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Author Topic: 1972 Yamaha DS7  (Read 26860 times)

Offline Redbird

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Re: 1972 Yamaha DS7
« Reply #30 on: Jul 12, 2016, 16:00:57 »
Very interesting. Pedal effort never really occurred to me in that respect. I figured the lengths of the brake pedal/shift lever were dictated more by the ergonomics of the oem footpeg location, and less by operational effort. And basically what you're saying is, by keeping the driving arm consistent with the driven arm, I've applied the 2006 R6's rearset operational effort to the 1972 DS7's chassis/engine... correct?
It'll be a week or two before I get the bodywork back and I can actually ride the bike, but I can definitely do some math this weekend and see how far from the mark I am. I'll keep ya posted ;)

And that info deserves to be a "Sticky" on the rearset forum!
« Last Edit: Jul 12, 2016, 16:03:08 by Redbird »
When you are Dead, you don't know that you are Dead. It is difficult only for Others.

It is the same when you are Stupid.

Offline Ryan Stecken

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Re: 1972 Yamaha DS7
« Reply #31 on: Jul 12, 2016, 16:08:37 »
Mmm i smell 2 stroke!following along!

Offline Mr.E

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Re: 1972 Yamaha DS7
« Reply #32 on: Jul 12, 2016, 16:11:04 »
Done yet?

Offline Redbird

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Re: 1972 Yamaha DS7
« Reply #33 on: Jul 12, 2016, 16:11:48 »
Closer than you are :P
When you are Dead, you don't know that you are Dead. It is difficult only for Others.

It is the same when you are Stupid.


Offline Redbird

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Re: 1972 Yamaha DS7
« Reply #35 on: Jul 12, 2016, 16:22:39 »
When you are Dead, you don't know that you are Dead. It is difficult only for Others.

It is the same when you are Stupid.


Offline Redbird

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Re: 1972 Yamaha DS7
« Reply #37 on: Jul 15, 2016, 16:16:58 »
Update on the lever ratio situation.
On the brake side the R6 lever is 52% shorter than DS7 lever, and (as mentioned earlier) the crank arms are even at 100%.
The shifter side is much closer, with the R6 lever being 68% shorter than the DS7 lever, and the crank arms being at 77% (driving arm being shorter than the driven arm). Not sure I follow the calculation needed to determine how that effects the force needed though.
It'll likely be atleast another week before I get the bodywork back and am able to test ride.
When you are Dead, you don't know that you are Dead. It is difficult only for Others.

It is the same when you are Stupid.

Offline jpmobius

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Re: 1972 Yamaha DS7
« Reply #38 on: Jul 15, 2016, 18:45:03 »
Easy.  Except I'm not certain about what you mean by 52% shorter.  I'll assume you mean the R6 lever is 52% as long as the original, in other words just slightly more than half as long of the original and that  the R6 shift lever is a bit more than 2/3rds the length of stock. If that is the case, make the drive crank arm 52% as long as the driven crank arm on the brake, and the drive crank arm of the shifter 68% as long as the driven arm.  Set the shifter linkage arms up parallel with the connecting rod at 90 degrees to start with - you can adjust the angles and rod length later if you want to change the behavior.  Set the brake up the same, but before you do, fully engage the brake - at the brake itself so you can set up the linkage in the fully applied brake mode.  You want the pedal to be in the position where you want your foot to be when you have the brake strongly applied.  Then set up the linkage with parallel arms and 90 degree rod angles.
Mobius


On a long enough timeline, the survival rate for everyone drops to zero.

1973 RD350 Yamaha build  http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=66498.0

Offline Redbird

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Re: 1972 Yamaha DS7
« Reply #39 on: Jul 15, 2016, 19:03:50 »
I'll assume you mean the R6 lever is 52% as long as the original...
Yes, that's what I meant. Thanks, I'll keep ya posted ;)
When you are Dead, you don't know that you are Dead. It is difficult only for Others.

It is the same when you are Stupid.