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Author Topic: NEW MEMBERS - Read this - I'm sorry, but c'mon people.  (Read 77467 times)

Offline JoeFro70

  • Posts: 14
Re: NEW MEMBERS - Read this - I'm sorry, but c'mon people.
« Reply #120 on: Apr 12, 2013, 20:11:23 »
Whew, I haven't read this entire thread, but what I have read makes me feel much more at ease about asking for some advice on here. First time owner and I bought a pretty decent, but still 34 year old bike that will need a lot of $hit replaced. I am no real mechanic, and will be buying tools as well as parts along the way. No where near a hipster, but I like projects, always wanted a motorcycle, and fell in love with cafes because they have the mystique to me of both a custom Hog and high performance street bike! So, all that being said, I shall peruse for answers because I am sure some one before me has asked or was nice enough to share a similar experience, and if I can't find an answer, I'll ask.
I think I bit off more than I can chew.

Offline The Wheel

  • Posts: 48
Re: NEW MEMBERS - Read this - I'm sorry, but c'mon people.
« Reply #121 on: Apr 20, 2013, 13:12:50 »
Thanks for the advice.  As a new poster it can be a bit intimidating at first.  Definitely  a newbie at this.  I've found that 90% of the time the answer I'm looking for has been answered a few times already which explains the low post numbers even though I'm on here every other day.  From what I've seen, people on here are willing to give you the benefit of the doubt and help out where they can as long as you're open to constructive criticism.  I'll do my best not to be "that guy".
1977 CB550F

Offline DeepSeaWolf

  • Posts: 11
Re: NEW MEMBERS - Read this - I'm sorry, but c'mon people.
« Reply #122 on: May 05, 2013, 13:16:17 »
Well said!


This rant is most certainly not directed at any person specifically, and is also not meant to get anyone up in arms. That said, I've noticed a few things amongst the vintage bike set that have really started to irk me.

It's not the usual "stupid hipsters" or "they want how much for a cb750?" stuff though. Really, I'd like to think that most people here are above the petty annoyances of this hobby.

First off, the phrase "fuck the haters". Ok, I get it. Sometimes people are dicks. Sometimes people will talk shit on your bike no matter what you do. Those people suck. But when folks spend their time to show concern about your safety, or point out a possible better way of doing things... That's far from hate. Why don't we stop acting like insolent children and listen? I know it sucks when you put your all into something and someone points out that it may not work. It's a bummer. But before you get all riled up and decide that the person telling you that there's an issue is an asshole, LISTEN for a minute. You might pick something up... I know I do overtime I let my brain do the thinking and not my ego.

Secondly, you won't get all the answers by asking the same question 1000 times. Again, listen... And maybe more importantly, try. Break shit. Cut it up. Get dirty. Get bloody. I'm really guilty of second guessing myself personally. Because of this I hesitate to dive into shit. That's lame. The times when I tell myself to quit being a pussy and just do it are the most rewarding times I've ever had. Yeah, sometimes I fuck up. Sometimes I waste good parts and good money. The end result is ALWAYS way better than if I'd just phoned it in though. Always.

That brings us to number three...

You can't do it all. Nobody can. That's a fact of life and a fact of motorcycle building. There's always going to he a time when you need a hand. Be it help from a more experienced welder, engine builder, painter, whatever. There will come a point where it has to happen. Be respectful of that fact. It shows your humanity (something so many forget) and keeps you in touch with the outside world. If you've convinced yourself that you can do it all, you're going to lose. Plain and simple.

Online beachcomber

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Re: NEW MEMBERS - Read this - I'm sorry, but c'mon people.
« Reply #123 on: May 11, 2013, 07:18:58 »

That is a bad attitude. Look at Mr. Britten from down under who really did make a motorcycle from scratch. I have been paid professionally to bend pipe, do electrical work, run machine tools paint and weld. Anyone can learn to do all that stuff if they want to. Motorcycles are very simple machines that anyone can learn to repair or build from scratch. The only limitation might be space or money. I don't have the room for specialized machine tools like a crank grinding machine, and since that sort of work is rarely needed I am willing to farm that out. Building up roller cranks and balancing single and twin cylinder cranks can be easily and competently done at home with very simple tools. Look at Bert Munro who made his own pistons at home etc..
 
  You can do anything as far as motorcycles go for sure. It may not be practical to, but if there is the will then there is a way.
 
   

Here's a little homework for you ....... simple job been around for centuries - make a set of roadwheels [ not assemble a pile of parts ] - oh and that's the kind with a rim, spokes and a hub.

Hmmmmmmmmmmmm - not worth the effort eh when you can buy them ready made - like a lot of stuff. Only the degree.

BTW - the current "Classic Racer" magazine has a really good article about Britten together with a personal interview.

Innovator - certainly, make everything himself  - nahhh
"if at first you don't succeed, you've already been a failure once"

" we're not going back to the sixties - we never left "

"yep, nostalgia ain't what it used to be"

"I used to be indecisive - now I'm not so sure"

Offline nixon

  • Posts: 84
Re: NEW MEMBERS - Read this - I'm sorry, but c'mon people.
« Reply #124 on: May 18, 2013, 21:17:23 »
Valid points of OP..  I think it's vital to have a crack..if you fail, take a break. reassess. Try again..if still baffled, repeat. Then ask for help!  And definitely leave some things to masters..respect their skills..and range of tools!

Online beachcomber

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Re: NEW MEMBERS - Read this - I'm sorry, but c'mon people.
« Reply #125 on: May 29, 2013, 11:42:32 »
Thanks for the advice.  As a new poster it can be a bit intimidating at first.  Definitely  a newbie at this.  I've found that 90% of the time the answer I'm looking for has been answered a few times already which explains the low post numbers even though I'm on here every other day.  From what I've seen, people on here are willing to give you the benefit of the doubt and help out where they can as long as you're open to constructive criticism.  I'll do my best not to be "that guy".

No need to feel uncomfortable ..................... we were ALL "THAT GUY" once. You are not born knowing how to weld, do lathework, paint the Cistine Chapel roof .................. it comes with time, EXPERIENCE, and the will to learn. I've been at this bike building game for over 55 years, I've built many hundreds of bikes for myself and friends - I'm still learning.

Certainly, some are born with a natural aptitude for a particular task - but again, there's no substitute for learning in the real World.

How would an Eskimo, or a Zulu warrior in his natural environment know he MIGHT be good at designing underground airships ? You have to be in the right environment - and that includes gaining the everyday knowledge that some bike builders take for granted.

I can weld - it's not pretty and I'm never certain how good it is ... so I call in someone who DOES have the right skills. Does that make me less of a bike builder ? Certainly I am less of a manufacturer of parts - but then as previously stated - NOBODY makes a complete bike from scratch - Honda, Triumph et al excluded - but then THEY don't make all their own parts either !!!

Like I said, it's degress of skill, ASK the question that you don't know the answer to - and the knowledge you seek young Grasshopper will come with time.
"if at first you don't succeed, you've already been a failure once"

" we're not going back to the sixties - we never left "

"yep, nostalgia ain't what it used to be"

"I used to be indecisive - now I'm not so sure"

Offline Joon-yah

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Re: NEW MEMBERS - Read this - I'm sorry, but c'mon people.
« Reply #126 on: May 29, 2013, 13:15:27 »
My theory is, you only fail once you give up. If you have the desire to succeed you will,but its not easy.
Cm400/cb450 http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=45376.0                                                  SR500 http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=43591.0                                                     http://retromoto1.com/

Offline bubonicplay

  • Posts: 290
Re: NEW MEMBERS - Read this - I'm sorry, but c'mon people.
« Reply #127 on: Aug 23, 2013, 06:34:10 »
read...

Offline mAd mOrdigan

  • Posts: 235
    • my build thread
Re: NEW MEMBERS - Read this - I'm sorry, but c'mon people.
« Reply #128 on: Sep 22, 2013, 01:22:19 »
read and noted

Offline CP92

  • Posts: 1
  • Determined not to fuck this up.
Re: NEW MEMBERS - Read this - I'm sorry, but c'mon people.
« Reply #129 on: Oct 23, 2013, 19:01:33 »
First post on the site!

I'll make sure to remember what's been said on this thread when I start prying apart the grubby crank cases on my recently acquired CB175..

To the regular posters and advice givers, thanks in advance. You guys have already become tutors and the bits and pieces I've picked up are only the start I'm sure.

I'm hoping to do a full nut and bolt on the old girl after uni finishes next summer (minimal and cream carpet in the uni digs make for less than ideal evening activity circumstances) but for now I'm just trying to make the best out of a bad situation and get up and running before winter.

(Yes I rebuilt the front brake on my bedroom floor, but I am no hipster with a 2 week obsession with bikes, nor one of those lube a cable with olive oil and woo a bike back to life with artistic flare types) I know my way around a lathe and mill cheers lol!

A battered Haynes manual and youtube have done me well so far but after less than a week perusing the site I already feel much better about the undertaking.

It's people like you guys that give guys like me the inspiration to turn a 400 shitheap into something I can be proud to wheel out of the garage. Not sure if that's a good or bad thing yet as I've not really started, only time will tell..

Anyway, Hat's off to you lot and thanks again for the wealth of free information and guidence, the world works a lot better when people stop measuring dicks and do what they can to help someone who needs it.

 8)
Carbs used to scare me. Now they just frustrate me.