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Author Topic: Home made shop tools, equipment, tips, and tricks.  (Read 12626 times)

Offline sharperdill

  • Posts: 109
Home made shop tools, equipment, tips, and tricks.
« on: Aug 14, 2010, 17:32:26 »
Probably a waste of time and effort to get this going, but I come across a few things now and then and if no one else contributes, I will.

The idea of this post is to have a collection of home made tools that we all use and maybe some plans for future tools we would like to build.  I figured why not put equipment in the mix, and other tips and tricks that may not be known to all of us (like using a little WD-40 on buffing wheels).

What gave me the idea was a spanner wrench that Staffy posted.  Sometimes we are not able to aquire the funds to get a tool, but we have the skills, equipment and materials to make them.
« Last Edit: Aug 16, 2010, 18:12:33 by sharperdill »

Offline sharperdill

  • Posts: 109
Re: Home made shop tools, equipment, tips, and tricks.
« Reply #1 on: Aug 14, 2010, 17:48:39 »
I guess I will get the ball rolling with this.  I found this disk/spool sander on the Knucklebuster blogs.





Offline arsey

  • Posts: 281
Re: Home made shop tools, equipment, tips, and tricks.
« Reply #2 on: Aug 14, 2010, 21:56:49 »
I remember reading that someone here had made a bench grinder from a washing machine?
If anyone wants to chime in on that, feel free
build, site, quote

Offline DrJ

  • Posts: 4126
Re: Home made shop tools, equipment, tips, and tricks.
« Reply #3 on: Aug 14, 2010, 22:33:34 »
I remember reading that someone here had made a bench grinder from a washing machine?
If anyone wants to chime in on that, feel free

Um, bench grinders are like how much at the store? Maybe $40? Is it really worth making one yourself?

Offline CMHN

  • Posts: 49
  • Ride it like you stole it.
    • My Blog
Re: Home made shop tools, equipment, tips, and tricks.
« Reply #4 on: Aug 15, 2010, 01:01:54 »



Made this to save room in my cramped shop.   I'm able to pull it out to the middle when I want to work on it and push it into a corner when I'm not.   Not much more than 2X4 frame with 5/8 plywood on top.  It has 4 swivel casters to make it easy to turn around corners.

Offline CrescentSon

  • Posts: 2423
Re: Home made shop tools, equipment, tips, and tricks.
« Reply #5 on: Aug 15, 2010, 01:16:46 »
Is it really worth making one yourself?

Always.
"I hated hipsters before it was cool." -Sonreier

"Lifes a bitch when your trying to sell gold bars to beggars" -VonYinzer

"To say that ALL cafe racers are the same degree of ho hum is like saying that finger banging a fisher price piano is on par with listening to Beethoven." -Kanticoy

Offline KeninIowa

  • Posts: 63
  • frmly IAGSXR
Re: Home made shop tools, equipment, tips, and tricks.
« Reply #6 on: Aug 15, 2010, 06:29:52 »
Engine stand:









Engo

Offline jay_kent

  • Posts: 1297
  • 1979 cb650
    • Cafe build blog
Re: Home made shop tools, equipment, tips, and tricks.
« Reply #7 on: Aug 15, 2010, 11:22:13 »
Fork Nut tool for Honda CBs or other bikes

This is for the Socket head nut at the top of the forks

Take a bolt with a 17mm head or whatever size fits your bike. Then Weld it to a spare 1/2" drive 9/16" socket. Voila your new tool

The Horse BC magazine is to credit for this one.
DTT build thread - here
More pics at my Cafe build blog - Here

"And yeah David...you're pretty much bugshit nuts just like the rest of us." ~Swagger

Offline CrescentSon

  • Posts: 2423
Re: Home made shop tools, equipment, tips, and tricks.
« Reply #8 on: Aug 15, 2010, 13:41:33 »
Stolen from $50 Mod Thread
Shock adjuster tool. Cost about 50cents (maybe less) for a bit of scrap steel and wear and tear on tools....

I sat my ass on the bike last night and it hurt because the bloody shocks i've got for it were wound up to suit a mastodon or humback whale or something.  That pissed me off as i don't have a spring adjuster tool.  I went onto ebay and after exclaiming "How much do they want for that chunk of steel?" i decided to make my own.
Start of with the trusty piece of scrap steel you've been using to build all the stuff on your bike.  I think this stuff is about 3-4mm thick.  On it you need to mark out your rough shape.  The think to keep in mind is most of these tools you'll see have the key (the bit that goes into the hole on the shock) around 135 degrees from the heel (the bit that joins the handle to the inside curve).  That is so the handle will "pull into" the shock and cause it to turn rather than slip out.  I made up a roughly 35mm radius which is about the same as the shock.


No metal jigsaw blade at hand?  Haven't gone and splashed out on a dremel yet?  Never fear.  Drill some small holes (not too close to the radius) along the curve.  Follow this by drilling these out with a bigger diameter so the holes join together.


Cut out the rest roughly with an angle grinder


finish of with a flap disc, file, bench wheel, whatever you have.  I held down my grinder upside down on the bench and used it like a grinding wheel (but i don't endorse this technique ;) ) to get all the rough edges out.  I ended up having to take a lot more out of the heel to get it right.  Just do a bit then check it, a bit more then check it until it comes out right.


I now have rear suspension instead of a spine breaking system.

_____________________________________________________________________

Seeing as how DIY tools are in here this is my valve spring compressor
Being the kind of guy who has various "stuff" laying around and little $$ I didn't want to spend much on a valve spring compressor to work on my Cyl heads. I fabbed this and had the heads apart in less than an hour... Total cost $0

Parts used, 2 thick flat washers the same size as the spring retainer and a piece of round stock.



Cut the round stock to two equal sizes and tack weld to one washer then the other. I then put it in a vice to hold square and finished the welds.




Use a C-clamp with the new tool to compress the spring by putting the pivot foot at the threaded portion against the valve face and the tool on the spring retainer, compress and remove the keepers then slowly loosen the C-clamp.




_____________________________________________________________________

Homemade Spring Compressor


I was tired of looking for a place to compress my springs back onto the shocks. I found a place who'd do it for $20, but I thought to myself, "Heck, I can probably make something less than $20 that I can use over and over again." So I made this spring compressor and only spent $12. It is VERY VERY easy to make.

Here are the materials you need:
- 7 in. of 2x4
- 9 in. of 1/8th in. x 2 in. steel flat bar. (You can use 3/16ths thickness if you wish)
- Two (at least) 1.5 feet of 3/8th dia threaded Rod. I got two 2 ft rods for about $3 for both.
- Six 3/8th in. Nuts
- Six 3/8th in. Washers

I already had some 2x4 wood laying around along with the washers, so all I needed were the other stuff.



Cut a 7 in. section out of the 2x4. Next you need to put a notch in the middle of the 2x4 where the spring will sit. I used a mallet and a flathead screw driver to chip away at the wood. Then you need to measure how wide you want the rods to sit from the middle. Just make sure it's big enough to fit the shock in. Cut a 9 in. section of the 1/8th in. x 2 in. steel flat bar and measure accordingly where the holes should be. Make sure you drill 3/8th holes in the wood STRAIGHT!



Use a dremel to cut a wide enough slit in the middle for the shock. File and sand the edges once you're done cutting.



Next, insert the threaded rod in both holes and secure it to the 2x4 with washers and nuts.




NOTE: EXCUSE MY UGLY SPRINGS! Now, put the flat bar on the rods and put a washer and nut on each rod. I put duct tape to further protect the springs, even though they're banged up as hell.  Compress the spring by tightening each nut. After that, it's pretty straight forward. When using this, the 1/8th flat bar bent when I was compressing the second springs. REMEMBER, this compressor works best when you can get the flat bar in between coil/loop 3 and 4 on the spring. Just place the bar closest to the top of the spring and it shouldn't require much to get the seats in. You also don't need to clamp it upright. You can lay it on the floor and compress the springs.





Done!



"I hated hipsters before it was cool." -Sonreier

"Lifes a bitch when your trying to sell gold bars to beggars" -VonYinzer

"To say that ALL cafe racers are the same degree of ho hum is like saying that finger banging a fisher price piano is on par with listening to Beethoven." -Kanticoy

Offline Garage Rat

  • Posts: 2758
Re: Home made shop tools, equipment, tips, and tricks.
« Reply #9 on: Aug 15, 2010, 15:13:27 »
When installing those stupid circlips on your honda pistons after cleaning them up and replacing the rings, Stick a bolt through your wrist pin with a washer on the head end and a nut on the other. Make sure the OD of the bolt shaft is larger than the open portion of the circlip so that when you try to put your circlip on with needle nose pliers and drop it twenty times its not going to fall in the bowels of your engine but wont fall any further then the bolt that goes through it.
STFU and Ride!

http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=13948.0

Classic and Custom: Repair, Restoration and Fabrication!

http://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/292337884115268/

Offline sharperdill

  • Posts: 109
Re: Home made shop tools, equipment, tips, and tricks.
« Reply #10 on: Aug 16, 2010, 11:05:15 »
I found these bench grinder plans.


Offline Garage_guy_chris

  • Posts: 207
Re: Home made shop tools, equipment, tips, and tricks.
« Reply #11 on: Aug 18, 2010, 01:35:37 »
Got a couple,

Sand Blast cabinet.



Sheet metal brake







1971 Honda CB450

Offline biker_reject

  • Posts: 2094
Re: Home made shop tools, equipment, tips, and tricks.
« Reply #12 on: Aug 18, 2010, 14:50:36 »
Engine stand and sheet metal brake!  Wow! 8)  I'm too embarrassed to show my home made stuff!  But, I have made a "tire changing station", wheel balancer, bead breaker, fork clamp, and axle removal tool.
« Last Edit: Aug 18, 2010, 14:54:10 by biker_reject »
"The light that burns brightest, burns half as long."  from Lao Tzu and Bladerunner :-)
cb750 DOHC '79
XV750 Twisted Cafe
KZ400 Cafe

Offline sharperdill

  • Posts: 109
Re: Home made shop tools, equipment, tips, and tricks.
« Reply #13 on: Aug 18, 2010, 18:05:11 »
I most definitely want to see that sheet metal brake when its completed.


Engine stand and sheet metal brake!  Wow! 8)  I'm too embarrassed to show my home made stuff!  But, I have made a "tire changing station", wheel balancer, bead breaker, fork clamp, and axle removal tool.

I would like to see them, no matter how good or bad the workmanship.  I am curious about your wheel balancer, is it a static or dynamic balancer?
« Last Edit: Aug 18, 2010, 18:10:12 by sharperdill »

Offline CMHN

  • Posts: 49
  • Ride it like you stole it.
    • My Blog
Re: Home made shop tools, equipment, tips, and tricks.
« Reply #14 on: Aug 18, 2010, 22:46:48 »
Great thread,   Im loving it. ;D