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Author Topic: CB360 project  (Read 25011 times)

Offline ridesolo

  • Posts: 1085
  • "Illegitimi non carborundum"
Re: CB360 project
« Reply #10 on: Dec 30, 2012, 13:50:37 »
Thanks for the offer ridesolo. If I can't find a decent one I just may take you up on that offer. I wonder how much benefit you'd get removing that extra rotational weight from the crank?

Yeah, that's why I originally wasn't going to take the trouble to remove mine, I figured there wouldn't be that much gain for the effort.
“Fight on and fly on to the last drop of blood and the last drop of fuel, to the last beat of the heart.”
— Baron Manfred von Richthofen

Please check out:  http://www.VetTix.org

These are on a low simmer out in the shop:
'75 Honda CL360: http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=56547.0
'70 Rupp Roadster: http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=67459.0

Offline thrillseeker

  • Posts: 326
CB360 project
« Reply #11 on: Dec 30, 2012, 14:02:26 »
Actually, i was leaning the other direction. Weight off any rotational mass gains you something like 4 times (dont quote my numbers) the benefit than weight taken from anywhere else. So, the 20 minutes it takes to remove the cover and pull the rotor may just be worth it. Im sure someone on here could chime in with any experience they have on the subject.
Don't take life too seriously, you'll never get out alive.

Offline thrillseeker

  • Posts: 326
Re: CB360 project
« Reply #12 on: Jan 02, 2013, 17:28:51 »
since my alternator cover and chain cover are off I decided to clean them up a bit. I started hand sanding the alternator cover but decided that was going to take way too much elbow greese to get right. I had to find a better solution. after looking around I discovered dremel has what they call finishing abrasive buffs. I got a couple sets of them and went to town. holy crap they work well! they easily got rid of any deep corrosion and light scratches made by the sand paper I had used previously. after using 180, 280, and 320 grit, I turned to my polishing wheel on my bench grinder to finish up. all I can say is wow. that was 10 times easier than trying to do it by hand! and it turned out really nice. I'll post up pics when I have time tonight. I forgot to take a before shot but I can take a picture of the other cover for reference.
Don't take life too seriously, you'll never get out alive.

Offline thrillseeker

  • Posts: 326
Don't take life too seriously, you'll never get out alive.

Offline Sonreir

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  • Posts: 10341
  • Oregon
Re: CB360 project
« Reply #14 on: Feb 08, 2013, 21:02:14 »
Almost all condensers are are interchangeable.  They're just a large capacitor.
Sparck Moto - http://www.sparckmoto.com

Audaces fortuna iuvat.

1977 Honda CJ360 - Café SOS - Stage One™, Café SOS - Stage Two™
1976 Puch Maxi - APuchalypse Now
Suzi T500 Cobra Resto

Custom Gauge Graphics
Custom Wiring Harnesses

DTT Red, White, and/or Black 360 Club - Better than those Blue guys

Offline thrillseeker

  • Posts: 326
CB360 project
« Reply #15 on: Feb 08, 2013, 21:04:45 »
Thanks sonreir
Don't take life too seriously, you'll never get out alive.

Offline thrillseeker

  • Posts: 326
Re: CB360 project
« Reply #16 on: Feb 09, 2013, 12:28:13 »
After measuring for new cables to work with the clipons, I came up with 3.25" shorter than stock for the throttle cables and 8" shorter for the clutch. Does that sound right? It seems like they would all be around the same amount of change but I'm not sure so I want to check with you guys. The clutch measurement is the one that scares me. But I measured everything twice and moved the bars left and right to accommodate for movement. Thoughts?
Don't take life too seriously, you'll never get out alive.

Offline thrillseeker

  • Posts: 326
Re: CB360 project
« Reply #17 on: Feb 09, 2013, 14:16:32 »
I got new coils, wires, and caps on from mikesxs.com (dont leave out the first "s" or you'll get a very different site lol).

They dont mount right up so I got a piece of angle aluminum and used the stock mounting brackets as a template to fab up a little bracket to make them fit. The only issue was figuring out which wires to connect to the stock wiring because they're different colors. A few minutes of looking at the wiring diagram helped. I was able to set the timing yesterday so I guess that means I wired them up correctly. The points were sparking though so I'm assuming that means the condenser isn't working correctly. That's why I asked about the cb350 condenser. The one I have was one I replaced the old one with a month ago but it came in a box of spare parts with the bike so I'm just assuming its bad as well.

Once I get my cables done I should be able to put fluids in and start her up.





« Last Edit: Feb 09, 2013, 14:30:11 by thrillseeker »
Don't take life too seriously, you'll never get out alive.

Offline thrillseeker

  • Posts: 326
CB360 project
« Reply #18 on: Mar 12, 2013, 23:09:24 »
Bike is running strong now with new points, condenser, coils, wires, caps, and plugs. Lesson learned: inspect points closely. They were not obviously corroded on the outside but pitted in the center.
Don't take life too seriously, you'll never get out alive.

Offline thrillseeker

  • Posts: 326
CB360 project
« Reply #19 on: Dec 22, 2013, 17:15:45 »
Working on the bike again since winter is here. Decided to rebuild the air filters since replacements cost $50 each from hondacb360.com and the cv carbs dont like pods. Was able to rebuild them for about $3 in parts. Here are some photos of the process i took.

Cut out the existing filter element:


Pull apart the filter body:


Scrape out the remaining gunk. A liberal heat gun is your best friend:


Get the leftover gunk out. I used a wire wheel on a bench grinder:


Use some silicone to put the plates, mesh, and boot back together:


Clamp and let dry overnight:


Cut some cotton padding in a strip to use as a filter element. I got this stuff from a local craft store. Think its used inside blankets or something. Also, no need to glue the ends down. The filter housing holds it down nice.


Thats it. All done. Now when i need to replace my filter i can just cut another strip of the cotton material i got and swap it out. Easy. Also, no need to glue the filter element down. the housing holds the ends down nice and snug once its on.
« Last Edit: Jan 02, 2014, 23:29:00 by thrillseeker »
Don't take life too seriously, you'll never get out alive.