose to go with a shiny finish.

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jan 21, 2015, 16:42:24
Hey man!

great post so far! loving the videos and will be following this one closely
we are almost at similar parts in the build and I just spent an hour and half out in the garage wet sanding some engine covers...although they are still on the engine and havent had the courage to pull them off just yet! haha will do that this weekend hopefully.
definitely respect the level of shine you are trying to achieve, hopefully I have the determination to get there as well! otherwise the brushed metal might be where I end up haha

keep up the solid work! and thanks for providing some inspiration to get out there and polish until my fingers hurt haha

Cheers bud! Ya keep up the good work man :)

I really like the "heavy industries" brushed look in your pics. Some builds need a lot of shiny bits, some are happier being more conservative.

If you do plan to use the polishing wheel, you will want to sand up to 800. That's as high as you'd go. Any higher and all of your work will be undone the first time any protective coating comes off. Aluminum oxidizes very very quickly. On a micro level, it's almost instant. Make sure you get any rough parts and pits with the first step of sanding because the 400 is going to wear your arm out of socket trying to smooth any of that out. Go up to 800, use a wheel with compound, wipe it down with spirits, then add a coat of sealant for aluminum right away if you choose to go with a shiny finish.

Redliner, excellent advice as always! Thank you. Is Autosol a good sealant?
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Feb 07, 2015, 19:32:56
I'm back! Sorry it's been awhile but shining these parts has proven to be quite time absorbing, but every bit worth it!! Video and pics to come. For now though I had to work on getting the forks apart in order to measure the springs, replace the seals, replace the bearings in the hubs and get everything shined up with the rest of the aluminum parts. I ran into a slight problem dismantling the forks though, please watch the video to see what I mean and comment if you have any guidance. At the time when I was shooting the video, I was under the impression that the inner assembly for the forks came apart at the bottom when it actually comes apart at the top with the large bolt. For some reason the damper rod will not come loose from the bolt and I can't seem to get it apart. I posted the question in another forum but no one has responded. The post is here: http://www.hondatwins.net/forums/51-frame-suspension-steering/35499-need-help-question-about-1973-cb350-front-forks.html

The wheels came apart with no real issue and I am excited to shine up these hubs!! I took all of the parts up to 800 with the wet/dry sand paper, there are some pics below of the before/after. I will post the finishing results in the next major post after I have buffed out all of the parts next weekend. Not having a garage where I reside has proven to be.. annoying. This whole process would have probably taken much less time if I didn't have to travel by train for an hour and a half every time I wanted to work on the bike. Anyway, I am enjoying this so much that secretly I never want it to end but at the same time am ecstatic to see this bike come back together!

Anyway, here's the latest video!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qs5nY-N59mc

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: xb33bsa on Feb 07, 2015, 19:50:37
nice work on that sidecase !!
why is the tire still on the rim ? didn't you find it a trite inconvenient working around it as it flopped all over ?
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Feb 07, 2015, 21:03:23
Haha I must've wrestled with that damn tire for about 45 minutes just trying to get it off of the rim!!! It was INSANE! It just wouldn't budge!! So I just left if on the rim for now, used the tire iron to move the tire out of the way to get to the back of the nipples.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: xb33bsa on Feb 07, 2015, 21:12:22
there is a tricktoit
but its real easy a long bar or 2 and a BFH  ;)
Title: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Feb 07, 2015, 21:31:35
Not sure how useful the windex is when removing the tyre.

When you crack the top-nut on the fork stanchion, it might be a good idea to just crack the upper triple clamp one turn. Let the lower triple and fender keep it from spinning.

Coming along well. Wish I had time for my 350 but I'm busy working on everybody else's toys... Woe is me.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: High On Octane on Feb 07, 2015, 22:09:56
Not sure how useful the windex is when removing the tyre........


I use Windex for mounting my tires, it works pretty good as a lubricant and evaporates clean.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Feb 07, 2015, 22:10:44
Mounting, I understand. But removing...
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Mar 11, 2015, 08:04:16
WOW! It's been a little while, but I am BACK with a new post! I have been insanely busy with these aluminum parts. The buffing process took a lot longer than I had originally anticipated but I am EXTREMELY happy with the results as you will see in the pics/video below.

I went on a few snowboarding trips at the end of February so I didn't get a chance to work on the bike much in the last month. I spent two whole days buffing out these parts (8-10hrs each day!) and was still not done! So I had to wait 3 weeks to get back in the garage at the beginning of March to finish everything off. I spent another 11-12hrs finishing everything up this past weekend. This project is very much full steam ahead so don't worry, I have not given up. I have been researching a lot in the off hours, learning about the engine and the work that I intend to complete. I have a few manuals on the way and I am very excited to move on to the next stage of this project. 

The entire process of bringing these aluminum parts to a mirror finish has been an incredibly time consuming but fun and rewarding experience for me. It feels really good to see such amazing results after putting so much time & effort into this process. It all started in late December when I cleaned and degreased each part. Then I spent most of January wet sanding each part through 4 stages of sand paper (220, 400, 600, 800) whenever I had free time after work and on weekends. After the sanding process I went through each part with three buffing compounds, black, brown and white. I used a sisal wheel with the black emery compound to cut into the metal and a cotton spiral sewn wheel for each the brown and white compound. I would say I spend approximately 14-20 hrs on some of the individual parts because of the complexity of the shape. I thought of giving up at times (especially during the sanding process). It was pretty difficult and time consuming to sand into the little crevasses that some of these parts have. I obviously didn't give up and kept positive and worked through it. Best thing about this is that I have an amazing story and experience to share with others and I feel like I've studied every single inch of these parts and know them like the back of my hand.

I would recommend trying this process to anyone who has the work ethic for it. You won't regret it. I saved one of the smaller parts until the end and have shot a quick video of me taking it through the entire process from start to finish in real time explaining each step of the process in detail. I will post that in the upcoming days, so keep your eyes peeled for that if you're interested.

Here is the latest pics & video, I hope you don't break your eyeballs when looking at the miraculous results of my shiny parts:

http://youtu.be/ORPrkPs4h98
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: M.B Co on Mar 11, 2015, 08:33:52
Holy. shit.

Good job. How many hours do you have in that?
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: goldy on Mar 11, 2015, 08:58:21
I don't know why more people don't take the time to do this. Those Japanese castings polish up so nicely. Keep up the good work, BZ!

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: jag767 on Mar 11, 2015, 09:08:03
Holy. shit.

Good job. How many hours do you have in that?

+1 for time well spent. It's a complete bitch to do, especially when you feel like a hamster on a wheel the whole time, but the end result is awesome! The only problem I've had is the oxidation afterwards. Sure you can clear over it, but the high temp engine clear tends to yellow I've found. Clear powdercoat?
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: DrJ on Mar 11, 2015, 11:11:16
Good job, now ditch those rusty old steel rims for a pair of shiny aluminums.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Mar 11, 2015, 15:29:50
Holy. shit.

Good job. How many hours do you have in that?

Haha thanks! Exactly the response I was hoping for after all that hard work. I'm not sure I understand the question but I will try to answer as best I can.. How many hours in total??? That's a tough one to answer. I would say anywhere from 12-20hrs per part total process. The larger pieces with the tight spaces take the longest amount of time for everything. It took me a few months working mostly on weekends. The sanding process was intense.. I was coming home from work and sanding for 3 hr sessions on multiple nights during the week.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Mar 11, 2015, 15:32:19
I don't know why more people don't take the time to do this. Those Japanese castings polish up so nicely. Keep up the good work, BZ!

Thanks man! I know, I almost couldn't believe my eyes watching these parts transform. Time well spent as far as I'm concerned.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Mar 11, 2015, 15:36:06
+1 for time well spent. It's a complete bitch to do, especially when you feel like a hamster on a wheel the whole time, but the end result is awesome! The only problem I've had is the oxidation afterwards. Sure you can clear over it, but the high temp engine clear tends to yellow I've found. Clear powdercoat?

Really? I haven't that! Thanks for the tip. I knew they oxidize quite easily at this stage though. I did plan on clear powdercoating them, unless I hear of a better solution. A guy told me about this product called ShineSeal and I looked it up. Looks a bit gimmicky but seems to seal up the aluminum well. Only thing is it only lasts a few years... Definitely not going through this process every couple of years, that's for sure. So clear PC it is!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Mar 11, 2015, 15:39:30
Good job, now ditch those rusty old steel rims for a pair of shiny aluminums.

No doubt! Got a nice pair of SunRims and stainless steal spokes waiting to be laced up! Can't wait!!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: yorkie350 on Mar 11, 2015, 17:04:30
That sir is outstanding work 8)  the attention to detail and sticking with it no cutting corners is the mark of a dedicated DTTr  :P ime hooked all the way with ya project, keep up the standard 8)  trying ya way and getting real results thanks man  :P
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Habanero52 on Mar 11, 2015, 19:21:17
Great polishing job!!!!!!
Title: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Mar 11, 2015, 19:32:03
Don't worry about re-doing it every few years. If you rub a good protectant onto it, then once a year or so you clean it off with some solvent, thoroughly dry the parts, then coat it again, you probably won't need to use the buffing wheel.

It's just like protecting your car paint with wax. Wash the old wax off, dry and clay thoroughly, then wax over it again. No need to repaint the car. Hah.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Fr_Gus on Mar 11, 2015, 19:50:37
WOW great job. This inspired me to do the same to my parts. 
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: pacomotorstuff on Mar 11, 2015, 21:15:03
If you want a real old time look, go for shouldered aluminum rims.  I got a set of knock-off looks like Akront rims for the Baby Tracker and the extrusions look better than the original Akronts I have.
I can look up the vendor (in California) if you are interested - email or PM me.
Buchanan spokes are the bomb if you can afford them - I met Jim Buchanan at the Motorcycle Dealers Show Daytona Speed Week 1973 - and the kids are keeping up the quality of the merch.
Alternative would be powdercoat your old spokes or buy Far East ones.
BTW, love the polishing job.
Pat
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Mar 31, 2015, 13:09:01
Hey guys! Just a quick update/video before I move on to some major progress on the 350.

I wanted to make a video to show and teach people the exact process I went through to achieve that mirror finish on my motorcycle parts. I saved one of the smaller parts until last (the oil filter cover) and took it through the entire process from start to finish. I hope you can get a real sense of what I went through to get this work done and that it also helps you achieve the same results. I had no idea shining aluminum was so technical and I did a lot of research to complete it, so I hope it helps some of you out.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YFGR4OQVwDc


On Another Note

the 350 is coming along fabulously. A few weeks ago I took the frame to Rob at Bullit Custom Cycles (http://www.bullitcustomcycles.com/) to get some help on cutting & welding on a seat hoop. He also built me a really nice electronics tray for under the seat and a nice seat pan! It's starting to mold and take shape.. It's really exciting!

I am currently in the process of editing the video and will be done soon. I hope to post pics and video within the next few days. :cool:

In the meantime I am dropping off the frame and various parts to get powder coated tomorrow night and should have that back in the next couple weeks. I have decided to only clear coat my hubs due to the fact that I do not want to cloud up all the work I put into shining up my aluminum parts. I was shown an example of what clear coating does to shiny aluminum and was not satisfied. I have come across a few products that will seal up my engine covers nicely, but am still doing a bit of research on that before I make my final decision. With these products, the seal only lasts a few years, so I figure it will be a lot easier for me to clear coat the hubs so I do not have to deal with them again anytime soon. It would be a real bitch to have to dismantle the wheels every couple of years to seal them again. The engine covers and fork tubes are very easily accessible and I will have no problem.

While at Powder, I intend on getting into the engine! I am doing the final check on engine parts I need to order and will be placing that in the next few days from Bore-Tech. So stay tuned!! Things are going to start coming back together and getting really exciting :D

Hope everyone else has been enjoying some brisk spring riding.. My XV750 custom is still in storage. Hoping to jump on her soon!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Apr 08, 2015, 23:36:41
Progress. It's a beautiful thing. A few weeks ago I took my frame up to Rob at Bullit Custom Cycles to get some metal work done and had a great experience hanging out with him at his shop for the day. The thing I really like about Bullit Customs is that they focus primarily on amazing customer service. Something I really feel is lacking today. When I mentioned to Rob that I needed some metal work done on my 350 he immediately invited me up to the shop to get a first hand experience. He welcomed my camera and my shenanigans, offered me a cigar and we went about grinding, drilling & welding. It was epic.

Rob cut the rear part of the frame and accurately measured & welded in a custom LED seat hoop. It has a groove cut into the rear part of the hoop which will integrate a high powered LED light strip for my rear running/brake light and signals. I cannot wait to wire that bad boy up! He then measured and cut a custom seat pan which fit the new seat hoop perfectly. Underneath it all he built an electronics tray that will fit my battery, Motogadget m-Unit and various other electronics. It fits nice and snug beneath the seat pan so everything will clean up very nicely when it comes time for wiring.

It was amazing watching Rob work and I learned a lot from him that day. I am fairly confident that with some practice I can do my own metal work on my next build (officially hooked!) once I get my own space and proper equipment.

I have recently dropped the frame and various parts off to be powder coated. I am eagerly anticipating the fresh paint so I can start building this bike back up. Once I get the frame & parts, I can start to assemble the new Buchanan rims, spokes and fresh Avon rubbers! Sooner or later I will have a rolling chassis on my hands and things will start to get really fun.

In the meantime, I am hoping to disassemble the top end of the engine this weekend! I am extremely excited for this. I’ve always wanted to work on my own engine and I’m pretty excited to be starting this process. I’ll get into more details about the engine stuff later as there will be some significant mods made… Things are happening, slowly but surely!

Enjoy the vid & pics!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2_F8EzykfQ

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Apr 08, 2015, 23:39:28
More pics..
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: CALfeRacer on Apr 08, 2015, 23:50:40
That's awesome that they let you in to the shop with open arms like that! Looks like some good welding, and I like how the original frame is tied in to the new hoop.
Gotta ask though, have you checked that you'll have clearance for the rear tire with the flat pan?
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Luugo86 on Apr 09, 2015, 02:00:00
did you slug those welds on the frame loop?
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: pacomotorstuff on Apr 09, 2015, 07:29:14
Did Rob box the upper frame rails?
Just wondered.
Pat
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: yorkie350 on Apr 09, 2015, 08:25:57
Great progress mate n sweet style coming thru love the LED idea might have to hijack that theme  :o look forward to ya next update  :P
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Apr 09, 2015, 11:32:51
That's awesome that they let you in to the shop with open arms like that! Looks like some good welding, and I like how the original frame is tied in to the new hoop.
Gotta ask though, have you checked that you'll have clearance for the rear tire with the flat pan?

Yup! Rob has a customers CB350 in his garage at the moment with another battery box he built, installed and fully put together and we checked for measurements on clearance on that before he made the box.

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Apr 09, 2015, 11:35:57
did you slug those welds on the frame loop?

Did Rob box the upper frame rails?
Just wondered.
Pat

I have no idea what any of this means lol! I'm not an experienced metal worker or welder. Care to explain?

Great progress mate n sweet style coming thru love the LED idea might have to hijack that theme  :o look forward to ya next update  :P

Thanks man! Ya the LED will be a sweet little touch! Cheers  8)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: CALfeRacer on Apr 09, 2015, 13:56:30
Cool, glad you guys checked! Looks like it's coming along nicely, and I agree about that LED in the hoop. Pretty slick!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Habanero52 on Apr 09, 2015, 14:15:59
Nice Cuban!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: DrJ on Apr 09, 2015, 23:29:31
Nice Cuban!

A small perk of living in Canada.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Habanero52 on Apr 10, 2015, 09:39:55
Lucky guys. I envy you!!!!!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: DrJ on Apr 10, 2015, 14:20:59
If your politicians play their cards right, Americans can enjoy their own Cuban cigars in the near future.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Habanero52 on Apr 10, 2015, 14:39:55
When have politicians played their cards right? LMAO.
Let's hope that they do soon enough before I die.

 :-\
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: JustinLonghorn on Apr 10, 2015, 14:43:24
I love when a nice Canuck brings some nice cubans to the get togethers here in the states. Mmmmm, Cigars.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Apr 10, 2015, 14:51:46
The Kennedy estate should still have a decent stash.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Apr 10, 2015, 15:39:19
 ;D I've been enjoying this conversation hahaha

If any of you Americans invite me to your garages I will bring you a nice Cuban  :D
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Habanero52 on Apr 10, 2015, 15:43:22
I am sure that Bubba Clinton has some real good ones. LOL!!!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Apr 27, 2015, 21:02:56
It's UPDATE O'clock!

This project is getting crazy fun now!! I have finally cracked into my first engine :D The following post explains exactly what upgrades I am making to the engine and will reference exact product info for those interested.

While the frame & bits were at the painter's getting powder coated I decided to crack open the top end. I am planning on doing a complete top end rebuild on this engine while leaving the lower end alone for the most part. In my research I found that a lot of people suggest to leave this part alone if you haven’t got that much experience and although I may take it to a professional to get inspected, I am going to leave it alone for now. I do wonder about replacing some of the seals though and figure that while I have this engine in pieces on the bench, it would make a lot of sense to get that done.. Mostly just for peace of mind going forward. Can anyone tell me their experience with this? Leave it alone or no?

For the top end I am upgrading the cam shaft, valves, valve guides, valve springs, pistons and cam chain tensioner. It took a bit of reading & researching, but I think I have found a good combination of upgrades that will work well in this engine. I have been dealing with Bill Moeller at Bore Tech specifically who has many years of CB350 race engine building experience and has been a BIG help in figuring this out. Many people from this forum know or have dealt with Bill and can attest to his expertise. I know this because his name popped up a lot in my searches for engine discussion. I will note that I am in no way affiliated with any of the people or businesses I mention in this thread, just found them through word of mouth or doing simple researching online.

From the beginning, I decided that I wanted an engine with more power. It's always been a dream of mine to do a project of this magnitude and have always wanted to “pimp out” an engine, so this is a dream come true for me. More power comes from more displacement, so I am boring out the cylinders to fit 67.5mm big bore race pistons from Bore Tech (3.5mm overbore). This is the largest overbore this engine will allow. It's also an expensive upgrade and I need to make sure all my components work together first, so Bill was a big help on figuring that out. I have learned that when you make an upgrade to one section of an engine, you have to upgrade certain other parts of the engine in order for it to work together seamlessly. Engines are very complex and if all the parts are not working together with tremendous efficiency then you will have breakdown. Overboring the engine means a higher compression ratio and more power. In order to deal with this power I need to have beefier valves that can handle it, valve springs and guides to deal with those valves and a better cam shaft to ROUND everything out (excuse the pun). These will all mesh well with the Mikuni carbs I am fitting. All this can be very costly and can start adding up rather quickly, so if you decide to upgrade your engine make sure you are prepared for the expense and try not to half ass it by upgrading certain parts without the others.

The new cam shaft I’m fitting is the Megacycle hard faced cam #12320-RG. This will pair nicely with Kibblewhite Racing’s valve spring kit, guides and Kibblewhite Black Diamond stainless steal intake/exhaust valves. Along with the 67.5mm Bore Tech pistons & Mikuni carbs, I will have a pretty bad ass little cb350 engine on my hands!

I have also learned that the cam chain tensioner originally installed in the CB350 engine can break down over years of use. It uses plastic rollers to tension the chain on the cam shaft and these have been know to break apart and cause havoc in the later years of the bikes life. There is a modern upgrade for this mechanism called a cam chain slipper or ‘KA Slipper’: http://bore-tech.com/product/13 …It replaces these rollers with a triangular Teflon slide that is much better than the original design. It seems like a no-brainer to replace these rollers, so that is what I am doing. During the process of the top end dismantle I looked closely at the rollers and they were beat up pretty bad. The teeth on the rollers were pretty much non existent at this point so I will be pleased to have them replaced. I am worried however as to the whereabouts of the plastic teeth inside my engine and will look closely for shards of plastic when I disassemble my oil pump and filter. This is another reason why I want to inspect the lower crankcase and make sure none of the oil wells have been plugged.

These upgrades require some machining to the cylinder head and cylinders. I need to get the cylinder head machined to fit the new, larger cam shaft and valve guides and the cylinders need to be over bored & honed. The well that the KA Slipper fits into needs to be ground a little to fit also. Last week I packaged up my parts and shipped everything off to Bore Tech in Ohio. I felt like a father sending his kid off to school for the first day of classes haha.. ridiculous. Anyway the parts arrived safely to Bill in Ohio and now the waiting game begins! After reading up on the Carbide Bore Process Bore Tech offers: http://bore-tech.com/Carbide%20Bore%20Process I felt very compelled to get this done! Go hard or go home I guess right?!

Anyway, this engine tear down was super fun and a great way to spend a Saturday morning! I would suggest trying this to anyone who has the tools and a manual handy. Take it step by step and in the words of my friend Rob; “Be at one with the machine”. It was pretty awesome seeing how these parts work together. I have been feeling so much more confident with my mechanic work lately because I really feel like I am getting to know this bike so well. It's amazing when I think back to when I first started this project. I was pretty unsure that I would be able to tackle some of these jobs but to be honest with you, the more I worked on it, the easier it became.

I have a lot of exciting things coming up with this build. Next on my list is getting the wheels put together after installing the new wheel bearings into my hubs. I need to lace and true the wheels and then install the tubes and tyres. Once this is finished I need to rebuild the forks and assemble the swing arm with my new bronze bushings. Soon enough she'll be a roller and I can properly measure the clearance for the rear wheel and custom seat pan before ordering my rear shocks. Because my seat pan is flat, I have to measure the distance at which the wheel will make contact with the seat pan and buy a shock with a total compressed length that is longer than that distance.

I still have the gas tank to clean up, the seat to upholster, an engine to reassemble, front suspension, brakes, front controls & wiring! Carbs to tune.. Design a paint job.. Some fun shit coming up!! Stay tuned!

For now enjoy the video and pics:

https://youtu.be/M2ft52Zg5NQ

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on May 05, 2015, 12:39:45
Nothing too crazy with this update, but getting deeper into the engine. I removed the clutch assembly, oil filter & oil pump with no big surprises. The deeper I am getting into the engine, the more I am realizing the PO took very good care of this bike. Everything is looking super clean compared to some engines I have seen. I’m pretty happy about that! I needed to check the wear on the friction plates & clutch springs and clean out the oil pump to make sure there’s nothing alarming inside there. Mostly for piece of mind. I did not find anything out of the ordinary though, so as the Thai people say.. Sabai Sabai!! (happy happy :D) Try not to cringe too much when I stick the screwdriver into the gears to remove the lock nut from the oil filter. I recently learned from another thread that using a penny to jam the gears works best because the metal is softer and won't damage the teeth in the gears. I'll know for next time.. Learn as you go and now you know.

Next I will crack these cases to get into the crank shaft and gears to make sure they are all in good working condition. For now though, here’s the video and a pic of the clutch assembly, oil filter & pump.

https://youtu.be/rl3CRRDhR5Y

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on May 05, 2015, 12:51:39
You should also inspect the baskets for wavy grooves from the plates banging against them. The grooves will make it difficult for the plates to move, so they will stick AND slip when riding. Sometimes they can be lightly sanded out. Too deep and you'll need to replace. (http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/05/05/e5a4d73b44fb8a03525a7eb13de96375.jpg)(http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/05/05/0ee215f507dc9979b1ef3e865785235e.jpg)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on May 05, 2015, 13:32:23
Oh wow.. ok awesome, thanks for the tip man!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on May 05, 2015, 15:53:58
The grooves on the inner basket I show were actually causing slipping and sticking. Replacing the inner and lightly cleaning up the outer cleared the issue.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: xb33bsa on May 05, 2015, 16:05:39
The grooves on the inner basket I show were actually causing slipping and sticking. Replacing the inner and lightly cleaning up the outer cleared the issue.

yeah the inner looked bad enuf to cause an issue ,but is very rare issue on street bikes
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on May 12, 2015, 23:53:38
So.. I split my very first engine case! It was a pretty cool experience and I was pretty nervous at first but everything worked out really well. I was really careful not to damage the cases and made extra sure to note all the dowels and little bearing pieces and pins that are littered throughout the cases. My next move will be to test the crankshaft/bearings for runout and make sure everything is in good working order. When I did split the case I was pleasantly surprised to see that this is a very very clean and well maintained engine!

I am still awaiting my new parts and machined pieces from Bore Tech so in the meantime I need to give these cases a good cleaning and look into vapour blasting or soda blasting to clean them up so I can paint them. My plan is to paint the body of the engine black because I think it will contrast well with the shiny aluminum bolts & covers. My only concern is that painting the engine black will have an adverse effect on the temperature of the engine. Am I just being paranoid or is this a valid concern?

I also read about being careful with what type of media you use to clean the engine pieces. Something about the wrong media can get inside the engine and cause havoc. Can anyone suggest or advise on how to clean these pieces without causing any harm?

Thanks and enjoy the pics & video!

https://youtu.be/rPpEokWjQlE
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: CALfeRacer on May 13, 2015, 00:24:31
Your engine pictures are so much better than mine are I think I'll have to use yours as reference when putting my engine back together hahaha.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: xb33bsa on May 13, 2015, 01:28:00
GOOD GOING ! be sure and clean out thoughrolly from undernesth the tin plate (windage tray inna sort of)that sits belo the crank , lotsa sentiment ends up there
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on May 13, 2015, 01:39:44
Yeah put some diesel or diesel/MMO mix under there and wash it out good. Don't be too worried about getting it spotless though. As soon as things are back together and you put oil in it, the cycle begins again.

Don't remove the rubber on the front outer cylinder studs. They help dampen an annoying ringing/buzzing sound. The same reason you have rubber pucks between the cooling fins.

If you have the option, choose vapor blasting. It also makes for a very attractive satin finish. Don't worry about paint. Tests were done on intercoolers that were bare aluminum vs painted black. The black ones performed better...negligibly so. Besides, look how many air-cooled bikes had painted motors from the factory such as Honda XL's.

Just be sure to DEGREASE THE SHIT OUT OF IT and treat it like a newborn with hemophilia: meaning don't drop it, ding it, or spill brake fluid on it.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on May 13, 2015, 12:48:16
Your engine pictures are so much better than mine are I think I'll have to use yours as reference when putting my engine back together hahaha.

HA! Cheers bud.. That's they're there for  :D

GOOD GOING ! be sure and clean out thoughrolly from undernesth the tin plate (windage tray inna sort of)that sits belo the crank , lotsa sentiment ends up there

Ok cheers for the advise, will do!  :)

Yeah put some diesel or diesel/MMO mix under there and wash it out good. Don't be too worried about getting it spotless though. As soon as things are back together and you put oil in it, the cycle begins again.

Don't remove the rubber on the front outer cylinder studs. They help dampen an annoying ringing/buzzing sound. The same reason you have rubber pucks between the cooling fins.

If you have the option, choose vapor blasting. It also makes for a very attractive satin finish. Don't worry about paint. Tests were done on intercoolers that were bare aluminum vs painted black. The black ones performed better...negligibly so. Besides, look how many air-cooled bikes had painted motors from the factory such as Honda XL's.

Just be sure to DEGREASE THE SHIT OUT OF IT and treat it like a newborn with hemophilia: meaning don't drop it, ding it, or spill brake fluid on it.

Redliner...  ;D hahaha always love the advice.. Thanks!! :D
What is diesel/MMO mix?? Diesel fuel?!? What about PineSol or simply Sunlight dish soap?

Title: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on May 13, 2015, 13:06:28
Diesel is probably the best oil solvent for the price. $2-3 per GALLON. Sometimes I mix with Marvel Mystery Oil to break up really tough stuff and thicken it so it clings where it's needed. About 1L of MMO per gallon is a nice oily mix for cleaning anything without even harming soft parts.

PineSol is excellent stuff. I use original formula, not any citrus or scented stuff. Makes my carb bowls come out clean enough to drink out of, through with a slight aftertaste. That's the power of PineSol, baby
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on May 13, 2015, 14:10:09
haha wicked.. thanks dude!!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: DrJ on May 13, 2015, 15:54:43
You may want to consider making the baffle plate removable. In stock form, it's bolted and peened to the bottom case half making it difficult to clean out the debris at the bottom of the oil sump. I did this to mine. Level the small nubs then drill and tap the holes for M6 bolts.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on May 13, 2015, 16:21:31
Not really necessary though. Assuming any large solids are removed, what's the worst that could happen? Imagine the condition of the bottom of some of the cases of daily riders.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on May 13, 2015, 16:28:25
You may want to consider making the baffle plate removable. In stock form, it's bolted and peened to the bottom case half making it difficult to clean out the debris at the bottom of the oil sump. I did this to mine. Level the small nubs then drill and tap the holes for M6 bolts.

are you talking about this??

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on May 13, 2015, 16:42:00
Yes.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: xb33bsa on May 13, 2015, 16:55:02
You may want to consider making the baffle plate removable. In stock form, it's bolted and peened to the bottom case half making it difficult to clean out the debris at the bottom of the oil sump. I did this to mine. Level the small nubs then drill and tap the holes for M6 bolts.
that is what i did with mine , i thing i put in 10-24 screws ,it is just a simple detail project that costs nothing and ,makes  for feel good,starting out with a spotless interior  :)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on May 13, 2015, 16:56:08
I figure I would have to level those nubs to get that out! I'm going to try and avoid that and let it soak over night. The engine is actually pretty clean at the bottom so I'm confident I can get it clean under there. If I can't I may take your advice Dr J.. thanks again guys.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: DrJ on May 13, 2015, 21:43:04
Well since you're going all out with this engine rebuild…
Title: Help Please
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on May 21, 2015, 11:53:09
I am going to install my new bronze bushings and collars into the swing arm this Saturday and was wondering about the proper greasing procedure. I've got a plan for squeezing them with an all thread, some washers and nuts and just wondered if you pre-grease the collars and bushings OR pack the grease once fitted OR once fitted, use a grease gun to fill the inside?

Can someone please advise?

Thanks!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: oathamm on May 21, 2015, 12:22:48
How did you get the old ones out to start with? I'm at a similar stage in my build. Cheers
Title: Re: Help Please
Post by: xb33bsa on May 21, 2015, 12:41:47
I am going to install my new bronze bushings and collars into the swing arm this Saturday and was wondering about the proper greasing procedure. I've got a plan for squeezing them with an all thread, some washers and nuts and just wondered if you pre-grease the collars and bushings OR pack the grease once fitted OR once fitted, use a grease gun to fill the inside?

Can someone please advise?

Thanks!
you dont really need to worry too much about greasing untill final assembly,a light layer of grease when pressing in is a good thing as is lite greasing on assembly the grease fittings are fine for greasing after assembly
if you go to the likker store that sells dry ice for a few dollers you can get them cold enough to go in by hand
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on May 21, 2015, 12:44:13
How did you get the old ones out to start with? I'm at a similar stage in my build. Cheers

Used a punch and a hammer. They're a real bitch to get out and you'll need to replace them if you use that method. However a clever fellow on a different forum came up with a pretty nice way to remove them. Check out post's #9 & #10 in this thread for instructions and save your fingers!

http://www.hondatwins.net/forums/1-project-logs/35459-apexspeed-cl350-cafe-build-starter-rebuild.html
Title: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on May 21, 2015, 12:44:35
Yeah before you press them in, leave em in the freezer for a day and it'll just be that much easier. The all-threads is probably the best method for that sort of press fitting.
Title: Re: Help Please
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on May 21, 2015, 12:46:00
you dont really need to worry too much about greasing untill final assembly,a light layer of grease when pressing in is a good thing as is lite greasing on assembly the grease fittings are fine for greasing after assembly
if you go to the likker store that sells dry ice for a few dollers you can get them cold enough to go in by hand

Great advice! Ok thank you.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jun 01, 2015, 16:20:39
A lot going on and wanted to write an update as to what’s been happening. My laptop died on me! So I am without editing software to finish the next video installment at the moment.

I am still waiting for my top end to come back from Bore Tech.. getting really antsy to start putting that motor back together! Mostly because I don’t want to forget where everything goes! haha I stupidly stripped a screw holding the starter motor in place on the upper crankcase so I will need to tap that and get that out somehow before I send these cases to get vapor blasted. I’m not exactly sure if the starting motor can safely withstand the blasting process or not, maybe someone can advise? I ordered a JIS screw driver but it’s been a damn month and still not shown up! Invest in a JIS screw driver if you want to take this bike apart!! Can’t stress that enough. Don’t be an impatient douche like me!

I also realized that since I am getting a hard faced cam it would make sense to hard face my rocker arms also as they were looking a little beat up. I mailed those off to Megacycle Cams about 4 weeks weeks ago and am hoping to get those back this week.

I installed the All Balls tapered steering bearings into the frame and steering stem and will share with you my struggles with that in another post, once I get the video done. I also installed my new bronze bushings into my swing arm using an all thread, some bolts and washers and it worked beautifully. I came to the realization that I needed new dust seals for the swing arm axle bolt, so I am also waiting for those to arrive before I attach everything to the frame. Also on a recommendation from Apex, I would like to upgrade the zerk grease fittings on the swing arm axle bolt before I put all that together, so that’s high on my list.

I also sealed my aluminum engine cases using a product called Shineseal. The whole process took about 3 hrs to do and about 12 hrs drying time. I will also go more into detail about that in a future post.

My new Race Tech springs and fresh fork tubes from Forking by Frank showed up last week! So I will soon rebuild the forks. I am also waiting for my upper triple top to come in from Cognito Moto before I can start putting the front end together, but it’s getting there!

High on my agenda is painting the wheel hubs. I ran into a major wall working on those. My plan was to clear coat them but I realized right before I went to take them that there are rubber bushings in the rear hub! They won’t do well in the baking process that the clear coat requires. My options were to remove them and replace them or leave them in and use a clear coat from a spray can.. I decided on taking the can route! I looked up how to remove them and started the process but I knew it would be a huge pain in the butt and I would damage them significantly. I tried looking up replacements online before I went ahead with that and they were pretty hard to find. I did eventually find them for about $17 US a piece (4 in total). PLUS shipping & import charges which I am finding out recently are quite significant! Also the little pieces behind the bushing that seal the inner hub are literally not findable.. I scoured the interwebs!! But to no avail. I called my friend Rob for some advice and he said to look for a spray clear coat for Mag Wheels. Sure enough I found this stuff, did some research on the results and was very satisfied. So I bought a few cans and I will spray these hubs soon, install the new bearings and brakes and get these darn wheels built! I am very excited to see the Buchanan rims and spokes come together on these hubs!

Lots going on and will post that video as soon as I get my laptop fixed. Back to work!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jun 15, 2015, 12:10:16
I finally got my laptop all sorted and finished the video from the last post. Here it is if you are interested:

https://youtu.be/qFTEU2vr2mg

Heading to the workshop tomorrow to do some more work on the bike. Planning on clear coating my hubs and installing the bearings in them. I also received a sweet little package from Bore-Tech and all my engine parts looks INCREDIBLE! I am really excited to get this engine back together!

I was planning on using Hondabond HT to seal the cases. Can anyone advise if this is the correct stuff? Thanks!

Stay tuned!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: yorkie350 on Jun 15, 2015, 17:59:48
Fantastic update as usual mate :P looking forward to the next one , in my opinion frame and swing arm look 1st class in gloss black  8)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jun 19, 2015, 15:52:12
Fantastic update as usual mate :P looking forward to the next one , in my opinion frame and swing arm look 1st class in gloss black  8)

Cheers Yorkie!!

Just a quick update. After an 8 week wait, I have received a big ass goody box from the fine folks at Bore Tech. I will update with pics and video later. I clear coated the hubs last week with "Dupli-Color Clear Coat for Wheels" and was NOT very impressed with the results at all. It said in the instructions to leave it for 7 days to cure, so tomorrow I'll go back to the workshop to check it out. I am hoping that the paint will have settled and become shiny over time.. if not I am afraid to say that I will be buffing these parts out again! Probably.. we'll see. If I know myself that is probably what is going to happen. If they look good I plan on installing the bearings and lacing up the wheels.

I have also been spending a lot of time cleaning up the engine cases! They look fantastic (pics to come). I was debating on getting them media blasted but then after I soaked them in Pine-Sol and really pissed everyone off I live with, they looked really really good! So after I purchased a few more items I will be ready to get this engine back together!

To add to Captb's amazing and very handy 'Lower End Assembly Checklist' that's sticky'd in the engine section, I am planing on creating a video/photo check list for people to easily follow when putting this engine back together as I really think it will help a lot of people out. Thanks again Captb for posting that and I will be using it as a guide for my rebuild.

More to come...
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jul 15, 2015, 11:35:40
Heyooooooo Everyone!

I hope everyone is enjoying the summer! I’ve been (semi) busy with the build and also taking a bit of a step back from everything to enjoy my other motorcycle and the weather here in Canada. I did however recently get some work done in the shop and was able to make a little video from it. I finished up the process of clear coating my hubs and hit a few walls after that. The bearing install on the rear hub went well but not so much for the front hub. It seems I knocked the bearing too far into the hub after placing the spacer inside and I’ve seized the bearings. This is not good at all and means there is too much of a load on the inner race of the bearing. I was pretty annoyed at myself for doing that but after talking to a few friends about it and hearing their stories of stuff they screwed up while wrenching I began to realize this is all part of the process. So, if you ever find yourself screwing up, just remember that it happens to everyone! Learn from your mistake and try again. Don’t give up! (mostly) Everything can be fixed. So I am taking the front hub to a mechanic to get the bearings removed and new ones installed. I found a really reasonably priced set of bearings from Sirius Consolidated and they have a distribution center close by! Bonus not getting it in the ass from the border patrol.

I did not get any pictures of this wrench session due to the fact that I am basically brain dead… When I returned home after my day in the shop I went to remove my memory card from the camera and realized that I had left it in the USB transfer plug beside the computer at home! Basically I was shooting pictures with no memory card all day! lol .. Not my best day in the garage. The screen on my camera is broken so of course I had no idea. Anyway, nothing super exciting in this one, just a clear coat on the hubs and a few odd jobs around the garage for the bike (cleaning bolts, etc) and a bearing install.

Here’s the video if you care to watch:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w3flCA4jej4


Engine Update:
I am in the process of shooting a video of the reassembly process but I ran into a few walls with the engine. I measured my crankshaft with a dial gauge (thanks Dad!) and found that it was out of round in a few places! I am getting different specs from different manuals but basically it’s out of round by about 3 to 4 thousands of an inch. Vets of the site can you please advise??

I talked to one builder about it and he started by asking why I even took the damn thing apart in the first place. I realize that a lot of vets seemed to be annoyed by rookies or ‘home builders’ doing this but to them I say this… “Remember a time when you hadn’t seen the inside of an engine how curious you were to learn and figure it out for yourself?”. That usually wins them over. I am the type of person who needs to take things apart with my own hands, look at how they work and figure it out. I am a visual leaner and for me it was a no brainer to take this engine apart. I know this bike now. I know what every little part does and how it works. It makes me feel good that I know that and I think its important. I will sleep better at night knowing that if anything goes wrong with my bike I will know exactly what it is. That’s owners pride and I’m sure every single person reading this right now can level with me on that.

So.. My question to you is this:
What would you do if you found this on your crankshaft? The same builder who asked why I took it apart suggested that I leave it. His point was that if I’m not racing with this engine, if I’m not taking this engine to the max on a regular basis that I should leave it alone. I can’t say that I don’t agree with him. I don’t plan on winning AHRMA Championship or anything. Can these crankshafts be repaired? Do I find a replacement? Or do I just leave it and seal up the cases?

Thanks in advance for your comments. I am heading on vacation in Europe so it'll be some time before I get to the next post. Take care everyone and enjoy the summer!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: xb33bsa on Jul 17, 2015, 04:58:22
"out of round" tells us nothing,there is a very specific procedure for checking the crank berarings for radial clearance and also for concentricity of the crank unit as it is a built up crank
how did you fionmd what you found ?
all that said how did it run did it shake ?
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: TranceMachineVienna on Jul 17, 2015, 09:04:24
what a nice thread!thanks for sharing!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jul 17, 2015, 10:22:53
"out of round" tells us nothing,there is a very specific procedure for checking the crank berarings for radial clearance and also for concentricity of the crank unit as it is a built up crank
how did you fionmd what you found ?
all that said how did it run did it shake ?

I checked using the following method and the parts I've indicated with the red dots were measuring from 0.001 inch to 0.005 - 0.006 inch in difference.

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jul 17, 2015, 10:32:04
what a nice thread!thanks for sharing!

Cheers!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: xb33bsa on Jul 17, 2015, 12:25:32
I checked using the following method and the parts I've indicated with the red dots were measuring from 0.001 inch to 0.005 - 0.006 inch in difference.
so you are concerned about radil runout on the crank flywheels./ how did you have the crank supported doing this cherck ?
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jul 17, 2015, 13:24:15
so you are concerned about radil runout on the crank flywheels./ how did you have the crank supported doing this cherck ?

Yes. Sorry for not giving you all the info.. I do not have a v-block so I measured it while it was sitting in the upper crankcase (crankcase sitting upside down). Probably not the best way to measure it hence why I would like to take it in to someone who can measure it properly on a v-block.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Oct 28, 2015, 21:37:15
Hey Guys!

A quick update.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F_hUaFvmhFY


Also, here is a video and some pictures of the new engine components from Bore Tech! So damn excited about this stuff!! Cylinders have been treated to Bore Tech's Carbide Bore Process (http://"http://bore-tech.com/Carbide%20Bore%20Process") to fit their Big Bore pistons (http://"http://bore-tech.com/product/350-piston-kit-675-mm-big-bore-p675"). Cylinder head looks immaculate! New Kibblewhite valves & springs (http://"http://bore-tech.com/product/350-valve-spring-kit-30-30104") installed. Light port & polish on the head also, cleaned up really nicely! Cam case has been machined to fit the Mega Cycle hard faced #12320-RG Camshaft (http://"http://bore-tech.com/product/12320-bl-megacycle-new-billet-cam"). Rocker arms hard faced and reground by Mega Cycle, looking brand new. New KA Slipper  (http://"http://bore-tech.com/product/350-cam-chain-tensioner-ka1")cam chain tensioner to upgrade from the current rolling system. Dynatek Mini Coils. New timing chain... I think I just jizzed in my pants.

I really just can't wait to get this engine rebuild going. I have found a pretty reputable mechanic to help with the rebuild, which is very exciting news and will help me sleep at night once it's all said and done. After watching some of my content on YouTube he happily agreed to be on my show and allow me to film the entire process! So everything will be documented for those who want to learn along. I am pretty excited about the whole thing.

So for now enjoy the pics and video and I'll be back with more soon!

https://youtu.be/B6TBa90uZHQ

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: preachswanson on Oct 29, 2015, 21:53:56
Dude, I just have to say that I love the videos... I'm working on a 73 CB350 as well, so keep at it and say ahead of me so I can watch a video and make sure I'm not screwing something up  ;)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: redwillissuperman on Oct 30, 2015, 02:27:30

Dude, I just have to say that I love the videos... I'm working on a 73 CB350 as well, so keep at it and say ahead of me so I can watch a video and make sure I'm not screwing something up  ;)
Ahhhh, the student becomes the teacher.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Kcomrie71 on Nov 01, 2015, 11:38:04
Great job man! I've been following your vids on Youtube and just stumbled onto this build thread. Keep it up.  ;D
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Nov 03, 2015, 10:31:40
Dude, I just have to say that I love the videos... I'm working on a 73 CB350 as well, so keep at it and say ahead of me so I can watch a video and make sure I'm not screwing something up  ;)

Well that was the idea behind all of this.. knowing I would screw up eventually. We can all learn together! Thanks for the kind words.

Ahhhh, the student becomes the teacher.

haha I don't know about that.. More like the brave(stupid) kid who tests the ice on the pond first haha

Great job man! I've been following your vids on Youtube and just stumbled onto this build thread. Keep it up.  ;D

Thanks dude! I appreciate the support :D
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Nov 05, 2015, 23:26:06
NO sandblasting the cases.

Assemble the cases top and bottom, as well as the side covers and the parts attached to those that you wish to paint. Leave the jugs and top end off. Close all exposed threaded holes, blind holes, mating surfaces and other holes with Frog tape. It's green painters tape, best you'll find at a typical hardware store.

You basically want the interior of the cases completely sealed before media blasting. Using dry media will make the primer cling to the cases for good. Using vapor blasting on the jugs and top end will prevent oxidation and maintain a bare look. I prefer not to paint the top end because the mix of heat and occasional oil drop make it very tough to keep looking new. Carb cleaner will eat it right up and now your only option is to tear it down and start again.

It has been done before, so don't be discouraged if that's what you're looking for.
Title: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Nov 05, 2015, 23:27:13
The wheels here are powder coated but that deep gun gray and resonator is cerakote. Ceramic and gorgeous.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Nov 27, 2015, 23:38:47
NO sandblasting the cases.

Assemble the cases top and bottom, as well as the side covers and the parts attached to those that you wish to paint. Leave the jugs and top end off. Close all exposed threaded holes, blind holes, mating surfaces and other holes with Frog tape. It's green painters tape, best you'll find at a typical hardware store.

You basically want the interior of the cases completely sealed before media blasting. Using dry media will make the primer cling to the cases for good. Using vapor blasting on the jugs and top end will prevent oxidation and maintain a bare look. I prefer not to paint the top end because the mix of heat and occasional oil drop make it very tough to keep looking new. Carb cleaner will eat it right up and now your only option is to tear it down and start again.

It has been done before, so don't be discouraged if that's what you're looking for.

Thanks for the advice as usual man!!  8)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Nov 28, 2015, 00:06:44
Hey Guys!

Been really getting back into this project after taking time off in the summer and it feels really good to be getting back into the garage again. Been busy busy busy doing a lot of research on many different aspects of the bike. Lots of reading and reaching out to some experienced builders for advice. I think I may just know everything there is to know about motorcycle chains at this point. More on that much much later.. For now here's what I've been up to.

I originally sanded and buffed the hubs out to a nice glossy polished aluminum finish. I obviously needed to coat them with something to protect them from oxidization. I wanted to get them clear powder coated but had a really hard time getting the rubber bushings out of the rear hub. For those that don't know, you can't leave rubber parts in something that is being powder coated because they need to bake the part in an oven at high temps. I knew I was going to probably have to damage the rubber bushings in order to remove them so I luckily thought ahead and looked on the internets to see if I could find a replacement. They were impossible to find. Not only that they are pretty expensive. So I went for the spray can route and decided to clear coat them myself. I used the Duplicolor Clear Wheel coating and it left a really undesirable finish on the parts. I was disappointed. Then I decided that I would just paint them black because I thought that with the colour scheme I was thinking about it would actually look better. Again I mistakenly used the Duplicolor Wheel coating stuff. It only comes in matte black and I wanted glossy, so I had to also buy a can of glossy clear coat. I spent a lot of time re-sanding the part and painting them with both cans. It looked like **** and not only that since I used 2 cans and had so many coats of paint, it was really hard to get my spokes into the proper position because it was so thick. When I was building my wheels originally I ended up chipping a lot of the paint.. It was a nightmare. Well, if you're going to do something, do it right! (the 1st time). Learn from my experiences and take my advice and DO NOT USE THAT DUPLICOLOR GARBAGE!

I used VHT Brake Caliper Paint instead! I mean if Batman, Chuck Norris, The Fonz, The Hoff, Will Smith, Borat, PRESIDENT OBAMA!, THE POPE!, Rambo, The Terminator, Jules & Vincent and a damn Orangutan give the thumbs up.. You just don't argue with that.

So I had to strip the damn hubs to get that Duplicolor junk off. So time consuming, but I learned a valuable lesson and now I am passing it on to you. The VHT Caliper paint went on so nicely! One can gave me a really durable, super glossy finish. Plus, since I only had 3 coats it was a lot thinner and when I went to lace up the hubs the second time they went together with much more ease. I am not a salesman for this stuff, I just liked the way it went on. Plus you bake it for an hour in the oven at 200 degrees. I had my bearings in already but it was fine.

Lacing up the hubs felt really cool. Wheel building is a really neat process. Here is a video of how it went:

WHAT'S NEXT?

I've stripped the cases from all paint and grease using a store bought paint stripper that is friendly towards all metals. There are some that aren't safe on aluminum so be careful about that. After the strip was applied and thoroughly cleaned off I roughly sanded down the cases with 200 grit sandpaper to give the paint something to stick to. I was debating on getting my cases vapor blasted, but honestly, I really don't think they need it at all. They are super clean, stripped down to the bare metal and ready to be painted! I am going to use a Self Etching primer and then a high temperature glossy black paint. I am going for a nice black finish for the main parts of the engine. Some people say to skip the primer but I really don't understand why you would. It helps the paint set much better and it even recommends it on the instructions.. Why not just spend an extra tiny bit of money for the best results possible?? The last thing I want is the paint cracking and chipping in a few years and having to pull the engine to repaint.. No thanks. This time I'll do it the best way possible. I'll paint those up tonight at home and post pics/video later. I swear I am a damn ninja now with the rattle can since I have done it so many times!

After that I really want to build my forks and install my new springs. My appointment with the mechanic is next Saturday to get this engine all inspected and put back together! So excited to install all these new parts with the help of an experienced vintage bike mechanic.

Stay tuned for that. Hopefully have that update in mid December. After that I will install the motor onto the frame, then the forks/upper triple, swing arm and wheels will be ready! Dropping those off to another mechanic to get trued and rubbers installed next week. Over the holidays I will have my custom harness built and will be installing that hopefully over the holidays. For now I am researching front brake master cylinders and Mikuni Carbs set ups. So much reading but I am learning a ton!

It's all coming together quickly and I am giving myself a deadline of March 1st to get this bike firing up!!!

Until next time, thanks for your interest and support.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pawi9Mj1vdM

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: fatfurious2 on Nov 28, 2015, 00:14:56
looks like my old 350! good luck with yours!
(http://i93.photobucket.com/albums/l43/fatfurious2/00R0R_ja7R35lsEqz_600x450_zps786e3bd4.jpg) (http://s93.photobucket.com/user/fatfurious2/media/00R0R_ja7R35lsEqz_600x450_zps786e3bd4.jpg.html)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 02, 2015, 12:17:16
looks like my old 350! good luck with yours!

Thanks!


Getting ready to button up my engine this weekend and wanted to make sure I am organized. Just want to make sure I know how to install the KA Performance Cam Chain Tensioner, if otherwise can you please advise or point me in the direction of some online instructions please?

- I still need these parts I have marked in red for the install correct?

- I've read that you may need to shave some rubber from the OEM cam sprocket.. Is this correct or only in certain situations?
- I've also read that the install is a bitch because the chain is super tight, is this normal? Any recommendations on what to expect?
- The head has been machined to fit the new KA slipper so I'm good on that end
- I have the flat sided Tsubaki chain, so I should be good there

Can anyone post a diagram or pics of their install? I've only found this thread that tells me little info: Installing KA cam chain slipper?


Any other advice or guidance would be appreciated. Thanks again!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Dec 03, 2015, 03:38:41
- I still need these parts I have marked in red for the install correct?

Can't say #9 is necessary. The rest is absolutely. When you start to put that together it will become obvious quickly.

- I've read that you may need to shave some rubber from the OEM cam sprocket.. Is this correct or only in certain situations?

Can't say. I didn't have to touch the rubber on mine. Probably worn down anyway.

- I've also read that the install is a bitch because the chain is super tight, is this normal? Any recommendations on what to expect?

Nope. Since the sprocket can rest on the thin part of the camshaft until you're ready to lift it and the chain onto its mounting surface, it's very easy. Just DON'T install the tensioner rod housing until it's all bolted in, that means the sprocket on the shaft and the end-journals (points and tach take-off housings) are all in place. Mind the o-rings on the valve adjuster rods and lightly oil the points-side oil seal without getting the paper gasket wet.


- The head has been machined to fit the new KA slipper so I'm good on that end

Make sure it moves freely. Any binding will not allow it to take up the slack.

- I have the flat sided Tsubaki chain, so I should be good there

Great chains.

This was the only photo I took. Was dealing with borrowing people's phones for pics so it wasn't so easy then.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 03, 2015, 13:55:32
Redliner, thanks again as usual man! This is really helpful, I appreciate it.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 10, 2015, 18:09:55
Guys! I had the most amazing weekend and don't have a video to post YET, but I wanted to write about it while it was fresh in my mind. I took my engine in pieces to a vintage bike mechanic in Newtownville, ON to get help putting it back together. I was fairly confident I could do it myself, but I really thought it would be better to get some guidance and learn something in the process that I could share with everyone else. I was not disappointed!

The shop is called Busche's Garage and the owner is a guy named Jeff Busche. Super nice fellow and very knowledgeable about motorcycle mechanics. Comes from a Tool & Dye/Machining background with something like 25 yrs experience. Upon arrival we laid everything out on the shop benches. EVERY little piece. He went through it with a magnifying glass.. literally. I knew right away I was in good hands. He commented on the internal components saying they were filthy. I had been up until about 1am the night before cleaning them. I wasn't offended... far from it! I was impressed actually because I knew he was being thorough. He proceeded to run every single little gear, bushing, rod, etc etc into his parts washing tub. When he was finished I was nearly floored.. Everything looked brand new! being a clean freak, it was pretty satisfying to see the clean parts come out of the washer.

He also inspected the vital areas, measuring things and generally just giving the engine a once over. He looked at the crankshaft very carefully and inspected the rods and the bearings. It was really cool to watch. He was teaching me as he went.. I was nerding out big time. He used a fly wheel puller to remove the alternator and starting clutch. He took my starting clutch apart and inspected it thoroughly, noting that I would need to replace the rolling pins in the clutch. I inspected them myself and would suggest the replacement if you haven't in awhile. The pins can become warped causing the starting clutch to slip. His machinist brain is fantastical.

He also commented on the oil splash plate that's located in the lower crankcase (the one that sits underneath the crankshaft). He asked me if I attempted to remove it in order to thoroughly clean underneath it and I said I wasn't comfortable removing it because it has 3 rivets and I didn't want to mess anything up. Plus how was I going to put it back?! I had neither the tools or experience for that. I told him I used this bendable scrubbing brush to get beneath the plate and was satisfied with that... Well as I hung out with him more, I came up with the term "Busche Approved" and THAT was definitely NOT Busche Approved.

He immediately grabbed a hammer and a chisel and knocked those rivets off in about 3 seconds. Then, he made short work of the screws with his trusty hand impact driver and #3 Phillips! With 2 quick wraps and each screw was off! Pow Pow! We flipped over the plate to reveal a layer of caked on oil! The bottom of the plate was disgusting also!! Built up rust and gunk.. He looked like he wanted to smack me in the head and I felt a little embarrassed but he didn't mean it like that. He just wanted me to learn something and I did. Watching him do that will give me more confidence to remove things in the future and be a little more thorough in my cleaning. My "punishment" for not being thorough with the cleaning was to bust out the varsol and clean the bottom of the case! He also let me use his soda blaster to clean off the plate very well.. it looked brand new when I was done with it. He then proceeded to drill and tap a new thread for the plate. It needs some center support so the middle screw was vital. He did this with ease while I watched by on the sidelines.

I have to admit that I was a bit nervous of this foreign screw in my lower crankcase, directly beneath my crankshaft that whips around at mind bending speeds!! But I trust Jeff. We red locketited that bastard and installed a lock washer also. **sidebar about lock washers: For those that do not know.. They are those little washers with the slit in them that kind of curl slightly (the two ends do not meet). When you press on them they sort of look like a flat spring. Well this places a load onto the screw when compressed, which acts as like a stretching device that helps to keep the screw in place. Feeling pretty good about cleaning the bottom case underneath the windage plate! Knock a few more ticks off the list and I was really feeling good about bring it to a professional.

After we sorted out the windage plate and lower crankcase, it was time to properly lube up the clean internal parts and start the reassembly! Before that though he soaked the new cam chain in motor oil, said it was good practice. I like this guys style. He thoroughly cleaned off the grease that was on it when we took it out of the package. I can't remember what he called it but I think it was something like "packing grease" or something.. Maybe storing grease. I don't know but he wiped that crap off and we soaked the chain while we prepped the rest of the parts for the lower half of the engine.

He showed me how to properly pre-lube the parts with assembly lube. There are certain areas that really need the lube and others that it's important you do not add any lube whatsoever! I was completely unaware of this. He taught me that you do not add lube to the bearings that make contact with the crankcase in anyway. This is to allow for proper heat transfer. An important aspect of engine cooling. How can a bearing properly cool if it's insulated with a layer of goob!? I'm learning a lot. I would have definitely made the rookie mistake of slathering those bearings and gears with grease. He was very precise with it, getting it into the nooks and crannies of the moving parts.. again my soul was at ease. This engine is getting the treatment.

After everything was properly lubed up we starting installing the shift cam and shifting forks followed by the transmission. Everything was slowly coming together and it was really cool learning how to properly install everything. Once we got it in there it just looked brand new to me.. I was very impressed. We continued with the endless cam chain and crankshaft, cleaned the crankshaft mounting bracket and properly torqued the bolts into place. It was beginning to look like an engine again!!

After that we went to work on the lower crankcase. Meticulously cleaning the mating surface with a razor blade and installing new seals and the kick start mechanism. The mechanism was thoroughly cleaned and surfaces refurbished with a wire brush and sanding paper.

Then there was nothing left to do but THOROUGHLY inspect everything inside the engine, apply the liquid gasket and get these case halves back together and sealed up! We busted out the brand new stainless steel bolts and were blown away by the contrast against the black cases.. I can visualize the engine in my mind and I think it's going to look spectacular! He explained that a good method for putting in the crankcase bolts was to set everything aside in their pairs. Then apply with anti-seize and place them into their appropriate slots. If one of the bolts stuck out too far from it's hole then you know you messed up somehow.. Similarly if it didn't reach the threads it was time to rethink something.

We torqued the new stainless steel bolts to the specifications of the manufacturers recommendations instead of to that of what the manual said. The stainless, aftermarket bolts don't need as much torquing as the factory bolts by about a footpound or 2. We weren't too worried about this and went with the recommendation form the aftermarket bolt manufacturer.

When we got everything torqued down we flipped the engine over and I was just amazed with the results!! It looked like a brand new engine!! This is as far as we decided to take it and I will be back this coming weekend to finish up the top end and get this engine finished. I am just so excited to finally be at this stage of the build and I couldn't be happier. The bike is taking shape and it feels incredible after all the hard work I've been putting in.

I will be back with a new episode of Saturday's Wrench in the next week or 2.. Christmas is a busy time but I really want to get it out because it was really informative for me and I really think you guys are going to love it!

Until next time, thanks for your interest!






Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 10, 2015, 18:16:52
Here is some before and after pics of the painting process. More pics to come of the top end, as I just finished painting it last night.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Dec 10, 2015, 18:57:53
He took my starting clutch apart and inspected it thoroughly, noting that I would need to replace the rolling pins in the clutch. I inspected them myself and would suggest the replacement if you haven't in awhile. The pins can become warped causing the starting clutch to slip.

Worn roller pins can also cause the starting clutch to STICK. When that happens, you're riding along spinning the starting motor and severely wearing it out. I can hear in an instant if the clutch is stuck, but most people are unfamiliar with what sounds are usual for these bikes and wouldn't particularly pay it any mind. FYI, it sounds like a whirring sound, think of an electric drill being forced around by your engine. Unless you've been there before, again, it can be hard to make out.

Before that though he soaked the new cam chain in motor oil, said it was good practice. I like this guys style. He thoroughly cleaned off the grease that was on it when we took it out of the package. I can't remember what he called it but I think it was something like "packing grease" or something.. Maybe storing grease. I don't know but he wiped that crap off and we soaked the chain while we prepped the rest of the parts for the lower half of the engine.

Packing (or storing) grease doesn't make for a good lubricant. It is intended to be a rust preventative and does a fine job of displacing moisture. Problem is that most are composed of wax! Not easy to clean and not good for lubrication. Wax will not be dissolved by acetone/carb cleaner! You'll find that ordinary vegetable oil or mineral spirits works well. Put it into a tub-full and use a nylon brush to slough the wax off as it dissolves. Then soak the chain in the same type of motor oil you intend to run in the engine. This is the same process for new drive chains. Unfortunately, most are unaware and run them without cleaning. Even professional bike shops here will slap them on and send you out the door.

That crap smells like the cosmoline I used to get on the old WWII rifles I had. Serves its purpose but really must be removed.

On the subject of soaking parts in oil, you'll need to do the same for the friction plates of your clutch. Soak them for at least a few hours. Don't worry about the metal discs, it's the fibrous plates that need to soak the oil in to properly stick and cool.

Take a playing card, lick it, and stick it on your forehead. The wet clutch works in the same way. It won't stick to the plates if it ain't good and wet.

The black case looks mean as. Be prepared to hold your breath every time you crack a bolt off or test for fuel line leaks  ;D
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 10, 2015, 20:02:10
On the subject of soaking parts in oil, you'll need to do the same for the friction plates of your clutch. Soak them for at least a few hours. Don't worry about the metal discs, it's the fibrous plates that need to soak the oil in to properly stick and cool.

Take a playing card, lick it, and stick it on your forehead. The wet clutch works in the same way. It won't stick to the plates if it ain't good and wet.

The black case looks mean as. Be prepared to hold your breath every time you crack a bolt off or test for fuel line leaks  ;D

Ok thanks man, I was also unaware of the clutch friction plates needing a good soaking.

haha and ya, I hear you man. At least it'll look pretty for a little bit!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Kcomrie71 on Dec 11, 2015, 10:00:25
Looking forward to the video - that engine is looking -Cherry-! Excellent job!  8)

-K
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Habanero52 on Dec 11, 2015, 11:21:20
There is no way you are a WWII Vet, Vietnam yes.
By the way, Cosmoline is still made an that is great stuff for preserving metal parts for storage.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Dec 11, 2015, 11:40:23
There is no way you are a WWII Vet, Vietnam yes.

No bro, I literally beat up Hitler. I still live with that regret every day. He was a pretty güd guy.

Obviously it would be impossible for me to have owned surplus military rifles if this were not true.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 11, 2015, 11:45:33
 ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Habanero52 on Dec 11, 2015, 11:48:39
Interesting!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: DohcBikes on Dec 11, 2015, 12:13:24
Soaking clutch plates for any more than ten minutes is a waste of time.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: NoRiders on Dec 11, 2015, 12:22:56
Well, I just spent, no, invested an hour to read through your thread and I have to say I'm impressed. At first I thought you'd be like some who have big dreams and very little ambition. You've proved you have staying power and determination to see your project through, well done young man.

Video/editing appear to be pro standard, are you involved in the media in some way?

I'm very much looking forward to seeing the bike come together and will be checking in regularly from now on.

Makes my project seem like a weekender's dicking about haha!

Best wishes from Old Blighty - Colin
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Luugo86 on Dec 11, 2015, 13:28:52
 Some very nice work rebuilding those cases, the transmission, etc. I wish I was able to split and rebuild cases that well. Build is looking good.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Luugo86 on Dec 11, 2015, 13:30:18
No bro, I literally beat up Hitler. I still live with that regret every day. He was a pretty güd guy.

Obviously it would be impossible for me to have owned surplus military rifles if this were not true.

 lol
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 11, 2015, 13:50:50
Well, I just spent, no, invested an hour to read through your thread and I have to say I'm impressed. At first I thought you'd be like some who have big dreams and very little ambition. You've proved you have staying power and determination to see your project through, well done young man.

Video/editing appear to be pro standard, are you involved in the media in some way?

I'm very much looking forward to seeing the bike come together and will be checking in regularly from now on.

Makes my project seem like a weekender's dicking about haha!

Best wishes from Old Blighty - Colin

Thank you for the kinds words. I really appreciate that. This has probably been one of the most challenging and time consuming things I have done in my life and now that I am finally seeing it come together it feels incredible. I will probably tear up when I start the bike up for the first time haha.. Yes I work in the post production industry as a motion graphics designer with a strong background in shooting/editing. 

Anyway thanks again Colin and good luck with your project too man!

Some very nice work rebuilding those cases, the transmission, etc. I wish I was able to split and rebuild cases that well. Build is looking good.

Thanks but I owe it all to Jeff Busche, the mechanic who is helping/guiding me through the rebuild. He would not accept anything else but 100% clean! Anyway thanks for the sentiment!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Dec 30, 2015, 13:06:40
Happy Holidays everyone!

Here's the 1st video from a 3 part series of my engine rebuild. There is a lot of excellent info in this one! This is an insightful video and I recommend you watching it if you're thinking of just slapping your engine together. A lot of stuff needs to be inspected and this insightful guide will shed some light on what you need to look for. Obviously common sense to some but not for us rookies. Hope you like it!

https://youtu.be/CKbLNdc_f0I

I'll should be back soon with the bottom end video. We are awaiting on some gaskets to come in from Bore Tech, but since it's the holidays the packages are taking their sweet time!!

Until next time! Happy New Year guys!!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jan 19, 2016, 15:03:24
Hey guys, just a quick update!

The bottom end is finally assembled and finished. It is looking sweet!! Super clean and ready to roll. I was really excited to see it come together and after watching the mechanic I'm confident I could do another one myself, no problem.

Here is the video of the bottom end assembly:
https://youtu.be/Gme9yClDPJU


The top end is coming along.. slowly but surely. We ran into a number of walls with it but it is to be expected when doing a full engine rebuild. I did not have the proper head gasket for my big bore piston size and was under the impression that it would've come with the gasket kit I purchased at the time when I purchased the big bore piston. So if you ever buy the big bore kit, make sure you buy a larger head gasket that will fit the larger sized pistons. Probably common sense for more experienced builders, but completely went over my head. Once you change one component in the engine it will effect all the other components down the line.

We are at the stage where we have dry assembled the top end completely. We basically mocked up the assembly without the piston rings on the pistons and light weight springs on the valves. We left those components out so that we could turn the engine over easily, allowing us to measure our clearances. I will get into details more when I post the video for that but not for a few weeks since it's not finished yet. I am heading back this Saturday to wrap everything up and then will get to work on editing the video.

I am also planning on building the forks and installing everything into the swing arm so that is all ready to put together. I picked up my wheels from the wheel builder over the holidays and they are all trued up and balanced with the sweet new Avon AM26 rubbers installed.. Looking so damn nice!! Can't wait to show you guys. After the engine is finished up I am hoping to get everything together pretty quickly. I've been hording parts the last month in anticipation for the engine completion and have a good stock pile to get me pretty far in the next few months! I am giving myself a mid March deadline to finish, so the hustle is on!!

I'll be back with the next video and an update soon!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Feb 02, 2016, 13:14:37
IT'S UPDATE O'CLOCK

So I can finally sleep at night.. The engine is buttoned up!! Exciting times friends. We finally finished up last weekend and all I have to do now is install the clutch, oil pump and filter and other small items. Rebuilding this engine was quite the process. It took a lot longer than I thought it would as it was a bit distracting having the cameras around and trying to film and explain as we went along. Either way it's done and I have learned a lot in the process! These engines are truly fascinating and I can confidently say I am fully familiar with how the whole thing works and every little part that contributes to its function. It makes me feel good that I will know how to repair or fix any problems that may arise in the future, but hopefully it won't come to that.

So enjoy a write up and some pictures for now, I should have the video up in the next few weeks! Keep in mind that the process your about to read was particular to my personal situation because I have over sized pistons (67.5mm BoreTech Big Bore Pistons), a cam shaft with larger lobes (#12320-RG Cam) and upgraded Kibblewhite valves and springs.

I'll try to quickly explain what we did and why things took longer than expected as best I can. Firstly, during assembly we figured out that I did not have the correct head gasket. That's a pretty big wall to hit. I had to order one and it took nearly 3 damn weeks to arrive due to the amount of packages the flood the post office over the holidays. While awaiting that, we discovered that a few other parts inside the engine were worn and needed to be replaced. This included the o-rings for the rocker arm pins, the rubber cam chain guide and the 2 little rubber pieces that hold the cam chain tensioner in place at the base of the cylinders.

After that hiccup we were off to the races! Jeff Busche, the mechanic that helped me with the rebuild noted that we needed to "dry assemble" the engine in order to complete a list of tasks that needed to be preformed to ensure the engine would operate safely and not blow up as soon as I hit the start button. These tasks included many clearance checks to make sure all of the performance parts would play nicely with each other. It also meant that we would assemble the whole top end without the piston rings and heavy duty valve springs. Without these components, the engine turns over with ease making our work a lot easier. The documentation that came with the high performance parts also indicated and warned us to complete these checks. I can guess that some of you will tell me that we wasted our time or that some of these tasks were unnecessary for everyday riding but as a licensed mechanic, Jeff has a reputation to uphold and it's my money and safety on the line, so I was more than happy to go through the process.
(http://_MG_7234.JPG)

The 1st check we needed to complete was the deck height or piston to head clearance. This is the top of the squish band on the piston to the deck of the cylinder head:
(http://p110977_image_large.jpg)

WTF is piston deck height & why does it even matter?! "Piston deck height is a VERY important measurement to consider when designing a combustion chamber. Piston deck height is a major player in determining the squish clearance of an engine. The squish action within a combustion chamber is very important in the combustion process and power making process. Squish clearance is the distance from the edge of the piston, at TDC, to the outer edge of the combustion chamber's squish band. So, one can easily see how the piston deck height effects the squish clearance measurement." Read more here: http://www.2strokeheads.com/tech1.htm

Our minimum recommend clearance was 0.030" and with the base gasket I had, we only had about 0.015”. Our solution was to double up the base gaskets to raise the jugs up, effectively gaining more space between the top of the piston and cylinder deck. After all was said and done we achieved approximately 0.035" of deck height, slightly higher than our recommendation. This satisfied both of us and after some deliberation we decided to move on.

We realized that the cam shaft would not fit into the stock cam sprocket so Jeff took the dremel to the inner cam sprocket window and removed a tiny amount of material so that there was JUST enough clearance to fit the larger lobes through. We practised putting the cam through the sprocket a bunch of times outside of the engine but still had a HECK of a time with it once we got to the point when we needed to install it into the cam box. It seriously took us about 30 minutes or so.. it was stressful but funny. All I can recommend to you is to be as patient as possible. Once we DID get the cam to slide through the sprocket we struggled to fit the side covers onto the cam box like CRAZY! The new cam chain and tensioner were super tight and theres barely any room but we did it eventually. We didn’t torque the top bolts with stacks of washers but did tighten them quite significantly. We probably struggled with this for an hour at least! Jeff used this “lady foot” pry bar to help him lift the cam upwards as we slipped the tach cover on.. it was nuts! I honestly didn’t think it was going to work out and I was scouring the internet for solutions. Found a bunch on here and emailed/called a few experienced 350 builders for advice too! Thanks guys. Either way we did not have to shave any rubber off the sprocket. Once we did get the cam and side tach/points covers in place we rotated the engine a bunch to get the chain to work itself into place and get familiar with everything so that when we did the final assembly it would be easier.

We disassembled my cylinder head and replaced the heavy duty valve springs with light weight springs. The reason for this was to be able to easily measure valve to piston clearance and proper cam to crankshaft relationship. The light weight springs allow easy movement in the valves, yet hold them in the closed position as they normally function during engine operation. Now I FULLY realize that most people simply stick some clay or solder onto the valve pocket in the piston and rotate the engine forcing the valve to squish the material onto the piston head and measure that, but Jeff had his method and who was I to argue. Jeff replaced the springs and we installed the head and measured that when any piston and any valve were at a point when they were the closest they would ever be together inside the engine, they had at least 0.035" to go before they would connect with each other. Basically we rotated the engine and watched the piston and valve through the spark plug hole, when the 2 were at a point in the engine rotation where they were the closest they would ever be to each other we took our measurement from there. Hopefully that is making sense to those who've never done this before. We mounted a dial gauge to the top of the engine and measured from the valve steam head and pushed down until it touched the top of the piston. This was approx 0.095” of travel and our minimum clearance was 0.060". Another successful task completed.

Next we needed to ensure that the relationship between the cam shaft and the crankshaft was correct. On the task list that Jeff wrote out he described this as “Degree cam check”. I will try my best to explain it as I understand it but basically when the crankshaft is at a certain degree of rotation the camshaft should be pushing the valves open or closing them to a specific distance. They provide the distance on the timing card that comes with the camshaft. Here is what mine looks like:
(http://Megacycle Cam timing card 12320L.jpg)

As one example, It states that at exactly 0.040” of lift for the intake valve the crankshaft should be 37 degrees BEFORE top dead center (BTDC). To read exact degrees of rotation we attached a degree wheel onto the end of the crankshaft and set it so that 0 degrees marked top dead centre (TDC) for the left cylinder of the compression stroke. How we did this was by screwing a special stopper into the spark plug hole. It was a long piece of black metal that came to a rounded point and how it works is that you rotate the crankshaft so that the piston is coming up to TDC, then screw in your stopper and continue to rotate the crankshaft slowly until the piston comes up and makes contact with the stopper and stops. Set your degree wheel at something like 30 degrees BEFORE top dead center and fix it to the crankshaft so it moves simultaneously . We also fixed a piece of copper wire onto the engine and used it as a pointer so we could accurately read the degrees. Now, with the degree wheel fixed to the crankshaft, remove the stopper and continue to rotate the crankshaft in the same direction as before so that the piston comes to up to TDC and then continues downward in the cylinder. You will notice that the degree wheel will show that the degrees are counting down towards zero then move past zero and start to count up again, indicating the piston has passed TDC. Once the piston is sufficiently out of the way, put the stopper back in and carefully rotate the crankshaft in the reverse direction this time (back towards 0 on the degree wheel), so that the piston moves back upwards in the cylinder towards TDC and bumps into the stopper. Look at the degree wheel and notice that it will be close to 30 degrees AFTER top dead center (ATDC). What you are looking for is an EXACT number on either side of the ZERO mark on the degree wheel for when the piston bumps into the stopper. I’m using 30 degrees as a jumping off point but in my particular case it was 33.5 degrees on either side exactly. It’s hard to explain without a visual and I hope to make an animation in my next video but the EXACT middle of the 2 values is 0 degrees and that is how you know EXACTLY that your piston is at TDC and your readings are correct as long as your degree wheel doesn’t slip. Once the degree wheel was set up we could find 37 degrees BTDC easily. We moved the crankshaft until the intake valve on cylinder #1 was closed and attached our dial gauge to the top of the valve stem. As we approached 37 degrees BTDC the valve started opening & sure enough when the crankshaft was approximately at 37 degrees BTDC the valve was open 0.040”. It may have been a degree off but we were both pretty satisfied and attested the minuscule discrepancy to human error or set up errors and decided to move on. 1 degree is not the end of the world.
(http://_MG_7379.JPG)

Hopefully you’re still with me here, I’m doing my best to keep it quick while explaining my experience so that it makes sense. We did this check for each valve & also did a valve keeper to seal check and a spring coil bind check to make sure that the camshaft didn’t bind the spring coils before it finished it’s full rotation. We checked end gap for all piston rings and finally the piston to cylinder clearance. All good in the hood! Thorough! We finished ALL these checks, dismantled the top end and began the final assembly.

You can see now why it took us longer than we thought, but I am glad we completed all these checks. We struggled a bunch with getting the piston rings into the cylinders and with sliding the camshaft through the sprocket for some reason. No matter how many times we practiced, it still would slide together easily! The points/tach cover went on a lot easier this time and once we properly lubed everything up and rotated the engine a complete turn to do one last final check we buttoned up the top and torqued everything into place!!

Let me tell you that a huge weight feels like it has been lifted from my shoulders. The engine rebuild seemed like a mountain of a task for me but after watching Jeff work I can confidently say that I could definitely build one myself next time and just may do that for practice and to have a spare on hand. It was really a lot of fun working with Jeff at Busche’s Garage and I learned a lot from the experience. Moving forward I will adopt his techniques and hopefully become better at this stuff.. I already feel like I’m a lot more organized in my approach to the build.

I am looking forward to finishing the engine up and installing everything on the sides and getting it mounted into the frame. I will hopefully be doing that soon and getting started on building up the frame from there! Pretty excited about everything.. Spring is coming! Back to the grind!!

Sorry for the novel & I apologize in advance if I made an errors with explaining this stuff. 8)


Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Kcomrie71 on Feb 02, 2016, 13:36:19
Great job and excellent detailed coverage! And for my money's worth, the time invested in all of those pre-checks will pay back at least 10-fold in time spent riding trouble free with that new powerplant humming away between your legs. Errmmm....  :o

Looking forward to the vid.

Cheers!
Kirk
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: speedmotoco on Feb 02, 2016, 15:58:13
Nice job!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Redliner on Feb 18, 2016, 19:30:35
I only have this tip based on what I read: do not install the cam chain tensioner until the camshaft is installed and indexed properly...
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Feb 19, 2016, 14:25:48
Nice job!
I only have this tip based on what I read: do not install the cam chain tensioner until the camshaft is installed and indexed properly...
Great job and excellent detailed coverage! And for my money's worth, the time invested in all of those pre-checks will pay back at least 10-fold in time spent riding trouble free with that new powerplant humming away between your legs. Errmmm....  :o

Looking forward to the vid.

Cheers!
Kirk

Thanks guys! :)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Feb 19, 2016, 14:33:25
I finally finished up the video and posted it this afternoon. I hope those of you who are just learning this stuff like me can get something out of the video.. well I'm sure you will actually. It's a lot longer than my usual stuff but it was a 30+ hr process with checking clearances, running into walls and assembling 2 times.

Either way I hope you enjoy the process video and some pics:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IkQ1KZlf3DM

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: redwillissuperman on Feb 19, 2016, 14:46:43
Did you make a slotted cam gear?
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Feb 19, 2016, 15:02:44
Did you make a slotted cam gear?

Using a degree wheel, we verified that the cam was set up correctly with the stock sprocket and determined that it was unnecessary.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: yorkie350 on Feb 20, 2016, 06:48:21
All round ace build thread  8) , cool video of the engine rebuild great Saturday morning  watchin as its another wet day here in UK, Jeff's a great guy wish there was more like him this side of the pond most round here just after makin a quick buck keep going mate lovin it  ;) ;)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Feb 22, 2016, 14:46:39
All round ace build thread  8) , cool video of the engine rebuild great Saturday morning  watchin as its another wet day here in UK, Jeff's a great guy wish there was more like him this side of the pond most round here just after makin a quick buck keep going mate lovin it  ;) ;)

Cheers Yorkie! Yes, I was very lucky to find him. Thanks for the sentiment mate!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Feb 22, 2016, 14:48:02
Hey guys,

I really needed some advice and thought I would reach out here. Can someone give me a quick guide to wiring up the bike so I can fire up this engine before I get too much further? What do I need exactly to run the engine and go through a few gears? Mostly I am looking for the electrical part of this equation. I really just want to get to the point where I set a few wires up to the battery, the throttle, carbs, coils, fuel, etc.. And fire it up, rev it, laugh like Tim 'The Tool Man' Taylor and piss my mum off to the point where she comes into the garage swearing in her Scottish accent and waving a broom at me.

I've been working on installing the front forks, swing arm and front controls but had to order a few copper washers here and there and am replacing my zerk fittings with a modern pair on the swing arm bolt. Things are heating up and I am getting really excited about this bike being completed! I need to get on the tank design ASAP and have the seat upholstered and do some rear shock measurements before I order a pair.

Oh! Another question. I have all the parts for my 520 chain conversion but the rear sprocket I bought did not come with mounting bolts. Am I to use the old mounting bolts from the stock sprocket? Are those even removable?

Thanks as always.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: chucklump on Feb 23, 2016, 00:07:43
Hey guys,

I really needed some advice and thought I would reach out here. Can someone give me a quick guide to wiring up the bike so I can fire up this engine before I get too much further? What do I need exactly to run the engine and go through a few gears? Mostly I am looking for the electrical part of this equation. I really just want to get to the point where I set a few wires up to the battery, the throttle, carbs, coils, fuel, etc.. And fire it up, rev it, laugh like Tim 'The Tool Man' Taylor and piss my mum off to the point where she comes into the garage swearing in her Scottish accent and waving a broom at me.

I've been working on installing the front forks, swing arm and front controls but had to order a few copper washers here and there and am replacing my zerk fittings with a modern pair on the swing arm bolt. Things are heating up and I am getting really excited about this bike being completed! I need to get on the tank design ASAP and have the seat upholstered and do some rear shock measurements before I order a pair.

Oh! Another question. I have all the parts for my 520 chain conversion but the rear sprocket I bought did not come with mounting bolts. Am I to use the old mounting bolts from the stock sprocket? Are those even removable?

Thanks as always.
Like stock setup?
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: goldy on Feb 23, 2016, 07:13:47
If all you want to do is hear it run, just clip the positive post of a battery to the coils and the negative post to the frame. As long as you have power to the coils, it ought to have a spark.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: redwillissuperman on Feb 23, 2016, 10:17:45
(http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160223/55c8d84e64471e430bf5999a293c2a7a.jpg)

If you run total loss off battery you don't even need the voltage regulator, just power to coils.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Feb 23, 2016, 13:06:59
Ok thanks a lot guys! Appreciate the feedback! :D
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Mar 07, 2016, 15:03:01
Engine is mounted!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zqVA_OA0QzA

Getting closer to a rolling chassis & things are heating up outside! Exciting times indeed. In my last session, as you can tell from the picture, I finished up the right side of the engine and bolted on the cover with the sweet new stainless steel bolts. I got the bolts from AlloyBoltz.com in case you were wondering. This was before I realized I could get them locally from my buddy Rob who runs Bullit Custom Cycles. Anyway, finishing up the side cover was a lot of fun since I was pretty comfortable putting it back together. I also installed my new Barnett clutch system, which I am excited to try. I know there are other clutch systems that will work in this engine but Barnett was recommended by an experienced 350 race bike owner so I decided to try them out. It's a good idea to upgrade the clutch system due to the extra power output from the upgraded components I have in the engine.

Mounting the engine was quite the process! I decided just to put it in the same way I took it out. After wrapping the frame in rags I attempted to install the engine with the help of my Dad. After a little bit of persuasion we got it in the frame but scratched up the top cover a little. I need to do some touch ups from the rebuild, so I'm not too worried. It also took a lot of time to get all the mounting bolts in place! I used a small crow bar to move the engine around and get them all through the holes. It was very frustrating. The paint also made it more difficult to move things around since those tiny clearances were even smaller now because of the coating of paint. We did it eventually though and got her all torqued up and sitting pretty!

Enjoy some pics and a video for now! Next time I hope to install the swing arm, forks & wheels onto the frame! Once that's all on place I am planning to start with the electrical and repairing the gas tank. I have also come up with a bunch of design elements that I am pretty excited about but will share with you all later.

Until next time, thanks for all the comments and answers to my questions. This really is a great community.

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: redwillissuperman on Mar 07, 2016, 15:07:23
Yeah
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: yorkie350 on Mar 07, 2016, 15:23:08
Sweeet mate I know that feeling you on the right side of the project now mate, warm weather and smiley riding face just round the corner . You won't be sorry you went for the Barnett clutch set up I use them and it makes all the difference , the pull in the lever feels a bit tougher but a good upgrade keep it up mate  ;)  8)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Mar 07, 2016, 15:32:40
Yeah

Jeahhhhh! haha where'd you find those leafs?

Sweeet mate I know that feeling you on the right side of the project now mate, warm weather and smiley riding face just round the corner . You won't be sorry you went for the Barnett clutch set up I use them and it makes all the difference , the pull in the lever feels a bit tougher but a good upgrade keep it up mate  ;)  8)

Cheers Yorkie!!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: redwillissuperman on Mar 09, 2016, 00:47:12
Part of the Cdn keyboard option. But does come with downsides- all the keys are sticky with Maple Syrup, autocorrect always suggests "John A. MacDonald" and you only get 74 words for every 100 you type.

But every time you write "beanie" it changes it to "toque" 
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Mar 09, 2016, 11:22:56
Part of the Cdn keyboard option. But does come with downsides- all the keys are sticky with Maple Syrup, autocorrect always suggests "John A. MacDonald" and you only get 74 words for every 100 you type.

But every time you write "beanie" it changes it to "toque" 

 ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D

That was quite clever and hilarious.. well done! lol
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Mar 24, 2016, 19:21:09
Hey guys.. Looking for some help please

So I'm taking a few days off this week to put in some extra work on the bike and get things rolling. I've built my wheels and had some questions about some problems I'm having and things I'm concerned about.

For one thing there is some space in the front axel bolt that I can't remember if it was there in the beginning or not. More specifically, the axel bolt in the front wheel is sliding left and right by about 15-20mm or so. Can you please look at the pics below and tell me if that space is supposed to exist on the right side of the wheel where the speedo mechanism is? In the reference picture I took before I dismantled the bike I noticed that the left bolt sits right under the wheel catch, so I know I have to push the bolt all the left in order for that piece to sit there, but on the right when I do that it creates a lot of space as seen below. Is this normal? What am I missing?

pic #1: You can see the space here

pic #2: Then I can move the speedo mechanism slong the bolt, is this normal?

pic #3: Is the bolt supposed to stick out this far on the right side?




Also...

So I am doing a 520 chain conversion and I have the chain and 2 sprockets all in 520. When I installed the rear sprocket there is some space missing now since the new sprocket is thinner than the stock one. I had to use washers after I put the sprocket side plate on (#3 in fiche) in order to get the bolts to properly tighten on to the drive pins. But! The missing space is causing the 70mm washer (#2 in part fiche) to not sit tight up against the circlip like it usually does. See pic below. Any thoughts?? I can imagine this is a good thing. The drive pins are not being forced into the hub and I can't imagine this is very safe...

pic #4-5: see that 70mm washer I am pointing to? That should be sitting snug against the circlip.

Am I missing some sort of washer that's supposed to come with a kit or something? I did not buy a kit, 2 sprockets together then a chain separately. Anyone ever deal with this? How did you compensate for the missing space?

Please help.


Thanks as always!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: DrJ on Mar 25, 2016, 21:07:32
You didn't show a pic of the other side of the front axle where the nut is. BTW the axle nut goes in shoulder first, there are no threads at the shoulder and it recesses past the threads on the axle and snuggles down on the hub. As for the rear sprocket, the thickness of the sprocket at the inside should be the same as a 530, usually only the teeth are machined down to 520 thickness. You can see that in the photo of my 520 set.

(https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/v/t1.0-9/224380_10150266586077674_1575220_n.jpg?oh=01c1d62195893750e1e51eaa81330dff&oe=5798F073)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Apr 01, 2016, 12:14:30
You didn't show a pic of the other side of the front axle where the nut is. BTW the axle nut goes in shoulder first, there are no threads at the shoulder and it recesses past the threads on the axle and snuggles down on the hub. As for the rear sprocket, the thickness of the sprocket at the inside should be the same as a 530, usually only the teeth are machined down to 520 thickness. You can see that in the photo of my 520 set.

(https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/v/t1.0-9/224380_10150266586077674_1575220_n.jpg?oh=01c1d62195893750e1e51eaa81330dff&oe=5798F073)

Thanks for the response btw!

I did not show a pic of the left side of the front axle because I know exactly how it sits due to the reference pictures I took before dismantling it. For some reason I failed to take a picture of the right side where the speedo mechanism is, so I am unsure how it's supposed to sit in the hub. I just don't remember it poking out like it does in my picture above.

Can anyone post a close up picture of the right side of there installed front wheel for me please on a CB350? I am having a hard time locating one online for some odd reason.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Apr 01, 2016, 13:38:59
If you read above you'll know that last wk I took some time off work to get things moved along more quickly with the project. I ran into a bunch of frustrating walls that I would like to share with you guys. I've always stated that in no way do I know what I'm doing with this. I mean that in the sense that I've never done this before and my experience in the garage is limited. I'm not completely clueless and I always do my homework before I tackle something on the bike. I try to keep it to one or two things at a time or I feel like my head will explode.. Like how to rebuild forks with aftermarket parts and figure out oil measurements and spring preload. I'm not going to lie.. I probably put my forks together 3 times and still need to go back and do it again this wknd because I did not measure my preload properly.

I guess my point is that if you're a noob like me and you're reading this.. heck! Even if you're an intermediate mechanic you will level with me that this stuff can be complicated but approach it with an open mind, ask a lot of questions and most importantly; Don't get discouraged if you mess something up or don't accomplish what you set out to do. I bet every guy/girl in here can attest to leaving the garage and sitting there in bed at night when suddenly you get a light bulb moment and you figure out the way something goes together or how to wire that rectifier or how that wheels goes back together..

I hit a bunch of walls this week with getting my wheels on, with getting my carb boots to fit, my spark plug threads got damaged, I screwed up my fork rebuild, my aftermarket top triple clamp is too thick and I need to get it machined and I figured out that I bought the wrong throttle! weee! But I'll get back in there! I'm climbing that ladder! I was super discouraged and then bounced back and have some new life in me to make things right. Anyway, I just wanted to share that on here because I think it's important to share experiences on here so people can learn from them. My advice is to just inspect your aftermarket parts thoroughly, be skeptical and just make sure it all goes together properly but don't expect it to!

So here is where I'm at:
- Figured out how to properly measure my fork spring preload, will do that tonight and rebuild the forks
- Sending the top clamp back to get machined, will also double and triple check my all balls tapered steering bearing install to make sure I didn't muck that up (that may be causing the problem)
- I'll mod my carb boots with a dremel to elongate the mounting holes so they will line up properly with the cylinder head and use a small washer for extra hold
- I've pretty much figured out the spacing issue on my rear 520 sprocket, just need to add a second washer to fill in the space
- In the meantime I need to redesign my battery box (happy days!) because I did a mock up with my electrical components and there's not enough space in it... Battery Box for sale!! (anyone??)
- once the triple clamp comes back I can mount the wheels and install the exhaust
- after that's done I can quick wire up the bike and fire it up! Or, I may just finish the electrical all together.. THAT will be a journey!
- tank has been stripped of all paint, rust inside will be dealt with next wk and a few dents will be repaired using Bondo
- tank paint designs have been in the works and I have a pretty unique colour I'm thinking about.. probably won't reveal that until the very end ;D

Onward and upward friends! 8) :D
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: yorkie350 on Apr 01, 2016, 19:07:24
Know that feeling mate ??? keep at it she will get finished and top notch too 8) if it was all so simple everyone would be at it and mystical smoke would be out the bottle  :-X she gonna be a head turner when done for sure  ;)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Habanero52 on Apr 05, 2016, 14:41:09
Persistence and patience.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Apr 08, 2016, 17:55:51
 Some pics and video for you guys. Enough novel writing haha.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qfzoD-I7JfA


Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Green199 on Apr 08, 2016, 18:05:52
God damn, as I said on instagram last week but it needs reiterating....the rims and tyres look mega! Keep up the good work! 
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Apr 21, 2016, 14:33:00
God damn, as I said on instagram last week but it needs reiterating....the rims and tyres look mega! Keep up the good work! 

Cheers bud!!


Just a quick update this wk!

Feeling pretty good about everything with the project. The top clamp is still off at the machinist/anodizer but I'm really hoping it will show up in the next few days! I am dying to get this frame rolling and slap those beauty wheels on to see how she looks on legs!

Things have been a bit random on the build. I have been trying to complete odd jobs until I can continue on the straight path but things like this are never straight and that's what makes them awesome and life changing! My brain likes to work down a certain path and I've been feeling a little frazzled lately due to the fact I have hit some walls and it's forced me to stray from said path. There is a certain succession to things with my particular build. I can't install the wheels until I install the forks, until I install the top clamp, etc etc.. Things like that. I have a feeling though soon things will go well from here on out.

I got the spacers sorted out for the Race Tech springs in the forks. It turned out I needed at 20mm preload spacer in order to give the spring a 15mm preload (as recommended by the manufacturer). I can always visit this measurement later once I get a few test drives in. I also went ahead and installed the carb boots and mikuni vm30s onto the engine. They look very sweet I must say. I used a dremel to elongate the mountain holes on the boots to make them fit the cylinder head perfectly. I finished 1/2 of my throttle cable until I realized I had the wrong throttle. I got a single pull throttle and will finish installing that this weekend or whenever the top clamp decides to show up. I will also route the cable properly since as you will see in the pics/video that I do not have it set up properly.

I also installed the rear wheel to measure the distance at which the tire will make contact with my custom seat pan at 9.625" or approx 244mm. Now I can give these measurements to a shock builder and get some rear shocks ordered. I am looking for a shock that will fully compress at a distance greater than when my wheel and seat make contact. A 1/2" or more should be enough when you factor in heat expansion. So a shock that fully compresses at 10.1" or more should be good for my application. Now, in my research I have only found a few shocks that are suitable for my particular application. Hagon makes a shock that is 335mm or 13.2" standard length that fully compresses at 10.2", but is not height adjustable. Gazi also makes a shock that is 330mm (approx 13") with a 5mm adjustable height that can be modified for me to fully compress at 10.2". I personally like the look of the Hagon much better but am a bit worried about the standard height (13.2") when stock height is 12.5". My question is: How much will a 0.7" difference affect steering? Will it possibly make it too nimble? Anyone have any experience with this ride height?

I want to get those ordered asap bc they take 3-6wks from Merry Old England. Both are good shocks in a good price range. If anyone has any other recommendations for twin rear shocks please let me know.

Other than that I may have solved the rear wheel issue or maybe not! lol I guess I have to wait until I put the chain on. Once I get that top clamp so many things will happen.

Here is where I am currently at:
- Starter motor has been fully disassembled and cleaned! it's looking awesome. Heading back to put it together this wknd
- Tank is currently sitting stripped with a belly fully of vinegar! Hoping this will eat up the rust inside. If not I guess I may have to splurge and buy a few liters of Metal Rescue
- Battery Box design is in full swing! I've measured everything up and have been drawing them out on the computer. I measured every single component that I plan to have sitting in the box and have been playing with set ups on the computer. This is not an easy task and I am really surprised my friend Rob and I even attempted to make one when I visited his shop last May! They take a lot of serious consideration. I will mock one up with cereal boxes and see how everything fits this wknd also

Until next time! I better get back to work.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Apr 21, 2016, 14:48:35
more pics..
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Apr 21, 2016, 14:52:57
even more! weee
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: CJDisaffected on Apr 25, 2016, 14:13:36
Hey how did you get your hands on a Probe Eng CB350 ignition? Those have been out of production for quite some time now.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Apr 25, 2016, 14:40:39
Hey how did you get your hands on a Probe Eng CB350 ignition? Those have been out of production for quite some time now.
Not too long actually.. I bought one last spring right before they discontinued them. I'm a bit nervous about the fact they did that but I read on their website that they will still honour warranty. Know much about them? I decided to get one after reading a few blog posts on their site about how they work and what they're capable of. I was impressed.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Fa$tFreddy100 on Apr 25, 2016, 15:27:59
Bikes looking great! I want to thank you. I'm currently working on a 1972 CB350. And I've been able to tear it down based on your video. You given me great insight into these bike. You definitely got a friend in Miami.

Thanks a Million!!!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Apr 25, 2016, 15:54:17
Bikes looking great! I want to thank you. I'm currently working on a 1972 CB350. And I've been able to tear it down based on your video. You given me great insight into these bike. You definitely got a friend in Miami.

Thanks a Million!!!
Awesome! Thanks for the shout out man. If I'm ever down there we can go for a rip and you can show me some beach spots where they serve good Cuban food.. I'm basing that solely on the show Dexter. Haha cheers man!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: advCo on Apr 25, 2016, 17:56:00
Those Avon's look killer with the white lettering. Keep up the good work  8)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: yorkie350 on Apr 25, 2016, 18:26:15
hey Tony better watch out for the "Bay harbour butcher" if ya go down there man haha :o
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Fa$tFreddy100 on Apr 28, 2016, 11:47:25
Awesome! Thanks for the shout out man. If I'm ever down there we can go for a rip and you can show me some beach spots where they serve good Cuban food.. I'm basing that solely on the show Dexter. Haha cheers man!

That sounds like a plan brother. You have any recommendations on where to get a nice brown leather style Brat Seat?
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Apr 28, 2016, 15:28:03
That sounds like a plan brother. You have any recommendations on where to get a nice brown leather style Brat Seat?
I've seen a few on the Dime City Cycles website. There's also Chappell Customs.. Tuffside makes some alright ones too.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: CJDisaffected on Apr 28, 2016, 18:10:24
Not too long actually.. I bought one last spring right before they discontinued them. I'm a bit nervous about the fact they did that but I read on their website that they will still honour warranty. Know much about them? I decided to get one after reading a few blog posts on their site about how they work and what they're capable of. I was impressed.

No need to be nervous, that's a sweet setup. It's my understanding that the cost of components made them basically impossible to manufacture profitably. I've never run one, but sure as shit would be grabbing one for the bike I am currently building if I could. :-)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Apr 28, 2016, 18:45:19
No need to be nervous, that's a sweet setup. It's my understanding that the cost of components made them basically impossible to manufacture profitably. I've never run one, but sure as shit would be grabbing one for the bike I am currently building if I could. :-)
Ya I had a good feeling they were nice little units. I'm excited to get it running! I'll do a full evaluation on it.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on May 01, 2016, 17:37:21
Over the past few weekends I have been working hard on getting the bike together. I thoroughly cleaned and rebuilt the starter & installed that on the front of the engine then installed the new coils into place. As some of you know the Rick's Coils do not come with a timing mark for some weird reason so you have to make your own. We did this at Busche's Garage when I was there getting my engine rebuilt. We simply installed the old coils, rotated the crank shaft to the LF or LT mark (either one will do), carefully removed the coils making sure not to move the rotor then installed the new coils and scratched a mark in the coil plastic where the timing mark was knowing it was perfectly aligned with the old mark. I then just took a fine tipped sharpie and got some ink in the scratch.

For the starter rebuild, ApexSpeeds post here (http://"http://www.hondatwins.net/forums/50-electrical-discussion/36378-cb-cl350-starter-rebuild.html") came in SUPER handy! Thanks again bud!!

All in all the process went pretty well. I did not have the proper tools to remove one of the bushings, so I left it. There were no visible signs of wear so I wasn't too worried about it. I also did not take the bearing part of the starter apart because I felt like I didn't need to. It's the part of the motor that actually sits inside your engine, where the chain from the starting clutch sprocket fits on to. After some inspection I felt that the part was in perfect working order and after having removed the circlip and it not coming apart naturally, I did not feel confident to force it apart.

I also did some other random things like installing the electronic ignition plate and polishing my cam chain tensioner unit.

Here are some pics and video of that process:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IELZjICbtHg

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Andyp on May 05, 2016, 15:02:34
Looking good Tone. ;)
Were at about the same place in our builds which is so cool.
I look forward to seeing your posts and vids as you seem to come across the same issues as me.  :) :)

Not sure if you've seen my build pics on here. Check them out if you've got time between photo and video shoots. :D
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on May 05, 2016, 15:04:40
Looking good Tone. ;)
Were at about the same place in our builds which is so cool.
I look forward to seeing your posts and vids as you seem to come across the same issues as me.  :) :)

Not sure if you've seen my build pics on here. Check them out if you've got time between photo and video shoots. :D
I didn't know you had a build thread brother!! Send me the link! Cheers mate.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Andyp on May 05, 2016, 15:45:58
http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=58093.0

Enjoy. ;)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: JadusMotorcycleParts on May 08, 2016, 08:03:13
Incredible attention to detail.  The rebuild of the starter motor is outstanding.  Thanks for sharing the process.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Tune-A-Fish© on May 08, 2016, 08:20:36
Well done, I would of got a new one... But not always available or in the budget so this is a super nice write up on a reman job.

Me thinks pull the starter reman segment and post it up in motors n shit as a starter specific how to  :o

TAF
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on May 10, 2016, 15:40:30
Incredible attention to detail.  The rebuild of the starter motor is outstanding.  Thanks for sharing the process.

Thanks! Apexspeed's post was crucial to the rebuild.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on May 10, 2016, 15:41:27
Well done, I would of got a new one... But not always available or in the budget so this is a super nice write up on a reman job.

Me thinks pull the starter reman segment and post it up in motors n shit as a starter specific how to  :o

TAF

Apexspeed's post on Hondatwins was definitely a big help, but I appreciate the kind words!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on May 10, 2016, 15:42:08
I've been working hard on some designs for the bike and wanted to get the forums opinion on these. Be honest.. Good feedback, negative feedback, I take it all.

Thanks!

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: snmavridis on May 10, 2016, 15:44:02
Get out of here and never come back.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: CALfeRacer on May 10, 2016, 16:04:18
With "MAGIC" as an option, I don't see how the other three even have a chance.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: ABCanuck on May 10, 2016, 16:11:02
Were you taking inspiration from pipeburn when you drew those?  Looks like something they would have featured the last couple months.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on May 11, 2016, 13:33:34
OBBBBBBBviously that was a huge joke. Thought I would have some fun with you guys. No one commented on the cigarette lighter headlight?! I think I need to patent that!!

Annnnnnyways, back to business!

Here is what has been going on with the good old CB350 build:

Rear sprocket spacing issue has been sorted, finally! I called the manufacturer of the sprocket, Sprocket Specialists in California, to ask if the gap was normal. He admitted that he had not dealt with a 350 in a long time and proceeded to tell me that they forgot to send me a spacer that was supposed to be installed behind the sprocket! It's called a 181 spacer for whatever reason and it is in the mail! It will sit behind the sprocket where the drive pins are, pushing the sprocket outwards, aligning it with the driver sprocket in the front. I am pleased with this solution as it will be a lot more safe than the washers I have in there now.

Top clamp came back from machining and anodizing from Cognito Moto and looks awesome! Fits a lot better now and I was able to get a good torque on the top clamp nut. I believe the torque spec on that is 50-80 ft/lbs. I also installed the front wheel for now and the old shocks just so I can see what it looks like.. was so impressed. Things are really starting to come together now and getting pretty fun!

Tank is cleaned inside & out, ready for paint! I'll go through the process in a separate post. I used a small dent repair kit from Bondo to fill out a few small dents in the tank and even though I had ZERO experience doing this before the instructions were straight forward enough and the results were really good.

It took me a few weeks and a couple revisions but I managed to come up with a nice little design for the electronics tray under the seat. I'll also go into more detail about that when I explain the gas tank process.

I ordered my rear shocks and rear sets, which are also in the mail. I decided on the IKON Dial-a-ride shocks after some deliberation and lots of research. There were a few factors which swayed my decision. The first being that adjustability of the shock, second being the reputation and third was the quality and colour combination. They are being made to my particular specifications and will fit my bike perfectly. I'll go into more detail in a later post when I get to installing them. As for the rear sets I decided on a set from Bullit Custom Cycles. The quality and price range were PERFECT & they are local so shipping was like $5 and no import/duty/exchange fees. I looked into Moto Bits and it was going to cost me about $450 CDN... For foot pegs!!!! Ummm.. no.

I also figured out the front wheel axel spacing issue. In a previous post I had stated that there was some extra room in the front wheel axel. Well.. I had the dang axel cap bolt on the wrong way! The hex side of it goes in towards the wheel. Anyway I realized this after carefully looking through my reference photos of the bike before I took it apart. I'll say this again, take lots and lots of photos before you disassemble! I don't know how I didn't see it on the fiche either. Anyway, that is sorted! Wheel is spinning straight and all is good.

So here is where I am currently at:
- Battery box is off getting welded, should get that this wk then I can start on electronics -- that will be a big challenge for me but looking forward to it
- seat is currently being upholstered, hopefully picking that up this wk also
- spacer for rear sprocket is also on it's way, hoping to get that sorted soon and can then install the chain
- tank is ready for paint, still undecided about paint design and may actually just fit the raw tank on for now to see how everything runs before getting it touched up
- once rear sets have shown up and are installed I can then properly set up my riding position, then I will know handle bar positions and can drill into them for button wiring
- I also need to start thinking about the front and rear fenders, my plan is to clean and slightly chop up the old ones to get a more custom and polished look

That's pretty much it for now. I've got a dang ROLLER on my hands! Woo!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQIR5SAA37I

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: BigNickel on May 11, 2016, 17:17:55
This is coming together so nicely!  8) You're at the stage where it all finally starts to visually come together. Loved going through your thread, the attention to detail is superb.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: snmavridis on May 11, 2016, 18:33:26
So shiny.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on May 19, 2016, 14:30:35
Time for another update!

Rear Sprocket Spacing issue CONTINUES:

The spacer for my rear sprocket showed up and I installed it onto the bike only to find that it was TOO THICK!! Will it ever end?! This sprocket issue just won't go away. I have been on the horn with Lance from Sprocket Specialists and he has been more than helpful! Really great customer service over there. After chatting for a bit he decided on 2 solutions; One is that he is going to send me a spacer that will make up the difference of the stock 530 sprocket thickness and the 520 sprocket thickness. I personally measured my stock 530 sprocket with a micrometer and got an approximate 8.7mm. The 520 Sprocket they sent me is approx 6.2mm, which makes a difference of 2.5mm. He told me that according to the information in his system, I was 0.6mm off and that the difference was 1.9mm. So this is what they are sending me and I will test it out.

The other solution is that they are going to send me a whole new sprocket and this time, instead of machining the entire surface to the width of the 520 sprocket, they're only going to mill out the area where the teeth lie and leave the face on the inside of the sprocket to the stock thickness of the 530 sprocket with the grooves in it for the t-shaped drive pins to sit in. I was worried about the drive pins with the spacer they sent me because it did not include the grooves for the drive pins. The teeth on this sprocket will be aligned perfectly with the drive sprocket since that is forced to the outside of the bike due to the bracket that holds it into place. This has all been a bit of a blessing in disguise due to the fact that the sprocket I originally ordered from them has 38 teeth. Stock is 36 on the CB350. For those that are unfamiliar with gearing ratios, going up in the rear will help with acceleration but hurt your top end speed. I honestly don't know what I was thinking when I ordered a 38 tooth sprocket. My engine will be pretty high reving to begin with and has significantly more power than a stock 350 engine. A 38 tooth sprocket is going to cause my engine to rev even higher and hurt my top end speed, which is like.. what's the point then?! That being said, going up 2 teeth isn't going to do anything drastic, but still. I think my train of thought was that I wanted a little easier acceleration when driving in the city due to the fact my engine will be a bit clunky at low speeds/rpms. Either way, I think a 34 tooth rear sprocket will be a good fit for my engine and riding style. I plan on getting this beast on a dyno at some point so hopefully I can do a quick sprocket swap and compare the values. That would be interesting! I would also like to do that with an X ring chain vs a heavy duty... but that's for another post altogether. 

BTW you can look up gear ratios online but I found a pretty easy way to think about it. Divide your rear sprocket tooth number by your front and you will get a value that tells you exactly how many rotations the front sprocket needs to take in order to rotate the rear sprocket/wheel once. So my stock ratio is 36/16=2.25 rotations. 38/16=2.34. With this ratio my engine has to rotate more in order to turn my rear wheel 1 time. More rotations = higher revs per minute. Easier to get off the line but will hurt overall speed. 34/16=2.13. So now my engine has to rotate less for one complete rotation. Anyway these values are not very drastic but will definitely make a small difference. Will I notice?! Maybe.. Am I racing?! haha who knows. Either way I'm learning and that's ok with me. Just thought I'd share because that's what this is all about.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTaG4vBEWns

Tank De-Rust & Dent Removal Process:

I started out with blowing the heck out of the inside with compressed air with all holes open. I fit in the old petcock, connected a cross flow tube and filled it with plain white vinegar with a few table spoons of table salt. It sat sealed for 7 days with me shaking it 2 or 3 times daily. 7 days is good, or it'll start eating through the tank at some point. I dumped the vinegar and filled with hot water and a few table spoons of baking soda to neutralize the acid.. Shake shake shake! Shake yo booty! Shake yo booty! I dumped and repeated the water filling for probably 30 or 45 minutes! The water coming out was so brown and pieces of rust were just blasting out.. it felt like it wouldn't end! I would fill with a few liters at a time and shook like an absolute mad man!! I really wish I had filmed this process because it would've been hilarious. After awhile the water became more and more clear. I blew it out with compressed air, re-sealed and put in some methal hydrate and let it sit there for about 30 mins or so. This stuff absorbs water and that is important in a gas tank. After another blow dry I was still not satisfied and decided to go with some Metal Rescue. After 36 hrs or so the tank came out sparkling!! It literally looks brand new. Whoever invented that stuff is a dang genius! It is safe to handle, re-usable, environmentally safe and works amazing! No flash rust either. Gold. I'm almost sure they're is some fountain of youth where they get it from.. I am almost tempted to drink it and see if my hair grows back. (I am seriously NOT suggesting you drink Metal Rescue to regain your loss youth). I also used a small dent repair kit from bondo to repair some dents in the tank and it worked out very well! A little elbow grease but it was well worth it. Tank's ready for paint! I just need to commit to a design but I am really taking time to consider it.



Battery Box Process:

I am fitting quite a few items in my battery box so I started out by measuring all of them. I also measured the space in the frame and started planning on paper, then on the computer to scale. The battery box design was more complicated that I imagined and I can't believe that we hap-hazardly slapped something together when I got my rear seat hoop welded on. In my particular case, it really needed a lot of consideration. I played around with a lot of designs, then started fitting the components inside the box in different configurations until I came up with a good solution. As you can see form the process I came up with a shelf design and mocked it up using cardboard from cereal boxes and the like. I'm really happy I did this because I found that the wheel was making contact with the end of the box and had to hit the drawing board one more time. I also fit in all my components into the cardboard version to see if everything fit and it did, perfectly. Proper planning is so essential with stuff like this. The plans are all off getting welded up from a local shop here in Toronto called Back Alley Moto. I can't wait to see it! Once it's finished I'm going to need to get it powder coated so that will be a few weeks still. I'm patiently waiting for all this stuff so I can get going on the electrical!

Getting really close guys! Hopefully I can get in a few million rides this summer... I think I've earned it.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on May 19, 2016, 14:40:51
a few more pics:
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: snmavridis on May 19, 2016, 16:45:55
Neat!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: JadusMotorcycleParts on May 20, 2016, 04:41:11
Man wicked write ups.  Thanks for sharing in detail  :D
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Andyp on May 21, 2016, 05:07:20
Looking good Tony,
Have you thought about reducing the battery size? I found a battery called Anti-gravity battery. There super small and light.
This may give you more clearance under the seat.
Great mock up shots. Love the tank in bare metal. Shame you had to bond it. Would have looked sick plain brushed metal.
Keep wrenching" :)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: grcamna5 on May 21, 2016, 06:10:32
Nice work  :) subscribed
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: snmavridis on May 21, 2016, 17:14:51
Looking good Tony,
Have you thought about reducing the battery size? I found a battery called Anti-gravity battery. There super small and light.
This may give you more clearance under the seat.
Great mock up shots. Love the tank in bare metal. Shame you had to bond it. Would have looked sick plain brushed metal.
Keep wrenching" :)
The antigravity batteries are li-ion right?
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on May 22, 2016, 09:47:52
Looking good Tony,
Have you thought about reducing the battery size? I found a battery called Anti-gravity battery. There super small and light.
This may give you more clearance under the seat.
Great mock up shots. Love the tank in bare metal. Shame you had to bond it. Would have looked sick plain brushed metal.
Keep wrenching" :)
Thanks Andy.. too late for a battery swap at this point. The 4 cell looks about half the size of my Shorai though but I would have to research how it would work with my set up. I'm happy with the Shorai though, it's the same size as their 8 cell I believe and will work well with my set up.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jun 08, 2016, 17:02:17
It's been a few wks and I have been as busy as possible with the build. I mean that in the sense that not having certain parts are really slowing down my progress and points like this in a build can be very frustrating as I'm sure most of you guys on here can attest to!

Would you even believe me if I told you I am still having rear sprocket issues?! Well believe it!! I am having zero luck with this whole situation and it has all become quite frustrating. The guys at sprocket specialists sent me a sprocket like I said they would in my last update. They admitted the error in machining the entire surface of the sprocket. They have sent me a second sprocket with just the teeth and not the body machined down to the 520 thickness and the proper groves in the back of the sprocket for my drive pins to sit in, free of charge. And rightfully so! The original sprocket they sent me is absolutely useless without a bit of mill work. It took 3 and half weeks to show up because the border service in Canada kept it for processing for almost 2 weeks.. Not to the fault of S.S. but still annoying. A real bummer considering I could not complete a lot of tasks on the bike until I received that sprocket. It finally showed up yesterday and is absolutely NOT what I paid for. I paid for the sprocket to be lightened (holes machined throughout for weight reduction) and to be anodized in black. It showed up with no holes and in bare metal. I am less than impressed as you can imagine. I ordered this sprocket last November and it's taken this long to sort out. You can imagine my frustration, especially when I get flak for calling them out on the 3rd mistake. The owner got quite aggressive with me when I said it wasn't what I paid for. I admit I may have been a tad aggressive over the phone with them too but honestly... do you blame me?! I now have to take the sprocket to the shop this wknd to MAKE SURE it fits perfectly and then ship it back to them and wait all over again for them to lighten and anodize it and ship it back to me. I'll say no more and let you take from that what you will. Just sharing my experience.

In the meantime I have been doing what I can on the bike. So far I have assembled the front brake caliper, brake line and fitted the master cylinder onto the bars. It's all looking pretty sweet! I also have the clutch cover ready to go for when I get the sprocket, wheel and chain in place.

Before I can put the front wheel back on I need to start thinking about my front fender situation. My plan is to use my existing fender, clean it up and chop it down slightly. I really need to consider this because a fender that is too short is absolutely useless! I know from experience on my Virago. The fender was completely too short and would blast my coils with water anytime it rained or there was water on the road. This caused the coils to fail on numerous occasions! Not to mention the face full of road grit you receive on your face shield! Not worth it.. trust me. I will most likely just chop the front part a little shorter and leave the rear side to stock length. I might not look the coolest but it sure does serve a very good purpose and I do not want any water/electrical problems again. I will also need to de-rust and clean up some of the pitting on the surface. I'm sure there is a crap ton of videos on the youtube for this but if anyone has any advice I am an open book.

Tank is being dropped off at the painter this Friday! I am struggling very hard on 3 designs I have come up with.. probably over thinking it a little. I am very excited to see this tank and show you guys what I have come up with in the coming weeks.

Besides that I have been researching like an absolute maniac on how to wire this bike up and am VERY excited to say that I have crawled through a tunnel of Sh** and came out clean on the other side! I have learned so much about wiring and electrical and I cannot wait to get to that point in the build where I can share my knowledge with the people who find this part intimidating. I will save that for another update but my advice to those who find this intimidating is to literally start with a blank piece of paper and a pencil and draw your self a wiring diagram from scratch. I have done this and it worked out amazingly! Just draw out your components and start connecting them with lines.. You will learn a heck of a lot in a very short amount of time. The battery box has been fabbed up by a local moto shop called Back Alley Customs here in Toronto and it looks absolutely amazing!! I am dropping that off to get powder coated this evening and will share some pictures in the next update.

No other pictures or video yet and I am literally in mid process of shooting another episode while waiting for the sprocket situation to resolve itself. Hoping to get something out as soon as I get that sprocket in the coming weeks. While awaiting that I will probably start on the electronics and have that ready to go, so you may see that update sooner than later.

Thanks for your interest and for reading my novel length updates! I usually have a lot to say when I leave it for 2 or 3 weeks. This project has been quite literally life altering and I am getting closer and closer to completion.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Andyp on Jun 08, 2016, 17:29:24
Few, was that a bike post or a counciling session? sounds like you've not had it easy mate. It will be worth it in the end. I was worried about my electrics but as you said just go through it systematically and you'll be fine. I found some great diagrams on this forum so you won't be short of help. Are you using a moto gadget controller? Or reworking the stock loom?
Anyway keep your motivation up and things will soon come around.
Keep wewnchin'


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Kamn on Jun 08, 2016, 17:34:36
Tony dude,
nice update by the way.....I think you could have bought a mill, learned how to machine, and made yourself a new sprocket by now
Cool meeting you at the MotoSocial last week

And your post needs more pics

Cheers
Kameron
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jun 22, 2016, 17:28:03
Tony dude,
nice update by the way.....I think you could have bought a mill, learned how to machine, and made yourself a new sprocket by now
Cool meeting you at the MotoSocial last week

And your post needs more pics

Cheers
Kameron

 ;D ;D ;D lol!!
Hilarious... so true. Really great meeting you also, Kam! Hope we can go for a ride in the near future.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jun 22, 2016, 17:29:53
Few, was that a bike post or a counciling session? sounds like you've not had it easy mate. It will be worth it in the end. I was worried about my electrics but as you said just go through it systematically and you'll be fine. I found some great diagrams on this forum so you won't be short of help. Are you using a moto gadget controller? Or reworking the stock loom?
Anyway keep your motivation up and things will soon come around.
Keep wewnchin'


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

haha ya man, super frustrating stuff. Anyway, cheers! Using an m-unit so things are a lot easier on my end. Thanks man, hope you figured out what's been going on with your whip!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jun 22, 2016, 17:33:56
I basically gave up waiting around for the sprocket and wrapped up another episode if you're interested:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i1goZKfMeN8

Here are the most up to date happenings with the build:
- Tank design has been finalized & tank is in the hands of the painter! A place called S&S Paint Works as referred to by my buddy Rob from Bullit Custom Cycles. I feel really good about the young guy who owns the place! Will do a full profile on him in the future. Until then I am eagerly anticipating his sill set.
- Awaiting the return of this magical sprocket...
- Brake line is being assembled and will be in my hands by next week.
- Battery box is done! Looking really nice too. Some solid metal work by Paul Dutra of Back Alley Moto in Toronto (as seen below). Really cool to see my designs come to fruition and the shelving unit inside will be perfect for my particular application. Picked that up from powder coating last wknd and is all ready to go.
- Wiring diagram has been approved by none other than Stefan from Revival Cycles! Super excited to be emailing back and forth with him because he is a super talented bike builder/engineer. After making a whack of purchases from the site I emailed them to ask for help with hooking a few of the items up and Stefan was kind enough to really take me through the wiring diagram I had created. Really awesome guys over there at Revival and super cool of them to help me out with this. If you are unfamiliar with their work I would suggest checking them out as they have built some really amazing machines. Stefan also does these videos on YouTube called "Tech Talk with Revival Cycles" and I have learned quite a few things from them and would definitely recommend them to anyone! Either way I am excited to go through this diagram with those of you who find this sort of thing intimidating and shared what I have learned. This will be very particular to my build but has still given me a much better understanding of wiring a motorcycle.
- Chopped and cleaned up the front fender. Metal rescue to the rescue! That's the beauty of this stuff. I already had a whack of it from doing the tank and it's reusable! Gold, Jerry.
- Waiting on a few last minute electrical components to come in the mail (ground strap, crimping tools, etc) and then I'll be all set to start wiring this bad boy up!

Getting really close here. Feel the burrrrrrrrrnnnn!! 8)

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: grcamna5 on Jun 24, 2016, 10:31:12
Nice work you're doing there on your CB350G  :)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jun 24, 2016, 10:51:16
Nice work you're doing there on your CB350G  :)
Thank you sir!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: MattCB750OT on Jun 24, 2016, 12:29:03
Loving this!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: yorkie350 on Jun 28, 2016, 15:00:39
Great video /update as usual mate, sure gets you pissed when you get the run around with parts but gonna be spot on when done, some things are worth the wait got the same feeling with two years under my belt before my latest build was done, guess we're never done learning keep up the quality sure gonna be eye poppin when done look forward to ya next update as always
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jul 12, 2016, 10:53:40
Great video /update as usual mate, sure gets you pissed when you get the run around with parts but gonna be spot on when done, some things are worth the wait got the same feeling with two years under my belt before my latest build was done, guess we're never done learning keep up the quality sure gonna be eye poppin when done look forward to ya next update as always

Cheers for the kind words Yorkie! You're spot on though! Some things are worth waiting for and the learning never stops.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jul 12, 2016, 10:57:53
So just a quick update and seeking some advice from the electrical wizards of the forum if possible.

I did some odds and ends over the wknd and want to be ready for when the sprocket and electrical stuff show up so I can move forward with the build. I discovered that my left front fork seal was leaking! 1 step forward, 2 steps back. It seems as though in my haste to pop out the old seal I scraped the inner part of the fork tube with the flat head screw driver I used to pry it out and it's causing the oil to seep past. Huge rookie mistake on my part and now I am paying the consequences. It was really careless of me and now it needs to be repaired or replaced. I don't even want to explore replacing the fork boot as I've spent time and money polishing and clear coating the part. I feel as though I will be able to repair the fork boot though. I've sanded the inner diameter down just slightly and will use a light coating of JB Metal Weld and then lightly sand that back a little bit.. I'm hoping this will build the metal back slightly so the seal will fit more snugly into the top of the fork boot. If you guys have any other ideas, I'm all ears as usual.

Like I have stated in the past, in the meantime I've been perfecting my wiring diagram and sending it around to some real moto nerds to get their eyes on it. I was hoping some of you might be able to also take a look at it. I've posted it here and will also post it in the electrical thread for my particular model to start a fresh feed so it's easy to find as well and hopefully attract some other users who might not be interested to read about rookie bike builds. You can find the thread HERE (http://"http://www.hondatwins.net/forums/50-electrical-discussion/46274-custom-wiring-diagram-m-unit-install.html#post368924")

It took me some time to research and figure it out and I am quite proud of myself for over coming the obstacle. I am basically just looking for some advice when it comes to the gauge of wire for the ground strap. The guys at Sparck Moto who did my harness sent me out an 8 gauge wire for the ground but I'm wondering if a 6 gauge would be better? Any advice is appreciated.

I've called the guys at Sprocket Specialists and my sprocket was sent out last Thursday or Friday. I going to take the week off next week and do a marathon wrench session to get this project done! I'm crossing my fingers to be done for the 23rd so I can take it up to a motorcycle show called Freedom Machine (http://"http://www.freedommachineshow.com/") in northern Ontario. If you've never heard about it you should check it out! Come out and have a beer with me if you're in the area.

My box of final wiring supplies literally showed up as I was typing this so that is great news. It has some tools and heat shrink I ordered to finish the electrical job properly! Looking forward to wrapping this project up and doing lots of riding for the rest of the summer!! Hopefully I've covered all my bases.. we'll see I guess when I go to start the bike up. Excited and nervous at the same time. Positive vibes!

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: el barto on Jul 12, 2016, 11:21:23
Great thread - bike's looking good
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: MattCB750OT on Jul 12, 2016, 14:09:51
Your wiring diagram is saving me enormous amounts of time. I am doing Motogadget Pro, Switches, M-Button, and M-Unit as well however I am adding in the Dyna 2000, along with no alarm (you don't like the M-Unit alarm?). So it's almost identical - thank you!

- Shouldn't the fuse be located between the battery and the M-unit? Rather than after?
- Are you going to run grounds to your handlebar switches? I was reading that the built in ground is pretty bad for these...
- Where did you get your wire and heat shrink? I haven't ordered it yet and was considering options (princess auto? or online)

Keep up the good work!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jul 12, 2016, 14:46:18
Great thread - bike's looking good

Thanks man! She's getting there.

Your wiring diagram is saving me enormous amounts of time. I am doing Motogadget Pro, Switches, M-Button, and M-Unit as well however I am adding in the Dyna 2000, along with no alarm (you don't like the M-Unit alarm?). So it's almost identical - thank you!

- Shouldn't the fuse be located between the battery and the M-unit? Rather than after?
- Are you going to run grounds to your handlebar switches? I was reading that the built in ground is pretty bad for these...
- Where did you get your wire and heat shrink? I haven't ordered it yet and was considering options (princess auto? or online)

Keep up the good work!

Glad it could help you out. I've received so much help and assistance throughout this process so it's good to know others can benefit also. The m unit alarm function is basic whereas the Ride alarm is a alot more intense.. I'd rather be safe than sorry.

- Others I've asked have stated this also. I've done it this way for a few reasons. One is because my Ricks reg/rec came with a fusebox built into the wiring so in order for me to put a fuse in between the battery and the m unit is to splice into the reg/rec red wire before the fuse. Which is doable, but then it concerns me that the stator (coils) might surge and fry my battery! Is this a valid concern? Maybe the solution is to have one on either side?
- I am running grounds to the handlebar switches for sure, all new stuff.
- Revival Cycles: https://revivalcycles.com/collections/electrical sell some really great electrical stuff! I would very much recommend the delux cable kit that comes with all the wires you need! I would also recommend their single and double heatshrink kits among other items. I am not affiliated I just think they have good products.

Cheers!


Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Ct.Allen253 on Jul 13, 2016, 14:06:17
You may have already answered this, but where are you getting those parts exploded view pictures with the part numbers that you're hanging on your wall.

Just started following your build. Doing a lot of great work. Keep it up!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: MattCB750OT on Jul 15, 2016, 00:10:46
More Questions!

- Looks like you have two grounds coming from the handlebar switches, a red and black. Is this what I am seeing?
- What are the tiny black squares that look like they connect multiple wires? Ex. Turn L out side right after the M-unit? Is it just a splice?
- Your brake light, is it the long LED strip? Are you using the turn signals as a brake light or are they dedicated turn signals only?

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jul 15, 2016, 12:45:10
You may have already answered this, but where are you getting those parts exploded view pictures with the part numbers that you're hanging on your wall.

Just started following your build. Doing a lot of great work. Keep it up!

Thanks for the support man.. You can find the fiches here: http://shop.houseofhondaparts.com/fiche_select.asp

Just put in your bike model and select the fiche you need and save the images to your desktop or wherever and/or print them off.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jul 15, 2016, 12:48:03
More Questions!

- Looks like you have two grounds coming from the handlebar switches, a red and black. Is this what I am seeing?
- What are the tiny black squares that look like they connect multiple wires? Ex. Turn L out side right after the M-unit? Is it just a splice?
- Your brake light, is it the long LED strip? Are you using the turn signals as a brake light or are they dedicated turn signals only?

Hey man!

- So yes, this is the wiring that comes with the M-Switch Mini buttons, it's just they way they wire them. 2 grounds. Double checked this with a technician and it's accurately wired
- Yep those are splice points
- For now I am going to set it up so that just the running/brake light will light up and turn signals only activate when needed.. I may also modify it to run fully but I'm going to see what it looks like.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: el barto on Jul 15, 2016, 17:02:42
Thanks for the support man.. You can find the fiches here: http://shop.houseofhondaparts.com/fiche_select.asp

Just put in your bike model and select the fiche you need and save the images to your desktop or wherever and/or print them off.

That is an excellent site! Thanks for the share. Here's a link to a list of all the diagrams (instead of having to input part numbers etc): http://shop.houseofhondaparts.com/fiche_select2.asp?category=Motorcycles&make=Honda&year=1976&fveh=131082
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jul 28, 2016, 11:49:29
Back with another update! Things are moving along nicely now since receiving some of the parts I had been waiting on. Feels really really good to finally be able to move forward on the build and brake down some of the walls that were holding me back. I took the whole week off last wk and got a lot done in 5 days.

The sprocket came back all pretty, anodized and lightened. Fit that on with no problems. I used a "Steel Weld" metal putty to repair the inner diameter in the left fork boot that was causing a leak. After a careful sanding, I spread a thin layer of the putty around the inner diameter where the seal sits using a pick tool then sanded it back slightly after letting it set overnight. The fork seal went in nicely and when I rebuilt the forks and added the oil there was no more leak! Moving on from there I installed the front fender, brake arm, caliper and wheel. I also installed the rear wheel and rear sets (without the linkages for now until I get the chain and clutch cover in place). Could not install the chain due to the fact that I did not have a chain breaker tool required to brake and shorten the chain. I had to buy a longer chain because that's all they had in stock.

Even though I could not install the chain I had done ample research on the different types of chains and explain what conclusions I came up with in part 2 of the video below. Most of you on here probably already know all there is to know about motorcycle chains but for those that don't, give it a watch as it may help you make a better decision the next time you go to buy a new chain for your bike. Again these are just my opinions and some facts I found after reading a bunch of articles on motorcycle chains. Take from it what you will.

After that was done I installed the brake line, added brake fluid to the reservoir and bled the brake line of all air bubbles. The speed bleeder I got for the caliper worked excellently! If you are unfamiliar with a speed bleeder it basically only allows fluid/air to move outwards not inwards. So you loosen the bleeder bolt slightly and pump the front brake allowing fluid and air to escape (preferably through a small hose you have attached on the end of it so brake fluid doesn't spray all over the place!), as you let the brake go the bleeder closes the hole, not allowing air to be sucked back into the brake line. After a few pumps you are all good to go! It's super fast and I fully recommend one. Got the brakes set up well and moved on to other things from there. I also replaced the carb boot holder bolts with the stainless steel allen head bolts and did a general clean up around the garage, which felt amazing!

Ran into a few other walls though.. It seems that my oil dip stick has gone for a walk!! I've been pretty great at keeping track of my parts but for some reason this little guy got away from me. I had to go on ebay and order up another one for close to $30... bit the bullet on that one! I need it fast because I'm planning on starting this beast NEXT WEEKEND!! The other little wall was that the guys at Sparck Moto forgot to put the small baggy of parts that came with my signals back into the box when they shipped my harness to me. Luckily they found it and it's already in the mail! So as you may have guessed I have started the wiring process and thoroughly enjoyed it! I will get more into details in the next update but for now enjoy some video and pics from the above processes!

Updates should be coming faster in the coming weeks.

https://youtu.be/Wcg1Wt1cw60?list=PLEGYxRfUYAEWrjQ2M5HPq35ieq4_FO9Tg

https://youtu.be/R3WaGPy87dc?list=PLEGYxRfUYAEWrjQ2M5HPq35ieq4_FO9Tg

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: MattCB750OT on Jul 28, 2016, 13:41:27
Love the updates. Shooting for the same goal of next weekend!  How scary was it (is it..?) with the looming postal strike! Suddenly I am paying extra attention to how things are being shipped.

I ordered the same brake line kit from Revival for my rear brake... did they give you a better idea of why you couldn't get it together? Any tips?

I've got a chain breaker if you need one. Let me know!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: teazer on Jul 28, 2016, 19:12:00
FYI, the only tool needed to break a chain to shorten it is an angle grinder.  Seriously.  I have a top of the line tool and I found it better to use an angle grinder.  Just grind the heads of and push out the ground link.  Done.

O ring or X ring chains are great fr bikes that do a lot of miles but for weekend warriors, a non oring chain saves weight and loses less power through friction - a classic "twofer".  Yes you are right in your video that a no O ring chain requires more maintenance but not a whole lot more.  I fit O ring chains to bikes I am selling and non-O ring on my own bikes.

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: jpmobius on Jul 28, 2016, 20:48:41
Really nice work so far.  Great job researching and persevering through! 
Just wanted to call your attention to the kinematics of the new rear brake set up you have.  If you remove the shocks and move the rear suspension through its travel, you will see the brake pedal moves up and down.  This will have the effect of the pedal pulsing up and down under your foot when you go over bumps.  If you are braking when you hit bumps, very likely you will encounter a lot more and less braking than you intend as the suspension moves.  This is extremely unnerving if you ride hard and use the rear brake in corners!  Factory set ups avoid this problem by placing the pivot between the pull rod and actuating crank arm very close to the swing arm pivot.  You will see that your own factory linkage has this pivot very close to the swing arm pivot and along the line between the swing arm pivot and the rear axle.  This set up also provides a very small bit of interaction between the suspension motion and the brake kinematics, but it is so small that you don't notice it.  This will not be the case with the way you have your brake set up.  Most mechanical rear brakes that can no longer use the original brake pedal use the original pivot and crank arm with a linkage to the new pedal or eliminate this issue all together by using a cable.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: irk miller on Jul 28, 2016, 20:56:06
I like cable on a rear drum.  Easy to set up and looks nice too- with a nice swooping line from pedal to lever. 
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: trek97 on Jul 29, 2016, 08:08:26
Hey bud, you got a nice build going.
But, front tire looks backwards. 
double check the direction of rotation arrows.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jul 29, 2016, 08:16:55
Hey bud, you got a nice build going.
But, front tire looks backwards. 
double check the direction of rotation arrows.
Very nice observation! It is indeed backwards. I did not fit the tire onto the rim but will be taking it back to the mechanic that did as soon as I can. I noticed this months ago. Thanks for the heads up.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Andyp on Jul 30, 2016, 07:18:57
Hay Tone, the tyres are meant to be opposite directions. I thought this when I got mine back. Google it and there is a science behind it. Better displacement of water apparently. Keep wrenching"
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jul 30, 2016, 08:49:32
Hay Tone, the tyres are meant to be opposite directions. I thought this when I got mine back. Google it and there is a science behind it. Better displacement of water apparently. Keep wrenching"
Serious bruv?! Damn son. Thanks for the heads up Andy!

Interesting article on that: http://cyrilhuzeblog.com/2009/08/23/tires-directional-arrows-explained-by-avon-tyres/
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Psycrow on Aug 01, 2016, 17:48:40
FYI, the only tool needed to break a chain to shorten it is an angle grinder.  Seriously.  I have a top of the line tool and I found it better to use an angle grinder.  Just grind the heads of and push out the ground link.  Done.

O ring or X ring chains are great fr bikes that do a lot of miles but for weekend warriors, a non oring chain saves weight and loses less power through friction - a classic "twofer".  Yes you are right in your video that a no O ring chain requires more maintenance but not a whole lot more.  I fit O ring chains to bikes I am selling and non-O ring on my own bikes.
although I disagree with the opinion on using standard roller chains over O/X ring chains I whole heartedly agree with breaking a chain with an angle grinder. those over priced specialty chain tools are worthless.

Psy

Sent from my SM-G903W using Tapatalk

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Tune-A-Fish© on Aug 01, 2016, 18:21:23
although I disagree with the opinion on using standard roller chains over O/X ring chains I whole heartedly agree with breaking a chain with an angle grinder. those over priced specialty chain tools are worthless.

Psy

Sent from my SM-G903W using Tapatalk

Good stuff!

O/X ring does last longer for the commuter ride and less trouble, ( I buy what is best for the app) but if you keep a chunk of spare chain around to have that continuous loop swap and a pair of gloves, pull the chain toss it in the bucket of parts cleaner of choice... go relax eat dinner then go out for a beer and while enjoying that, douche out the crap blow it out with air and pull it back in... hose it down with Maxima and yer ready for beer #2  :o   
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Aug 11, 2016, 12:23:20
Things have really been heating up in the old Saturday's Wrench workshop (read: my parents garage :D). This heat has really been hard to work through with most days being 35-40 degrees with the humidity in the tiny garage. I've been taking a lot of days off work and putting in 12-14hr full days and just completely busting my ass to get through the home stretch and have some exciting updates coming down the pipe. This really is the home stretch and I am definitely feeling it! (exhausted) This has been nothing short of the most challenging and most time encompassing project I have every under taken but I'm enjoying every second and I can't wait to fire this beast up!!! 

Firstly though I wanted to share this video I made of me going through my custom wiring diagram if you're interested. Again, a special thank you to Stefan at Revival Cycles (http://"https://revivalcycles.com/") for guiding me through the process of creating my own wiring diagram. Hopefully it will help you out if you're planning to fit an M-Unit or any other Motogadget components.

https://youtu.be/1cpdUm4xRcM

The wiring process has been tons of fun!! I am thoroughly enjoying making the proper wiring connections, building secondary harness' and just making everything look as neat and organized as possible. I will have a 2 part electrical update coming in the next wk or 2 hopefully! Just have to edit them up.

Wiring has been completed and I am currently waiting an M-Lock RFID key switch I ordered at the beginning of June! You know something is in demand when it takes more than 2 months to receive it! I have everything hooked up and ready to go except I can't turn the system on without a key switch. My savior Rob from Bullit Custom Cycles was nice enough to send me one in the meantime until the one I ordered shows up. Rob, you are a gentleman and a scholar. So that's in the mail and should arrive by Friday.

The other wall I hit was when I went to install my custom exhaust and found out that the spacer inserts that sit inside the cylinder head were too short!! It seems that I need the longer inserts that come on the 68-70 CB350. Chad Williams, a fellow CB350 enthusiast and all around awesome dude from the forums here who helped me get the exhaust was nice enough to sell me an old pair he had lying around and those should show up next wk sometime. I guess I could fit on the stock pipes to fire her up in the meantime but I highly doubt I will. I really just want to wait until I have this custom exhaust on for the full effect!! Excited to show that off as well in the next couple updates.

So as she goes right now everything is ready except for those 2 items. The tank showed up from the painter and is looking cool. Emblems are cleaned and repainted and everything is looking sharp! Really reall close!!! Pics to come...
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Aug 17, 2016, 21:22:50
So for the next part of the build I needed to clean up my harness I got from Sparck Moto and generally set all the electrical components up so that when I go to install everything it will be more or less a plug and play. Here's is the latest video I made of me doing just that. You may see me make a few mistakes here and there but keep in mind this is my very first time every wiring a motorcycle. If you have any suggestions on how I can improve please don't hesitate to tell me.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=27d3xCaD6IU&feature=gp-n-y&google_comment_id=z12dtzujlpfxffnbl04chjjhulqpepn5qmg0k

The guys at Sparck made me a really nice harness but there was a few things I needed to clean up and add to it before I could install it. I really do wish I tackled this harness on my own as I had quite a lot of fun making the connections and secondary harnesses. I added ferrules to all the input and output connections for the m-Unit. I also had to make a secondary harness on the right side of the bike for the coils and electronic ignition modulator. The wire diagram I made was SUPER helpful in getting this process completed as it served as a really great guide while I was doing all this work. I also had to make all the connections for my tachometer so that I can simply plug it in when I am ready. After all this I drilled into the bars for the control and signal wires and got everything set up nicely. I made nice ground strap and starter motor cable and removed paint from the upper rear engine mount so I could have a solid metal on metal connection. It was pretty time consuming getting all the wiring done just so I would be ready for install but I really did enjoy it a lot.

Next I will install all my components into the custom battery box I made and get the harness installed on the bike with the headlight and bucket.. exciting times! Hopefully get to that update next week!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: yorkie350 on Aug 18, 2016, 06:12:21
Great update as usual mate your build is surgical mate you're like a bike doctor ,so precise loving it as ever can't wait for the big day when you fire her up and you wont stop grinning gonna be worth every penny and blood sweat n beer's haha keep up this class build mate
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Aug 18, 2016, 07:10:54
Great update as usual mate your build is surgical mate you're like a bike doctor ,so precise loving it as ever can't wait for the big day when you fire her up and you wont stop grinning gonna be worth every penny and blood sweat n beer's haha keep up this class build mate
Cheers Yorkie! Almost have her complete. Will take some time to get her tuned up but she's pretty close. Thanks for the encouragement.
So for the next part of the build I needed to clean up my harness I got from Sparck Moto and generally set all the electrical components up so that when I go to install everything it will be more or less a plug and play. Here's is the latest video I made of me doing just that. You may see me make a few mistakes here and there but keep in mind this is my very first time every wiring a motorcycle. If you have any suggestions on how I can improve please don't hesitate to tell me.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=27d3xCaD6IU&feature=gp-n-y&google_comment_id=z12dtzujlpfxffnbl04chjjhulqpepn5qmg0k

The guys at Sparck made me a really nice harness but there was a few things I needed to clean up and add to it before I could install it. I really do wish I tackled this harness on my own as I had quite a lot of fun making the connections and secondary harnesses. I added ferrules to all the input and output connections for the m-Unit. I also had to make a secondary harness on the right side of the bike for the coils and electronic ignition modulator. The wire diagram I made was SUPER helpful in getting this process completed as it served as a really great guide while I was doing all this work. I also had to make all the connections for my tachometer so that I can simply plug it in when I am ready. After all this I drilled into the bars for the control and signal wires and got everything set up nicely. I made nice ground strap and starter motor cable and removed paint from the upper rear engine mount so I could have a solid metal on metal connection. It was pretty time consuming getting all the wiring done just so I would be ready for install but I really did enjoy it a lot.

Next I will install all my components into the custom battery box I made and get the harness installed on the bike with the headlight and bucket.. exciting times! Hopefully get to that update next week!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Aug 29, 2016, 18:54:30
It’s about time to get you guys up to speed about what’s been going on with the build. Been a bit slow on the updates due to the fact that I’m trying to time them with my editing process. That’s the price you pay when you decide to document your entire process!

Here is my latest installment of the video series for my build. It’s a bit longer than I wanted it to be but the wiring process actually took a lot of time! In it I finish up all the electrical work on the bike including installing the wire harness and all the electrical components in the bike. Check it out when you get some time on your hands:

https://youtu.be/51SVcZ553RE


I would say the electrical process went pretty smoothly but was quite time consuming. It took me some time to prepare my custom battery box for the install as I had to drill out a few mounting holes and cut away a space for the reg/rec wires so I could easily route and hide them inside the box. If I were to ever do this again I would pay more consideration into the mounting points on the box to the frame. The way mine were set up are not very ideal at all as they hang down from the two crossover support pieces in the middle of the frame. This made tightening the nylon nuts I used quite difficult as my electronic components were in the way on the top of the battery box. So my advice to others attempting a custom electronics tray or something like this would be to really measure accurately and think about all aspects before going forward and really create something that mounts on quite easily and out of the way of the components you plan on fitting inside the box.

After prepping the box I started to add my components. My alarm and solenoid are sitting in the bottom of the box underneath the m-Unit shelf. I used 3M Velcro strips to hold those in place. I designed a space for the excess wires to sit in a neat bundle and a little window in the shelf for the wires under there to be able to connect to the battery and m-Unit. I carefully used zip ties to bundle the alarm wires so they would sit neatly in between the battery and the space behind the reg/rec. After mounting the m-Unit onto the top shelf I installed it on top of the other components inside the box and tried to group the negative and positive wires together for easy battery connection.

Installing the headlight bucket and controls were pretty easy since I had prepped all the wires into the bars first. I used double wall heat shrink over the areas of wire that were making contact to the edges of the holes I drilled into the bars so that the wires would not chafe and cause potential short hazards. After running all the wires into the headlight bucket, everything connected up really easily. My diagram was a huge help in setting this all up. I also had to run an extra wire into the headlight through a secondary loom I made for the RPM input on the tach from the ignition modulator. This unfortunately did not come with my wiring harness but it was easy enough to set up and run it side by side with the main harness along the frame into the headlight bucket. I tried to run the harness along the top part of the frame in order to distance it from the spark plug wires as I did not want the high tension cables to interfere with my electrical wires.

I wrapped the starter motor cable with Super 33 electric tape then heat shrink wrapped all of the exposed parts of the wire under the engine and inside the chain compartment. I was warned that a short on the starter motor wire was one of the greatest causes of motorcycle fires and really just wanted to take the time and effort to make sure nothing like that would happen on my bike. If you are fitting an after market wire for this application like I am i would strongly recommend taking the time to protect and shield the wire as much as possible. You’ll notice the stock cable has a pretty thick jacket over it and this is for a very good reason as I have learned. Common knowledge to most of you guys but overlooked by a few.

The ground cable was attached to the upper rear engine mounting bolt after paint was removed in that area to ensure solid metal on metal contact with the frame. I used 6 gauge wire for this particular application and again protected the wire with double wall heat shrink.

After everything was in place I double checked every single connection and took a volt meter to the battery to make sure it was ready to go. I took an extra long couple of deep breaths and connected the positive leads first then the negative leads. High five for not blowing anything up! I saw the m-Unit light up and got pretty excited. I waved the master key of the m-Lock over the fob and saw the lights race around the m-Unit then go off… I thought I had a short in the system but then realized I needed to ‘teach’ the other keys by holding them up to the fob after waving the master key.

The first wake up of the system went well! I was pleased nothing exploded or melted but have to admit that I was about ready to crap myself. 1st time ever attempting to wire a motorcycle and had already made some pretty rookie mistakes on this build, if something were to happen it would’ve been an expensive and time costly mistake. All is well though! The lights and horn all function as expected. Pretty happy about moving forward on this beast!!

My next steps will be to find a proper spot for the m-Lock key reader and get the exhaust, chain and clutch installed. I will also need to install my fuel lines before I can start this bike up. That should be coming up really soon. I actually finished this wiring process a few weeks ago but have since been away the last few weekends on some trips I booked months ago. I am looking forward to getting back into the garage this week to finish up. Hopefully things continue to go smoothly.

Enjoy some pictures for now and I will hope to be back with an update soon. Thanks for your interest.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: yorkie350 on Aug 29, 2016, 19:39:01
Fantastic update as usual mate and the work you got done with the "lectricary" is really clean I know that crossed fingers feeling when you go for the key first time getting close mate getting close, keep it up loving this build shame for us its gonna be complete one day ??? look forward to the ride video tho
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Aug 31, 2016, 13:13:57
Fantastic update as usual mate and the work you got done with the "lectricary" is really clean I know that crossed fingers feeling when you go for the key first time getting close mate getting close, keep it up loving this build shame for us its gonna be complete one day ??? look forward to the ride video tho

Cheers Yorkie! Ran into some more problems as you will see in the next post but getting really close!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Aug 31, 2016, 13:14:24
Had a frustrating night in the garage recently, here's the latest.

So I went in to set up the gas lines and install the exhaust in hopes that I would actually be able to start the bike but ran into some more major setbacks unfortunately. I've been assured that it's pretty normal to run into problems but I am beginning to think that karma does NOT want me to ride this season (or at all??). Either way a lot of guys who have undertaken the task of a motorcycle rebuild will say it's a long road, one in which that can get pretty dark & dusty sometimes. I can definitely attest! I'm on the ropes over here but I'm not giving up! I feel like Clark Griswold in National Lampoons Christmas Vacation when his family tries to leave after the dog chases the squirrel around the house.

Here are my latest frustrating conundrums in list format (FML):
- gas tank has a pin hole leak which is causing the paint to bubble (yay!)
- spark plug threads are damaged on the right cylinder, plug will not torque (woo!)
- 2 threads on the left cover are also damaged, heli coils have been installed but bolts still won't torque (woohoo!)
- Custom exhaust will not fit on with the center stand! Need kick stand fabricated (probably a blessing in disguise)
- Battery over-discharged and cells are wickedly unbalanced (due to poor storage since I purchased that battery about a year ago and left it in the box in the house.. rookie move)

Fortunately I am working on some quick solutions! I don't know why I didn't think I needed to seal the tank but that is what's going to happen asap. I remember thinking that I didn't need to seal the tank after the beautiful results I achieved with the Metal Rescue and the fact that both me and the painter had gone over the tank with putty to make sure the problem areas were taken care of. I am using the epoxy tank sealer from Caswell (http://"http://www.caswellcanada.ca/shop/epoxy-gas-tank-sealer.html") as I have been assured it's one of the best and easiest products to work with for this application. Painter has already agreed to do some touch ups on the paint.

For the broken threads I am going to leave them to Jeff Busch, the experienced mechanic that helped out on the engine rebuild. He's assured me that he can handle it with no problems.

Rob over at Bullit Custom Cycles is being a major major bahd by taking care of a few things for me. He's going to make me a kick stand mount, a license plate holder and a bracket for my tach. My goal was to install the tach into the headlight bucket, but that is going to happen over the fall. 

I recharged the battery but was getting some weird flashing sequence on the dedicated charger that was not explained in the manual. I put it on charge and checked it with the volt meter to make sure the volts were going up. When it was done I tried to hook it back up on the bike but when I did I got some sparks and the horn sounded! The m-Unit does this when the battery is faulty to warn you of cook off... Love having that thing in my corner. After speaking with the manufacturer about what was going on they told me that my battery has been in an over-discharged state and needed to be balanced and recharged in a specific manner. They don't put this in the manual for whatever reason but emailed me the instructions and they seemed to have worked out well. I left the battery and charger on "Store" mode for 24 hours to balance the cells then recharged to just over 14 volts. I haven't tried to hook it back up but I'm not getting the error lights on the charger anymore so I am feeling positive (:D) about the whole thing.

Getting closer. Climbing Mt Everest! But getting closer.

Stay tuned.
Title: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: xulf13 on Aug 31, 2016, 17:57:00
Ouch man. That really stinks. Been following your build for a while now. Set backs are part of the journey. Take them as an opportunity to make things better and learn.  I can relate to a few of your setbacks. Keep at it man.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Habanero52 on Sep 01, 2016, 14:07:33
Nice job!!!!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Habanero52 on Sep 01, 2016, 14:19:38
Where did yo get the wire ferrules?
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: el barto on Sep 03, 2016, 12:28:10
Super clean 8)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Sep 20, 2016, 11:07:37
Ouch man. That really stinks. Been following your build for a while now. Set backs are part of the journey. Take them as an opportunity to make things better and learn.  I can relate to a few of your setbacks. Keep at it man.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Cheers bud.. well said! Thanks for the encouragement.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Sep 20, 2016, 11:08:59
Where did yo get the wire ferrules?

They come with the Motogadget wiring kit.. You can find them at various electronic supply stores online though. I found them on www.digiket.ca
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Sep 20, 2016, 11:10:01
Here is the latest on the build:
- the battery has been repaired! After sitting in store mode for a few days I hooked it up and everything works perfectly. It seems as though it just needed to be balanced and recharged. I have since disconnected the battery until I am ready to fire the bike to avoid over discharging it again and risking complete breakdown
- Gas tank has been fully sealed and repaired! The Caswell Epoxy Gas Tank sealer worked really really well! It was relatively easy to work with. The tank is currently sitting at the paint shop. He repainted the chipped areas and rebuffed the entire thing, I will be picking that up on Friday night!
- Mr Busche of Busche's Garage picked up the bike last Sunday.. I swear it was like watching a child leave on the first day of school hahaha.. I have a problem.. As stated in a previous post, Busche is currently working on repairing the spark plug thread on the #2 cylinder and some other various things like installing the front tire around to face the proper direction. Most importantly, he is really going to thoroughly check every single nut and bolt on the entire bike to make sure I didn't massively screw anything up. This is a good move for my life expectancy as I plan on enjoying this little machine for years and years to come.

I'm finally free this weekend to meet up with Busche to get things going! We are planning on installing the gas tank, fuel lines, clutch cable, rear set linkage, chain and exhaust! I am really looking for positive vibes from the community as I am planning on finally firing the motor this wknd!! Jeff's going to take me through the tuning process as well, which I am excited to learn.

I'll update back next wk but probably won't have a video for another week after that. Looking forward to sharing her sound with you guys.. I'm actually really excited just writing this out! Can't wait to ride the beautiful Norther Ontario Autumn countryside in the coming weeks before it gets too damn cold... The timing sucks but I have some major plans over the winter for the build that I'm excited to share with you guys. Looking forward to sculpting my very own custom seat cowl, fabing up one of those fancy foot break levers so I can run the rear brake linkage properly and possible installing the tachometer into the headlight among other little details on the bike.

Stay tuned! Hopefully all goes well this weekend.. Positive vibes:grin:
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: yorkie350 on Sep 20, 2016, 11:38:00
All sounds positive mate, these things always crop up, at least your getting sorted before your miles from home with a rain storm coming and no juice in ya cell phone ha ( sounds like I know that feeling ) , always here if you need to bend an ear keep going mate the sound of her ticking over will easy push you to the finish looking forward too .
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Habanero52 on Sep 22, 2016, 12:17:42
They come with the Motogadget wiring kit.. You can find them at various electronic supply stores online though. I found them on www.digiket.ca
Thanks!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Sep 22, 2016, 16:00:19
All sounds positive mate, these things always crop up, at least your getting sorted before your miles from home with a rain storm coming and no juice in ya cell phone ha ( sounds like I know that feeling ) , always here if you need to bend an ear keep going mate the sound of her ticking over will easy push you to the finish looking forward too .

haha ahhh yes.. been there before. 12am.. almost out of gas.. no cell.. dark country road. Fun times! Thanks for the support bud. Looking forward to posting a start up vid.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Sep 22, 2016, 16:03:57
I almost forgot to share something cool that I accidentally discovered while trying to re-paint my tank badges. I wanted to clean them up nicely for the freshly painted tank so I decided that I would try to repaint them. Everyone has their methods and being that I have never done anything like this I figured I would just try to carefully repaint the white lettering and the black outline. If anyone on here has ever attempted this you would know that this method is quite complicated and very tedious!

Well I got a fancy little paintbrush and some outdoor acrylic model paint from the art store and began painting the white lettering. I kept screwing up big time and smudging the paint all over the place. Maybe I didn't have the correct brush or a very steady hand... I don't know. Either way I wanted to clean it off and start over so I reached for this paint thinner my dad had lying around called "Number 7 Thinner". I dabbed some on a rag and started cleaning off the fresh paint I had applied and started to notice that it was also removing a layer of filth. Beneath the filth was this brilliant white paint! It was magical. You can see that in the 1st pic below.

The thinner didn't damage the original white paint for whatever reason but I began rubbing it into the other letters and before you know it I had what looked like a brand new badge on my hands! I repainted the black area (because that was a lot easier!) and they cleaned up really really well! I am thinking of spraying them with a nice clear coat to really just preserve the fresh finish and add a bit of glimmer to the tank.

I'm curious to know if this No.7 Thinner was the cause or if any regular thinner will work (varsol?). Either way, before you kill 17 hours trying to repaint those fine white letters while preserving the silver edge, try this thinner cleaning method. It may just save you a day or 2...
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Sep 26, 2016, 14:42:28
Coming out of another frustrating weekend of wrenching. We spent 2 full days over the wknd trying to get the bike finished. Sad to report, still no 'fire event'!

Jeff Busche, the mechanic who helped with my engine rebuild started on the bike early Saturday and got a good amount finished. He swapped the front tire back to it's proper position, repaired the 2 left cover striped threads and the right cylinder spark plug thread. We installed the chain easily enough and started to get ready to add oil to the motor.

We left the stator cover off because we knew we would have to check timing once we started the motor. We added the break-in oil and removed the small 10mm bolt from the left top side of the motor to make sure we could look in and see that the top end was getting oil and removed the spark plugs for easy turn over. After pumping the kick starter for what seemed like an eternity we could not see any oil running to the top of the motor. We double checked the oil routing diagram, drained the oil, removed the right cover and made sure 100% the pump was operating correctly. It was pumping oil. We made sure the small oil slinger cover was operational by pumping oil through the galleries, all functioned well. We shot some air into the small gallery hole just above the oil slinger that pumps oil to the top of the crank and also up the cylinder studs. I placed my finger over the small opening at the top left side of the motor and could feel the air and actually saw some oil spit out. After seeing that it was not blocked we patched everything back up, filled her belly with oil and tried again... nothing! We even hooked a battery up to the starter and turned the motor over 5 or 6 times with the starter at very short 2-3 second intervals thinking that it just needed some quicker pressure. I made extra extra sure that we caked everything up at the top of the motor with RED LINE assembly lube. Is this concerning??

Laying in bed last night I had the thought that since the left stator cover wasn't on the motor couldn't build up any pressure to send oil to the top of the motor... Is that a valid concern?

We decided to move on to see how the electronics and spark plugs were working. They did not fire a spark. For those that don't know, I am using suppressor core wire with NGK resistor caps. Perhaps an overkill? The suppressor core wire was recommended due to the Motogadget m-Button wire being that it sends a digital signal and normal spark plug wire has been known to mess with that signal due to EMI. For the resistor caps, according to my Probe Ignition manual, they are "absolutely mandatory!".

We tested the wires for continuity and found that the spark plug wires were dead wires. I re-assembled the resistor caps (on the advice from Stefan of Revival Cycles) in the spark plug wire so that the spiral screw on the caps goes in just to the SIDE of the inner core wire, being that the conductive part of that particular wire is on the outside of that spiral wound core. We re-tested and found that we were getting continuity. We re-assembled and still were not getting a spark! We tested all wires for continuity and found no problems.

Any suggestions? Any other members here using a Probe Ignition?

We are going to try the system with regular spark plug wire and see how we net out next weekend. The frustrating part is that I have to wait a week to work on the bike again since it's 1.5hrs away from where I live.

Any light you could shed on the situation would be appreciated.

Thanks as always!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Sonreir on Sep 26, 2016, 14:47:46
The oil isn't a huge concern (yet).

Four stroke crank cases aren't pressurized, so no worries about running things with the stator cover off. You need that cover off to check dynamic timing. Ideally the bike is on the center stand when it's running, however.

The lack of oil is probably due to the pump that was used in the early Honda twins. It cam sometimes take almost a full minute for oil to get from the sump up into the head. It's not a very high pressure system like you get in modern vehicles.

For spark, there are a number of places to check.

First, verify that you're getting 12V out of the AUX port on the m-unit. Next check for voltage on the power wires for the Probe unit as well as each coil.

If you have power in all of those places, the problem is likely to be an issue with the ignition unit. Possibly the unit itself or possibly the way it's been hooked up.

It's also possible the coils are no good, but that is less likely (especially if they're new) because it would take something catastrophic to kill both of them.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Oct 17, 2016, 11:42:31
The oil isn't a huge concern (yet).

Four stroke crank cases aren't pressurized, so no worries about running things with the stator cover off. You need that cover off to check dynamic timing. Ideally the bike is on the center stand when it's running, however.

The lack of oil is probably due to the pump that was used in the early Honda twins. It cam sometimes take almost a full minute for oil to get from the sump up into the head. It's not a very high pressure system like you get in modern vehicles.

For spark, there are a number of places to check.

First, verify that you're getting 12V out of the AUX port on the m-unit. Next check for voltage on the power wires for the Probe unit as well as each coil.

If you have power in all of those places, the problem is likely to be an issue with the ignition unit. Possibly the unit itself or possibly the way it's been hooked up.

It's also possible the coils are no good, but that is less likely (especially if they're new) because it would take something catastrophic to kill both of them.

I have followed your checklist and everything checks out fine. All very good tips. Thanks for the advice, really appreciate it!

It's about time for a little update.

So it's taken some time to get back into Busche's Garage, due to the fact that he was either busy, away for the Canadian Thanksgiving long weekend or just simply burnt out from work. Busche lives 1.5hrs from me so the only time frame to meet is on weekends. Since my last update I had to wait until this past Saturday to get back working on the old girl again.

We spent hours and hours trying to get to the route of this 'no spark' problem I am currently having. Busche switched out my suppressor core wire with regular spark plug wire and kept the resistor caps but we are still not getting a spark during engine rotation. The bike is ready to roll otherwise and it's been really really hard to look at her sitting all pretty and not being able to start up! We tested pretty much everything in my electronics. We made sure there was continuity through all the wires, proper ground, proper connections and made sure power was routing to places it was suppose to.. All is checking out. While sitting around scratching our heads we decided just to double check that the static timing on the Probe Ignition was set up correctly. In the manual they provide a specific procedure for adjusting this and even provide a small harness that you hook up to a 9v battery so that the module is independent from your electronic system. When you connect the 9v battery through the harness a small red LED light illuminates. As per instructions you are to rotate the engine slowly and wait for the light to go out. I had already done this myself and set the static timing perfectly but Busche just wanted to make sure.. covering all the bases. When I had done it originally the light went out as it said it would and you rotate the pick up plate to a specific location so that the light goes out at or between the 'LT' and 'LF' marks on the alternator rotor. Well... it wasn't going out for some reason this time and that was a red flag. Busche came to the conclusion there must be a problem with ignition modulator because we checked all the wires coming from the pickup plate and they are all sending voltage to the modulator when we rotated the engine. The modulator is just not sending a signal to the coils for whatever reason or blocking it.. we don't know. What was also odd to me is that when we would turn the electronic system on with the fob the spark plugs would fire once and do the same when the system was turned off. Busche explained that it does this to collapse the fields inside the coils at start up and shut down. Why were the plugs operating normally at these times but not when the engine was rotating?? Perplexed the heck out of me but I'm glad I have a guy like Busche on my side helping me out because I would literally be smashing my face on the bench over and over and over! lol..

We THINK we have found the problem, but it could be other things. It's very tricky! All these parts from various manufactures trying to get to know each other and work seamlessly together.. It's tough. It could be that my reg/rec is not a good fit for the ignition box? We don't know at this point. All we know is that the ignition modulator is not functioning as it should be and there's a very good chance that there might be something wrong with it... We'll see!

In the meantime we've installed the chain & clutch cover/cable. Engine has break in oil ready to go and everything else is ready to install. My riding days are numbered up here in the Great White North though. Either way, I would rather have the bike working perfectly than half ass the whole project. As always, I've been told this comes with the territory. So patience.. learning a lot of that this year. Next year I will live on that darn bike!!! Obviously I will report back once we get her fired. For now the wait continues.

Hope all your projects are going well. I have some catching up to do with the build threads.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: yorkie350 on Oct 17, 2016, 12:23:31
Glad to hear ya still wrenching mate, sucks you ain't up n runnin yet but your doing it the right way , no point rushing and spoiling your project just to get a quick ride out before the white stuff lands .Still enjoying ya thread mate always here if ya need a cheer cross the finish line .
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Nov 03, 2016, 11:31:58
Glad to hear ya still wrenching mate, sucks you ain't up n runnin yet but your doing it the right way , no point rushing and spoiling your project just to get a quick ride out before the white stuff lands .Still enjoying ya thread mate always here if ya need a cheer cross the finish line .

You're the man Yorkie! Thanks for the kinds words and encouragement as always bud!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Nov 03, 2016, 11:34:44
Ladies & Gentlemen...

WE HAVE LIFT OFF!!!!

A successful fire! Bike sounds realllll mean. Lots of power and the throttle response is insane in the membrane. A small gust of wind would blow this throttle wide open! It feels amazing to hear this beast run for the first time!!

So as mentioned earlier, after hours and hours of troubleshooting we decided to run the stock points. After some tinkering and set up we were able to confirm spark and we got the bike to fire up 1st try! I heard back from Mark Whitebook about the Probe Ignition I sent back to him. He confirmed that it was damaged.. I do not have the slightest clue as to how it got damaged, but it did. I must've read that manual 10 times at least! I followed every step with the utmost care and consideration. Yet, somehow the unit was damaged. He's quite a character, let me tell you. He told me that he does not have time nor any interest whatsoever to troubleshoot my problem and refused to send me back a replacement. He did agree however to refund my money, which was not necessarily required and really generous of him. I got lucky with that but still I feel disappointed that I can't run that sweet sweet ignition. I asked him if he could possibly send me a new one anyway and he didn't respond.. haha He wiped his hands clean of me... Cheers Mark.

I ordered a Charlie's Place Ignition in the meantime. It showed up and I didn't even realize it doesn't have an electronic advance system yet it's more expensive than Pamco. The Charlie's Place Ignition uses the stock mechanical advancer which I find a little concerning. I'm in the market for replacing mechanical parts, not having to maintain them.. That was the POINT about replacing the ignition system. I've heard tons and tons of reviews for both Charlie's Place & Pamco, both negative and positive. I guess we'll see.. I plan on doing a full test and may pick up a Pamco unit down the road to compare the 2 for research purposes and make a little video about it.

Either way, I have a running motorcycle now! Just in time for winter up here in Canada lol! While at Busche's Garage we got the chain and clutch cover/cable installed and began the tuning process but ran out of time in the end. I will be taking over the tuning process from here on out and after receiving a bag full of Mikuni jets, slides and needles from the fine folks at Niche Cycles (http://"http://www.nichecycle.com/ncs/"), I am planning on diving into the tuning process this weekend. I'll be making a full video on my process with that, so stay tuned! I've been reading through the carb sticky here on the forum and the Mikuni 5th edition Tuning Manual and learned a lot! I can't wait to get into it this Friday/Saturday and report back.

Check out the latest video here of us starting up the bike for the first time:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_J0v7acjmZs

I know a lot of you guys are dying to see the tank and seat combo and I'm sorry for holding out on that. I wanted to have  the bike actually running and complete before I showed everyone. I just think the bike is a complete package and what's the point of showing a picture of the tank or a seat when you have nothing to reference it to. I am planning on shooting a little video this weekend of the bike completely together and will report back after it's complete.

Here are some other pics of the process at Busche's Garage.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Tune-A-Fish© on Nov 03, 2016, 12:12:57
Nice to hear em come to life  :P

This is a great image, no hack shop here.

(http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=63704.0;attach=181851;image)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Nov 03, 2016, 12:31:48
Nice to hear em come to life  :P

This is a great image, no hack shop here.

Thank you sir! Ya, Mr. Busche ain't F$%#&*# around. Man's a damn fine motorcycle mechanic!  8)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: el barto on Nov 03, 2016, 13:30:28
Hurrah. Congrats on getting it running. Got a chuckle out of the dude who sold you the ignition washing his hands of you. What a douche.

I'm running a Pamco on my CB360 and can vouch for it being very good, for what it's worth. After enquiring about the Charlie's Place ignition I started a thread that might be of some use deciding between the two, but probably not. Makes for interesting reading anyway: http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=67987.0

As you said, there's so much positive and negative stuff out there about both units and so many opinions. In the end I settled on the Pamco because of the electronic advance and generally there seemed to be more help out there with it, more people using it.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Luugo86 on Nov 03, 2016, 15:38:36
Looks pretty damn good so far. I really like that exhaust, what make is it?
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Nov 03, 2016, 15:59:19
Looks pretty damn good so far. I really like that exhaust, what make is it?

It's a custom made exhaust. I found a guy who's a Yoshimura technician to make it.. He does them for the race guys out in California. Got his contact from a fellow 350 racer over on the Hondatwins forum.

Hurrah. Congrats on getting it running. Got a chuckle out of the dude who sold you the ignition washing his hands of you. What a douche.

I'm running a Pamco on my CB360 and can vouch for it being very good, for what it's worth. After enquiring about the Charlie's Place ignition I started a thread that might be of some use deciding between the two, but probably not. Makes for interesting reading anyway: http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=67987.0

As you said, there's so much positive and negative stuff out there about both units and so many opinions. In the end I settled on the Pamco because of the electronic advance and generally there seemed to be more help out there with it, more people using it.

haha yep... anyway thanks! I just read through the thread and there's some pretty good opinions/points made. I guess at the end of the day we all have our troubles with all the parts we use. Either way I doubt I will have any troubles at all on start up with the bike so I should be good with Charlie's ignition for now.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: yorkie350 on Nov 03, 2016, 17:38:27
YEAH !! AWESOME Tony so glad you got to the bottom of the spark problem bet your still grinning from ear to ear ime stoked for you mate no other feeling like it when your project barks into life for the first time ,that's down to you so sit back and down a beer and feel proud !
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: SF on Nov 07, 2016, 16:41:21
I got to say I spent the weekend reading your thread and really enjoyed the detailed vids! You have a great looking and from what I hear performing bike. I live north of TO and can show you some great local roads and would love to check out your bike....I'll have to get my mom's 350 I restored out and get some pics.

Shawn
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Nov 07, 2016, 17:19:56
YEAH !! AWESOME Tony so glad you got to the bottom of the spark problem bet your still grinning from ear to ear ime stoked for you mate no other feeling like it when your project barks into life for the first time ,that's down to you so sit back and down a beer and feel proud !

Cheers bud! Ya I was losing my shit lol.. Such a great feeling and finally a bit of luck. Charlie's Place ignition showed up last wk so I installed that into the engine over the wknd. Ran out of time so I had to leave the garage.. was super frustrating. I was literally just setting up the fuel lines and had to stop everything and go! Heading back this wknd to finish off the tuning and take her out for a good test run... can barely contain myself.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Nov 07, 2016, 17:22:42
I got to say I spent the weekend reading your thread and really enjoyed the detailed vids! You have a great looking and from what I hear performing bike. I live north of TO and can show you some great local roads and would love to check out your bike....I'll have to get my mom's 350 I restored out and get some pics.

Shawn

Hey Shawn, thanks for the kind words and your interest in the project. I am very very interested in these roads you speak of! I'm going to PM you my contact info and we'll set up some exploring in the spring bud.

Talk soon!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: CALfeRacer on Nov 08, 2016, 02:15:31
This is awesome! Sounds great, glad to see/hear it running! Can't wait to see the seat/tank setup too. However, it does make me feel bad about the fact that my 350 has been sitting in boxes for the last two and a half years :o
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Green199 on Nov 09, 2016, 07:24:04
Nice one Tony! Glad its had its first post rebuild start up! Sounds lovely with the 2-1!  :)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Nov 11, 2016, 16:32:15
Nice one Tony! Glad its had its first post rebuild start up! Sounds lovely with the 2-1!  :)

Cheers bud!

This is awesome! Sounds great, glad to see/hear it running! Can't wait to see the seat/tank setup too. However, it does make me feel bad about the fact that my 350 has been sitting in boxes for the last two and a half years :o

haha hopefully my next post will inspire you to get back into the garage!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Nov 11, 2016, 16:32:43
Here's the tank & seat reveal, I hope you guys like it. Happy Friday!

Enjoy:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLjXdqKm18A



more pics to come, just got to edit them.

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: SF on Nov 11, 2016, 19:40:24
Love the layout of the bike man, very classy.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Green199 on Nov 12, 2016, 06:08:19
Well, damn. Nice colour sheme.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: CALfeRacer on Nov 12, 2016, 15:57:14
Wow!! Looks great! love the stripes on the tank, might have to borrow that idea ;)

I've been out in the garage working on stuff, but between school and the lack of money to do what I really want to with the 350 it just sits at the back of the list and collects dust. The 350 is what got me into cafe racers and customs in the first place back in high school, so I really want to do it justice with a proper budget and top quality parts so it turns out just how I want it. I've had it mostly planned out the last two years, just need to graduate and get a job so it can become a reality :o
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: tylerdb on Nov 12, 2016, 22:14:34
Pretty high level build for a "noob". Great work man would love to check it out if i ever venture that far east!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: JadusMotorcycleParts on Nov 14, 2016, 06:47:46
Very tasteful styling man.  Just the right balance of colour/detail without being 'too much'.  I have loved following from afar, mostly interested/impressed with the engine rebuild and modifications. 

You gonna dyno run it?  Would be a shame not to tune it to optimal with all that work into it.  You will pick up a lot of extra power than if you just did it by the seat of the pants ;)  Also very curious to see what kind of gains you get with all those sweet go fast bits  ;D
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: TJGM on Nov 14, 2016, 09:18:12
Wow !  I just netflixed these in one sitting ! Awesome job !

Cheers,
~T
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Nov 16, 2016, 16:50:43
Thanks for the kind words all! Really didn't know what to expect when it came to other peoples reactions, but I was pleasantly surprised. It's funny when you have an idea in your own head for so long without being able to show others you begin to wonder how it will be received.

Anyway, thanks again!

Here's a few pics I took of the bike on the street.. The Autumn colours were a blessing in disguise!

More to come but these will do for those who might not want to sit through the video.

What's next for the bike is that I still need to tune these carbs and mount the tachometer on the top triple clamp. I was able to find a bracket straight from motogadget and it was very reasonable and shipped all the way from Germany in about 3 or 4 days! Pics to come on that also.

Enjoy!

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Kamn on Nov 17, 2016, 08:42:24
Man that came together nicely! Well done
It will be nice to see you out riding that bad boy come the spring
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: yorkie350 on Nov 17, 2016, 08:58:07
Totally wicked Tony ,she's a stunner gotta be up there for BOTM i've got the nom ready bud ,get her tuned and ride while the weather's kind "IRIS gonna steal some hearts " ride safe ride proud bro
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Tune-A-Fish© on Nov 17, 2016, 09:03:03
Clean Scoot, I'd vote for it

(http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=63704.0;attach=182705;image)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: xb33bsa on Nov 17, 2016, 18:04:45
it looks great very clean nice paint
a couple issues that i see ,strictly functional,is the rear brake will never work well directly linked like that
 and the seat pan will hit the tire as will the lower corner of the box
you may never have that issue because those koni's look oversprung, the rear suspension is very stiff eh ?
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Nov 18, 2016, 07:57:07
it looks great very clean nice paint
a couple issues that i see ,strictly functional,is the rear brake will never work well directly linked like that
 and the seat pan will hit the tire as will the lower corner of the box
you may never have that issue because those koni's look oversprung, the rear suspension is very stiff eh ?
Thanks man! Actually I was very careful when I designed the battery box and believe it or not the wheel will never hit the corner of that box.. I made extra sure of that! As for the shocks, they are custom made to my specific measurements. I made sure the minimum travel was less than the total distance of when the rear wheel will make contact with the seat pan. As for the stiffness, no actually they are quite plush and comfortable! They're 'dial a ride' shocks so if I need to up the stiffness for those sweet northern Ontario roads I can do so.. right now they are sitting at the softest setting.

As for the rear brake it 'seems' to work just fine at the moment but when I first installed them I felt the stutter like everyone else. For some reason I am not getting that stutter anymore! I can't explain it. Perhaps I had the rear sets installed improperly before. Either way, I plan on modifying the stock rear brake arm over the winter. Thank you for the heads up though.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Nov 18, 2016, 07:59:58
Man that came together nicely! Well done
It will be nice to see you out riding that bad boy come the spring
Cheers Kam! Can't wait to roll with you guys in the spring! ✊
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Nov 18, 2016, 08:01:54
Totally wicked Tony ,she's a stunner gotta be up there for BOTM i've got the nom ready bud ,get her tuned and ride while the weather's kind "IRIS gonna steal some hearts " ride safe ride proud bro
Cheers bud!  Got the last bit of tuning to do this wknd and hopefully post a ride video to show shes road worthy. If not it'll have to be next spring as I'll be putting her away for winter tomorrow most likely. Appreciate your support man!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: xb33bsa on Nov 18, 2016, 15:57:00
Thanks man! Actually I was very careful when I designed the battery box and believe it or not the wheel will never hit the corner of that box.. I made extra sure of that! As for the shocks, they are custom made to my specific measurements. I made sure the minimum travel was less than the total distance of when the rear wheel will make contact with the seat pan. As for the stiffness, no actually they are quite plush and comfortable! They're 'dial a ride' shocks so if I need to up the stiffness for those sweet northern Ontario roads I can do so.. right now they are sitting at the softest setting.

As for the rear brake it 'seems' to work just fine at the moment but when I first installed them I felt the stutter like everyone else. For some reason I am not getting that stutter anymore! I can't explain it. Perhaps I had the rear sets installed improperly before. Either way, I plan on modifying the stock rear brake arm over the winter. Thank you for the heads up though.
thats awesome you got them set up for you !  i am glad you proved me wrong !but it just doesnt look like you have well over 4" to where the seat pan is, the axle and hence wheel tire travels about 15-20% further than the shocks stroke
so the only very simple foolproof way to know for sure is with a shock mounted no spring is best and strap it down hard to compress bumper
the rear brake, my point there is you have the suspension constantly yanking the brake pedal because the actuation point is so far from the pivot of the swingarm
for a safe and ergonomic brake pedal situation you also want to be able to adjust the pedal static position,and to be able to adjust the freeplay out of the system to a safe minumum
this is why the stock pedals always have an up stop
you can adjust the pedal position to be comfy and then the nut on the end of the brake rod is turned in to eliminate excess freeplay
but with the lashup you have an up stop would just mean a big bump that uses travel of swingarm/shocks  well it will put the brakes on for you ! besides it feels quite um unsettling having the brake pedal moving on its own
its a common fail so dont feel like the lone stranger, the bike is stunningly good
fix that issue and it will be much better thats all
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Nov 18, 2016, 16:07:33
thats awesome you got them set up for you !  i am glad you proved me wrong !but it just doesnt look like you have well over 4" to where the seat pan is, the axle and hence wheel tire travels about 15-20% further than the shocks stroke
so the only very simple foolproof way to know for sure is with a shock mounted no spring is best and strap it down hard to compress bumper
the rear brake, my point there is you have the suspension constantly yanking the brake pedal because the actuation point is so far from the pivot of the swingarm
for a safe and ergonomic brake pedal situation you also want to be able to adjust the pedal static position,and to be able to adjust the freeplay out of the system to a safe minumum
this is why the stock pedals always have an up stop
you can adjust the pedal position to be comfy and then the nut on the end of the brake rod is turned in to eliminate excess freeplay
but with the lashup you have an up stop would just mean a big bump that uses travel of swingarm/shocks  well it will put the brakes on for you ! besides it feels quite um unsettling having the brake pedal moving on its own
its a common fail so dont feel like the lone stranger, the bike is stunningly good
fix that issue and it will be much better thats all
Excellent point! Yes, I had been warned about the brake set up from a few members. There's a fix I'm sure you're aware of with modifying the original brake pedal. I'm definitely going to modify that over the winter and also do some wiring clean up and build a small and tasteful fiberglass seat cowl.

I never really even considered the swing arm moving the pedal for me.. that's pretty scary. Good lookin out man, I appreciate that. I'm sure I will find a few things once I get a good test ride in.. plan on doing that tmrw once I dial in these carbs.

Cheers!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: maddhatter on Nov 19, 2016, 05:38:55
,.

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Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: goldy on Nov 19, 2016, 11:49:01
Nice build! BZ on moving the brake and I think a seat cowl would go a long way to improving the lines.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: xb33bsa on Nov 19, 2016, 13:49:00
when your ready to lashup the brake,if you are open minded enough, i have a design worked up that is very  simple ,will work better than anything else thats ever been done ,in these situations,with rearsets, and will blow minds and it only requires one extra moving part
and the parts all are readilly available and requires zero "fabrication" ,and neither uses linkages, or rods
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: NoRiders on Nov 19, 2016, 15:35:13
You have to be so pleased with the outcome, beautiful bike fella. Tank decals are the biz.

I think a shortie rear mudguard would suit the overall style much better, matching the front guard and enhancing the rear seat area. Not sure how a cowl would sit to be honest :/
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Green199 on Nov 19, 2016, 16:51:59
when your ready to lashup the brake,if you are open minded enough, i have a design worked up that is very  simple ,will work better than anything else thats ever been done ,in these situations,with rearsets, and will blow minds and it only requires one extra moving part
and the parts all are readilly available and requires zero "fabrication" ,and neither uses linkages, or rods

You sound like Trump XB!  :P ;D Just kidding man!

You have to be so pleased with the outcome, beautiful bike fella. Tank decals are the biz.

I think a shortie rear mudguard would suit the overall style much better, matching the front guard and enhancing the rear seat area. Not sure how a cowl would sit to be honest :/


Ohh shorty rear mudguard and a tiny little cowl would look the bollocks!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: xb33bsa on Nov 19, 2016, 21:09:43
You sound like Trump XB!  :P ;D Just kidding man!


Ohh shorty rear mudguard and a tiny little cowl would look the bollocks!
lol i still dont  like the guy ,i sure aint gettin a trump stamp,but at least he has run many businesses into bankruptcy, lot more than you can say for any of the  filth in washington last 50 years 
actually the basis and function,of my brake activation design has been around for 1000 of years directly copies what ?
what do almost all airplanes ,as well as sailboats and lots of speed boats and bicycles and more, all have in common that is one of the most reliable,efficient, mechanical functions ever created ?
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: CALfeRacer on Nov 21, 2016, 17:59:16
XB, mind sharing that brake setup? I'd like to see it before I get to work on my 350 since I'm planning on putting rearsets on it.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Nov 21, 2016, 18:09:58
when your ready to lashup the brake,if you are open minded enough, i have a design worked up that is very  simple ,will work better than anything else thats ever been done ,in these situations,with rearsets, and will blow minds and it only requires one extra moving part
and the parts all are readilly available and requires zero "fabrication" ,and neither uses linkages, or rods
Ya I'd love to learn more about this design of yours!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: xb33bsa on Nov 21, 2016, 21:14:09
Ya I'd love to learn more about this design of yours!
it does require a good adjustable pedal up stop and ca strong return spring back at the lever on cam
then its just a cable going forward wrapping 180 up and over a deep groove puilly
the pulley mounted close to swinger pivot
if cable exits pully at swinger pivot centerline then its almost perfect
totally foolprpoof relible,.simple
the cable following close to the rod line you have now
think of mountain bike brakes and shifter deraillersclog and racing outboard motor hydroplanes and p51 mustangs all use cable and pulleys
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: CALfeRacer on Dec 05, 2016, 02:03:24
(http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20161205/213a3a2c8df688f31e2dd895c72cea22.jpg)
Congrats on the IG feature! Crazy to see this while scrolling through IG.


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Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: revel.motorcycles on Jan 09, 2017, 17:16:25
Cool build and great videos!  Thanks!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: LeDom on Jul 16, 2017, 21:55:53
Hey dude, crazy clean build congrats!
I scrolled the entire thread for an answer and coulnt find any.
How did you wire the rectifier and stator?
The diagram shows 2 yellow wires and some red ones but the actual parts have a lot more..

Please help me :D

Thanks!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jul 25, 2017, 08:53:39
Hey dude, crazy clean build congrats!
I scrolled the entire thread for an answer and coulnt find any.
How did you wire the rectifier and stator?
The diagram shows 2 yellow wires and some red ones but the actual parts have a lot more..

Please help me :D

Thanks!

Hey bud! Sorry for the late reply. When I originally saw the msg I couldn't access my wiring diagram to confirm. I just double checked the digram and bike. I have an after market stator and rectifier from Rick's Electric so this will be different from the stock unit. My stator has 2 black wires coming from it, I connected those to the 2 yellow wires from the regulator/rectifier then I connect the red wire from the reg/rec, through a fuse, to battery positive and the green wire directly to battery negative.

I hope this helps and thanks for the kind words.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on May 28, 2018, 16:52:54
Time for an update!! How's going around here at DTT?!?

I'm back and on the attack!

For those of you still on board, I have a pretty exciting update on the 350 (finally)! SHE'S ALLLLLLIIIVE and running nicely. I've been hustling this spring to get her completed and all my hard work has finally paid off. Last we left off I had her idling really well but went back to start her up without success last fall before winter storage. This spring I had a long list of items that needed attending to:
- Fix throttle or Install new throttle
- Check and re-time electronic ignition
- Re-Check valve clearances
- Remove after market alarm system as it was draining my battery
- Lube all cables
- Check air pressure in tires
- Cable/Idle sync carbs
- Check gas lines for proper flow
- Clean out fuel tank petcock, insure proper flow
- Install fuel tank
- Break-In engine
- Change oil/Clean oil slinger
- Finish carb tune/Plug chops
- Re-torque bolts on head
- Repair oil leak from stator cover (missing gasket! fixed easily when installed)

After completing all the tasks, she fired up and I took her for an engine break-in ride. It was just incredible! Best day of my life. I don't think I'll ever be able to explain what it was like to hear her open up. It was a huge relief for me to finally take her out on a ride and I can't wait to get back on it. She's incredibly light and nimble, just quick as a whip.

Last Fall I had started setting up the carbs, gas lines and was having problems with my throttle. Over the winter when I had some down time to think about it. I figured out that maybe my bar end mirror had something to do with the fact it was sticking. Sure enough my thoughts were correct. It seems that the rubber on the end of the grip was creating some friction on the mirror clamp and also since I had installed the cable end into the throttle sleeve so many times I had frayed the plastic on the sleeve, also creating friction. I replaced the entire throttle set up and this time I actually cut the end of the plastic throttle sleeve off so I was able to slide the throttle set up higher onto the bars. Doing this allowed for a small 2mm space to be created at the end of the grip between the grip and the mirror clamp. Throttle snapped back.. perfect! With that monkey off my back I was able to finish everything up with a slight amount of ease. It's funny but sometimes you just need to take a step back and regroup. Can't stress that enough to those of you going at this for the first time. It's funny how a small wall can really discourage you.

Another note is that my gas lines and tank seem to be working fine this spring. I was concerned that I may have had an airflow issue on the tank cap but after some inspection and cleaning it seems to be working now and the gas lines are flowing. Hopefully it stays that way.

A real concern I have is that the engine is running really hot!! I have a feeling this is somewhat normal and if anyone can confirm or deny who has a similar engine set up to mine that would be helpful. After the first break-in ride I changed the oil and I swear you could have fried wings in it!! (well not quite, but still). The side covers were also crazy hot! My next step is do complete a series of plug chops to make sure she's running optimally. I really don't want to blow this engine. Also, it was extremely humid during this test ride so I'm a bit nervous the bike won't run as well in lower temps. Going to have to go over my tuning manual to refresh my memory as to why but if anyone cares to explain, please feel free. I'm a bit rusty on the info since I have looked at the manual since last November.

Eventually, when I save up a little bit of money I plan on taking the bike on a Dyno to get a read out. That's down the road somewhere. As for now I have to put 500km's on her close to home to work out all the kinks, then I'll feel confident to ride her an hour home to my house.

I'll have a tuning video coming shortly and I'll go through what I ended up using in the carb set up. For now, enjoy the First Ride video I made and please excuse all the foul language. I was pretty excited lol.

https://youtu.be/ib0SzdAVy80
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: goldy on May 29, 2018, 10:51:17
Good to see it one the road! :)
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Maritime on May 29, 2018, 11:57:33
Nice work, she's a looker for sure!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Sonreir on May 29, 2018, 12:46:03
Right on!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jun 18, 2018, 15:58:58
With an update on the bike, besides having small recharging issues the bike is running well. The battery is dying while riding. I took her for another test run on Saturday and she still feels sweet. The m-unit allows for the headlight to be turned off, so while riding I had it off and the battery seemed to maintain voltage after both test rips so this is making me think I have a charging system issue. Initially I thought it was my battery bc I had severely drained it once before, but it is infact recharging. This is a bit more of a pain in the butt because replacing that system is going to be a way bigger job than just doing a battery swap! Next time out I'm going to check the fuse in my reg/rec circuit, if that is still intact I'll test to make sure the charging system is operating by disconnecting it from the battery and putting a tester on the neg and pos connections to see what I get. If the fuse is intact and it's not producing power I'm going to have some bigger problems on my hands (read: more expensive). I'm nervous that my rotor may be toast. Any advice on how I would know for sure??

I still have to complete a few plug chops to make sure she's running optimally. I am still slightly concerned about the engine temp after riding, she seems to run really hot and I want to avoid blowing this engine at all costs. I'm sure it's normal to be hot but I'm not sure how hot. I bought one of those fancy laser temp readers so I'll take a few measurements on the case, check the plugs at different throttle positions and report back. I may just need to do some slight tweaks on the carbs yet.

I'm working my butt off to get her ready for a motorcycle meet in July where I can finally show her off. Planning to make a little video on that that I'll be posting.

Until next time! Also looking for some friends for BOTM votes for July once I get her in good shape! ;) ;D ;D
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Sonreir on Jun 18, 2018, 16:41:15
What wattage headlight are you running? 35W is about the maximum you want on a Honda twin and you should go even lower if you're running 3 Ohm coils. My recommendation is one of the 20W H4 LED bulbs we have on our website. They're very bright (55W halogen equivalent) but with even less draw than stock. Also, unless you have a specific reason to do so, I would stick with 5 Ohm coils.

As far as temps go, try to measure right at the spark plug hole. You should be around 175°C and I would definitely start to worry if you get up to 200°C. Measurements should be taken at WOT, so may be difficult to accomplish without specialized equipment.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: teazer on Jun 18, 2018, 17:05:39
............, check the plugs at different throttle positions and report back. I may just need to do some slight tweaks on the carbs yet..............


No can do.  The only plug chop that actually tells you anything about jetting is WOT under load.  At anything less than flat out, all you are reading is plug temperature and thinking it's a measure of jetting.  It's not. At less than WOT you may well see changes in color on a plug chop but since the plugs are not at self cleaning temperature, what are they telling you? The answer, in general, is not much aout jetting that you can interpret and act upon.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jun 18, 2018, 17:28:58
What wattage headlight are you running? 35W is about the maximum you want on a Honda twin and you should go even lower if you're running 3 Ohm coils. My recommendation is one of the 20W H4 LED bulbs we have on our website. They're very bright (55W halogen equivalent) but with even less draw than stock. Also, unless you have a specific reason to do so, I would stick with 5 Ohm coils.

As far as temps go, try to measure right at the spark plug hole. You should be around 175°C and I would definitely start to worry if you get up to 200°C. Measurements should be taken at WOT, so may be difficult to accomplish without specialized equipment.

35w eh?! This is the headlight I purchased (http://"https://cognitomoto.com/collections/lighting/products/lsl-6-5-headlight"). "H4 60/55 watt bulb with internal running light".. oof! Now I'm a bit concerned. I'm positive I can just replace the bulb though, correct?

Thanks for the advice on temps.

The only plug chop that actually tells you anything about jetting is WOT under load.  At anything less than flat out, all you are reading is plug temperature and thinking it's a measure of jetting.  It's not. At less than WOT you may well see changes in color on a plug chop but since the plugs are not at self cleaning temperature, what are they telling you? The answer, in general, is not much aout jetting that you can interpret and act upon.

I didn't mean to say I would take a temperature reading during the plug chops, I meant I would visually look at the plugs at different throttle positions to see if running lean or rich, etc.

Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Sonreir on Jun 18, 2018, 17:34:44
35w eh?! This is the headlight I purchased (http://"https://cognitomoto.com/collections/lighting/products/lsl-6-5-headlight"). "H4 60/55 watt bulb with internal running light".. oof! Now I'm a bit concerned. I'm positive I can just replace the bulb though, correct?

Yup. Just swap out the bulb for something with lower wattage and you should be good to. The earlier issue you were encountering was that the bike was just pulling more electricity than your alternator could produce.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jun 19, 2018, 10:31:04
Yup. Just swap out the bulb for something with lower wattage and you should be good to. The earlier issue you were encountering was that the bike was just pulling more electricity than your alternator could produce.

Damn, ok this makes sense. I hope that is the problem.

Can you check out this light and tell me if it's the correct bulb? it would be the 12V-35/35w one: https://fortnine.ca/en/eiko-quartz-halogen-bulb-h4-9003-p43t

Would I loose my highbeam though??

Also, I should remind you that I'm running the Rick's Electric Hot Shot charging system which states: " The kit will put out approximately 150 watts and power a 55 watt headlight if the customers rotor has not been compromised."

Thoughts???
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: jpmobius on Jun 19, 2018, 11:12:15
The only plug chop that actually tells you anything about jetting is WOT under load.  At anything less than flat out, all you are reading is plug temperature and thinking it's a measure of jetting.  It's not. At less than WOT you may well see changes in color on a plug chop but since the plugs are not at self cleaning temperature, what are they telling you? The answer, in general, is not much about jetting that you can interpret and act upon.

You can take this to the bank.  Pretty much everything else in getting your carbs to behave like you want is a trial and error process determined by how the bike drives.  This is because under normal driving, you have the throttles nearly closed a lot of the time and otherwise constantly speeding up or slowing down.  Even if you could get a useful reading at a partial throttle opening, it would be of only anecdotal value because in reality you are more interested in transitional performance - throttle response.  Certainly it is a tricky (but hopefully fun!) task to ride your bike, try to decide where it is too lean or too rich and then figure what parts need to be swapped to effect the change you think you need, but rewarding if you persevere.  Get your main jets right first, and then PLEASE leave them alone.  Don't tune your bike with the mains.  Never forget that your so called air cooled engine is in reality, principally liquid cooled by the liquid fuel changing into a gas before it is used as an energy source.  In general this is why in practice you need more fuel than what is required for the correct theoretical air fuel ratio (among other factors).
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Sonreir on Jun 19, 2018, 11:52:11
Damn, ok this makes sense. I hope that is the problem.

Can you check out this light and tell me if it's the correct bulb? it would be the 12V-35/35w one: https://fortnine.ca/en/eiko-quartz-halogen-bulb-h4-9003-p43t

Would I loose my highbeam though??

Also, I should remind you that I'm running the Rick's Electric Hot Shot charging system which states: " The kit will put out approximately 150 watts and power a 55 watt headlight if the customers rotor has not been compromised."

Thoughts???

That bulb will work and so long as it's labeled as H4, you won't lose your high beam. The H4 format includes both high and low. I don't know if you'll be super thrilled with the brightness level, but it should do the trick.

As far as the rotor comment goes, at this point all of our rotors are at least a little compromised. They lose their magnetism over time. I've seen some bikes that can barely hold a charge at highway speeds and others that will charge at idle. Seems to be a bit hit and miss. Maybe try to grab a new rotor from eBay and see if that helps? Generally, the Rick's system should be good enough to run a 55W bulb without any other modifications.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jun 19, 2018, 12:38:18
You can take this to the bank.  Pretty much everything else in getting your carbs to behave like you want is a trial and error process determined by how the bike drives.  This is because under normal driving, you have the throttles nearly closed a lot of the time and otherwise constantly speeding up or slowing down.  Even if you could get a useful reading at a partial throttle opening, it would be of only anecdotal value because in reality you are more interested in transitional performance - throttle response.  Certainly it is a tricky (but hopefully fun!) task to ride your bike, try to decide where it is too lean or too rich and then figure what parts need to be swapped to effect the change you think you need, but rewarding if you persevere.  Get your main jets right first, and then PLEASE leave them alone.  Don't tune your bike with the mains.  Never forget that your so called air cooled engine is in reality, principally liquid cooled by the liquid fuel changing into a gas before it is used as an energy source.  In general this is why in practice you need more fuel than what is required for the correct theoretical air fuel ratio (among other factors).

You're making a lot of sense, thanks for this info.


That bulb will work and so long as it's labeled as H4, you won't lose your high beam. The H4 format includes both high and low. I don't know if you'll be super thrilled with the brightness level, but it should do the trick.

As far as the rotor comment goes, at this point all of our rotors are at least a little compromised. They lose their magnetism over time. I've seen some bikes that can barely hold a charge at highway speeds and others that will charge at idle. Seems to be a bit hit and miss. Maybe try to grab a new rotor from eBay and see if that helps? Generally, the Rick's system should be good enough to run a 55W bulb without any other modifications.

Thanks for all your help with this. I feel like my rotor may be toast bc the Hot Shot charging system is stated to handle the 55w bulb with no issues. Therefore, either my fuse coming from my reg/rec is blown, my rotor is done or the charging system is malfunctioning. I will check the fuse next time I'm in the garage, if that's intact I am going to assume the rotor is shot bc the charging system is brand new.

Sonreir, would you happen to know what size of a flywheel puller will remove that rotor from the end of the crankshaft?

Thanks again for all your responses.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Sonreir on Jun 19, 2018, 12:59:27
Sonreir, would you happen to know what size of a flywheel puller will remove that rotor from the end of the crankshaft?

I think it's either M12 or M14. It's the same as the rear axle.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jun 19, 2018, 15:42:57
I think it's either M12 or M14. It's the same as the rear axle.

Thanks, I figured it out.. M16x1.5mm

Thanks again for all your help on this bud!!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: LiamG6 on Jun 20, 2018, 09:43:48
You're making a lot of sense, thanks for this info.


Thanks for all your help with this. I feel like my rotor may be toast bc the Hot Shot charging system is stated to handle the 55w bulb with no issues. Therefore, either my fuse coming from my reg/rec is blown, my rotor is done or the charging system is malfunctioning. I will check the fuse next time I'm in the garage, if that's intact I am going to assume the rotor is shot bc the charging system is brand new.

Sonreir, would you happen to know what size of a flywheel puller will remove that rotor from the end of the crankshaft?

Thanks again for all your responses.

Found your thread here, more active than HT. If your bike charged fine with your headlight off then your reg/rec fuse is fine.

I'd test with that 35w head light and then move on to testing another rotor.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jun 20, 2018, 10:59:21
Found your thread here, more active than HT. If your bike charged fine with your headlight off then your reg/rec fuse is fine.

I'd test with that 35w head light and then move on to testing another rotor.

Hey Buddy, just read your other post as well on HT. Anyway, I honestly don't think it's the bulb. The manufacturer states that the Rick's Electric Hot Shot charging system is fully capable of running a 55w light. It outputs much more power than the stock stator & reg/rec. So it narrows it down to just a few factors. Heading to the garage in a few days to do some tests and will report back. Thanks for your replies.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: LiamG6 on Jun 20, 2018, 22:13:39
Hey Buddy, just read your other post as well on HT. Anyway, I honestly don't think it's the bulb. The manufacturer states that the Rick's Electric Hot Shot charging system is fully capable of running a 55w light. It outputs much more power than the stock stator & reg/rec. So it narrows it down to just a few factors. Heading to the garage in a few days to do some tests and will report back. Thanks for your replies.

It's fully capable of running a 55w bulb if the only change is the 55w bulb and the hot shot stator and everything else is stock and in good condition, if anything else is changed on the system, then it needs to be tested. You can probably get everything sorted and be able to run the 55w bulb, but it might be harder and more costly than just switching to a 35w bulb. I would try to minimize the load on the charging system, move to LED turn signal, brake light and tail lights if you haven't already, drop to 35w HL if need be, find out if anything else is drawing a lot of current. Whats your ignition system, do you know how much current it needs?

A lithium battery needs to have 13.2v or higher to charge, if you can get your system above that point as close to idle rpm as possible then you are golden
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: MiniatureNinja on Jun 21, 2018, 03:07:10
rick's also makes a hotshot rotor which is absolutely epic for power output.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Sonreir on Jun 21, 2018, 12:19:16
rick's also makes a hotshot rotor which is absolutely epic for power output.

You got a link? I thought they only did the stator.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: irk miller on Jun 21, 2018, 12:34:55
You got a link? I thought they only did the stator.
https://ricksmotorsportelectrics.com/New-Hot-Shot-Series-Honda-Rotor-41_100H
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jun 21, 2018, 15:05:48
already in the mail! I'll keep you posted.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: LiamG6 on Jun 22, 2018, 00:03:23
https://ricksmotorsportelectrics.com/New-Hot-Shot-Series-Honda-Rotor-41_100H

Now that I didn't know they made, that is great, all potential issues with other used stators aren't a factor with a newly magnetized rotor.

Between this and the hot shot stator you should be sweet!
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: MiniatureNinja on Jun 22, 2018, 15:00:44
You got a link? I thought they only did the stator.
It's pretty new product, like maybe a few months ago they started them
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Saturdays Wrench on Jun 23, 2018, 19:24:55
(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180623/df78a1dbb3e4620631ff5d10ed5e8808.heic)

There’s yer friggen problem right there! Replaced and battery charges no problem. Not even sure how this sucker blew tbh. Anyway, I suppose I didn’t need to spend the money on that rotor but it’ll compliment the rest of my Ricks Hot Shot charging system nicely and it was an upgrade I was bound to get down the road anyways.

Either way I totally forgot that fuse was even in there until one of you guys mentioned it in the thread. Either way she’s running great now and the battery seems to be recharging without issue even with the headlight on.

The rotor swap will be done in a few weeks possibly. Or I may just leave her alone for now and enjoy the heck out of her for the rest of the summer... ya that sounds like a good idea.

She’ll be making an appearance and the Toronto motosocial on the 1st Wednesday of July if anyone’s from Toronto and wants to come check her out. The big moment will be the hour ride from my parents garage back to my place in the city. Fingers crossed peeps! Will report back once she’s home safe and sound as a pound.

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180623/e8bbaf95290980db176823fefcb1b9c8.heic)


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Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: Maritime on Jun 24, 2018, 09:38:06
Nice, love the simple fixes, Carry a spare fise for a bit in case it pops again.  If it does you'll need to track down the cause.
Title: Re: 1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)
Post by: MiniatureNinja on Jun 24, 2018, 12:33:18
It's funny how the simplest things can sneak right by us. Definitely carry a spare fuse. As for the rotor, take that up in winter when you can't ride it.

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