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Author Topic: 1983 XV500 Cafe Racer  (Read 55935 times)

Offline Karlloss

  • Posts: 223
Re: 1983 XV500 Cafe Racer
« Reply #200 on: Aug 11, 2017, 15:10:46 »
Yeah, I see that now. I was replying to the first page info, and I see now that there are four pages :)

Nice looking build! I wish I had the machines you do! So jealous!

Charles.
Thanks for the support. Been a long road so far, I'm hoping to get it finished in the next 6 months.


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Offline JadusMotorcycleParts

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Re: 1983 XV500 Cafe Racer
« Reply #201 on: Aug 18, 2017, 13:16:19 »
Love that damper rod set up.  One of the cleanest/best integrated set ups I have seen!

Offline Karlloss

  • Posts: 223
Re: 1983 XV500 Cafe Racer
« Reply #202 on: Aug 26, 2017, 17:04:42 »
Love that damper rod set up.  One of the cleanest/best integrated set ups I have seen!

Thanks.

It took a bit of working out, I'm quite pleased with it. I didn't want something that stuck out in front too much, I wanted to keep it as tight as I could.


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Offline Karlloss

  • Posts: 223
Re: 1983 XV500 Cafe Racer
« Reply #203 on: Sep 23, 2017, 12:40:21 »
Things have been slow lately, managed to get some bits done today and started to pull the dents out of the tank.









Not the perfect job, but a lot better than it was.


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Offline Karlloss

  • Posts: 223
Re: 1983 XV500 Cafe Racer
« Reply #204 on: Oct 10, 2017, 04:12:20 »
I needed to cope some tube to make support struts. Not having a 22mm hole saw, plus in my experience hole saws donít cut very neat.

Luckily my milling machine has a tilting head, although it is not that rigid when tilted, but it did the job.








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Offline MichaelTR1

  • Posts: 20
Re: 1983 XV500 Cafe Racer
« Reply #205 on: Oct 30, 2017, 09:40:43 »
Great build! Love that you can do all the construction work yourself and have the right equipment!

Offline Karlloss

  • Posts: 223
Re: 1983 XV500 Cafe Racer
« Reply #206 on: Nov 01, 2017, 17:11:49 »
Great build! Love that you can do all the construction work yourself and have the right equipment!

Thanks. All the gear (well some gear) and no idea!!


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Offline Karlloss

  • Posts: 223
Re: 1983 XV500 Cafe Racer
« Reply #207 on: May 06, 2018, 14:42:28 »
Managed to find some time today in between working and doing other work related things.

Iíve machines up the lock stops. For such a simple and basic item, itís surprising how long it takes to make them.




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Offline Karlloss

  • Posts: 223
Re: 1983 XV500 Cafe Racer
« Reply #208 on: Oct 13, 2018, 15:22:29 »
After a long break due to work and life getting in the way, Iím now able to get some time in on the project.

Iíve had to remanufacture the rear shock mounts as it was fouling the rear wheel on full compression. Whilst it looks the same, itís actually been modified a lot, the lower mount on the swingarm was cut off and a new piece welded in which is 20mm higher and 15 mm closer to the swingarm pivot for the lower shock pivot. The upper frame brackets have been trimmed to accommodate this.

Although not in the pictures, Iíve also bought a new spring, which is 130 n/mm, a vast improvement on the existing one which is 95n/mm.










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Offline jpmobius

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Re: 1983 XV500 Cafe Racer
« Reply #209 on: Oct 13, 2018, 17:53:35 »
A lot of nice work so far.  Regarding your new rear suspension setup, you may want to reconsider.  Your original setup created a reducing rate of spring and damping, but I expect not exceptionally severe.  The new setup will be very noticeable.  Even if you only ride the bike casually, I expect you will still find the back end behaving quite poorly.  If you increase the spring pressure to the point that bottoming out is not a problem, the normal ride will be very harsh.  In general, (in this case) the angle between the link between the lower shock mount and swing arm pivot and the shock body should be acute at rest and come up to 90o when at max compression.  That way the spring force increases to maximum as the suspension is compressed to the end of its travel.  Your original scheme was nearly the opposite of this, but now is much worse.  It also looks like the spring will be very close to contacting the frame when at full compression, but hard to tell just by looking at the pics.  Not saying the bike will be unrideable by any means, but certainly disappointing considering all the work involved.  The original lower pivot had much better geometry (again, just from looking at the pics), though without being able to lean the shock forward at the top would need to be lower to get good geometry.  I don't have a simple solution.  At least not one that does not involve pretty much starting again.  For such a simple mechanism mechanically, there is rather a bit to figure out if you want it to work well, especially if you have to design around an existing shock.  You simply cannot overcome poor geometry no matter what you have for a shock, and I would bet it also impossible to construct a progressive spring to neutralize the issue given the physical space available.  As a guideline, start with calculating the length of the link you need to get the wheel travel you want with the shock travel you have.  Then, you can see where that link can be in relation to the swing arm pivot and still fit on the bike incorporating the above noted angle to the shock arriving at 90o at full compression.  This can easily be impossible depending on the space in front of the tire, and the available real estate above to fit the other end of the shock.  In your case, it looks like the tire is too close to the swing arm pivot to mount the shock low enough to achieve the angle you need, and if you raise it like you have, the frame prevents you from leaning the shock forward to achieve the needed geometry.  One solution is to  move the lower shock pivot much higher and further back (like the stock location) so you can escape the frame conflict and lean the shock forward, but this changes substantially the shock travel and spring rate.  Alternatively, you move the lower mount down in front of the tire and move the wheel back to get the clearance you need.  Which of course changes the wheelbase etc. and gives you even more things to consider.
Anyway, some things to think about.  It takes a lot of dedication and perseverance to do such a project, and especially so to scrap part of it to do over, like you have already done.  Respect!
« Last Edit: Oct 13, 2018, 18:02:09 by jpmobius »
Mobius


On a long enough timeline, the survival rate for everyone drops to zero.

1973 RD350 Yamaha build  http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=66498.0