collapse

www.cognitomoto.com

www.dimecitycycles.com

https://www.townmoto.com/collections/vanson-leathers


www.restocycle.com

www.CITYLIMITMOTO.com

www.jadusmotorcycleparts.com

www.bisonmotorsports.com

www.speedmotoco.com

www.lostapostlejewelry.com

www.sparckmoto.com

www.pistonsociety.com

www.steeltowngarage.com


Author Topic: Jared's 1982 CM450C Cafe Project  (Read 23661 times)

Offline jaredc7

  • Posts: 60
  • Get busy living.
Re: Jared's 1982 CM450C Cafe Project
« Reply #20 on: Feb 06, 2014, 16:59:04 »
In regards to your fork/axle swap comments don't worry so much out the stem and axle diameters.  Measure out the bearing dimensions and then model up your own axle and stem.  I don't think it would take much for you to figure out a bearing size that is easily available on your rims and then machine a corresponding axle to fit the forks and wheel.  As for the stem, it's a actually pretty common to swap stems on the lower triple to get right combination of length and bearing size.  You might be limited on your budget to the VFR wheels, but bearing conversions aren't to expensive and turning a new stem or axle shouldn't be to bad either.  Also check out misumi-usa.com before you commit to a machinist on the axles, they have pretty competitive pricing for custom shafts with configurable machining options. 

On your VFR rear rim, don't be surprised if you have to make any spacers to push the wheel to the right to clear the swingarm as well.  IIRC correctly they are so much wider/offset differently than the NT650 you will need to add an 8mm spacer or so, surf around the build threads on customfighters.com, they've got tons of builds doing the SSSA conversions on sportbikes that you can pull applicable information from.

Keep up the good work and post lots of pics for those of us who enjoy the unusual/unconventional!

Thanks for the feedback CXMAN, much appreciated. I eventually solved the front forks / front axle issue by just going with forks from a 2006 CBR600RR and then using the exact front wheel that goes with that bike. You can't really see the fron wheel anyways since there are two brake rotors, and it doesn't look all that dissimilar from the '94-'97 VFR750 5-spoke wheel that I have. I picked up the sterring stem bearing conversion from AllBallsRacing, so I'm all set! Just need to fine tune the fork placement, triple trees, and spring rates. I also picked up all new seals for the forks just in case.

I did quite a bit of research into the VFR wheel before purchase, and actually found that the rear spindle is exactly the same part between the Hawk and VFR. Since I wasn't constrained to the Hawk spindle (just the hawk SSA), I bought the VFR750 rear spindle with the VFR750 rear wheel. I fit it up recently, and the wheel definitely clears, but I'll have to wait to get the tire on before I'll know if I need spacers. Very good input, and something I'll be paying attention to now.

Stay tuned for more pictures, I'm always working on something!   :D :D
Jared

1982 Honda CM450 C

Offline DoTheTodd

  • Posts: 122
Re: Jared's 1982 CM450C Cafe Project
« Reply #21 on: Feb 06, 2014, 18:19:09 »
I like the single side swing arm.  I'm interested to see how it looks.
See my build thread here:

1982 CM450e City Commuter Cafe
http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=48689.0

Offline jaredc7

  • Posts: 60
  • Get busy living.
Re: Jared's 1982 CM450C Cafe Project
« Reply #22 on: Feb 24, 2014, 17:11:09 »
HEY! I have a little progress to report on.... Yay!

So I got all the numbers I needed from the Honda Hawk forum for the Hawk's stock suspension geometry. Then I  took some of my own measurements, crunched a bunch of numbers, and came up with this draft for my suspension geometry (see picture below). The main change here is that on the Hawk, the shock top mount is 25mm in front of the SSA pivot. For my bike, the shock top mount is 50mm behind the SSA pivot, for a total change of 75mm. The reason for the 50mm is because the shock's top mount is planned to be mounted on the outside, or rear of, the frame's vertical member.

In an effort to minimize this change as much as possible, I found the shortest shock (eye-to-eye length). This is the CB900f (aka Honda 919). It is 27mm shorter than the Hawk shock, and about the same spring stiffness (100lb/in less stiff, since my bike will be lighter). Still though, with the shorter shock, I still have a significantly different suspension geometry. When I mocked up the bike with the frame and swing arm (see picture), it did not look as drastic as the calculations would suggest. I will definitely have to verify all the calcs with the real world!!

I'm going to take this to my structural steel engineer friend and run some force calculations to further the desing of the shock top mount. Right now, I am assuming rider (170lbs) + sprung mass (400lbs) + driving dynamics + shock loading = 2,000lb of force. Some of that will be taken by the shock/damper, so I'm going to do some more research to find out how much will actually be transferred to the frame.

Thanks for looking and let me know what you think!
Jared

1982 Honda CM450 C

Offline cobraace2

  • Posts: 284
Re: Jared's 1982 CM450C Cafe Project
« Reply #23 on: Feb 25, 2014, 11:05:54 »
Wow I was working on a project like this  about 3 years ago  :D the guy did not like how it was going and got a cb350 instead   ;D Its still here some place if you want I will take some pictures for you.

Offline jaredc7

  • Posts: 60
  • Get busy living.
Re: Jared's 1982 CM450C Cafe Project
« Reply #24 on: Feb 25, 2014, 14:35:22 »
Wow I was working on a project like this  about 3 years ago  :D the guy did not like how it was going and got a cb350 instead   ;D Its still here some place if you want I will take some pictures for you.

That would be great. I'm interested to see how everything was fit together. How far along is the project?
Jared

1982 Honda CM450 C

Offline cobraace2

  • Posts: 284
Re: Jared's 1982 CM450C Cafe Project
« Reply #25 on: Feb 25, 2014, 16:24:11 »
it was a runner he beat on for a month and then said it still looked ugly  ;D and wanted to change the frame again  :o I told him what he owed me and that was that ::)

Offline cobraace2

  • Posts: 284
Re: Jared's 1982 CM450C Cafe Project
« Reply #26 on: Feb 25, 2014, 23:48:25 »
Here are some pictures  the swinger is sting 1/2 " to the right and the sprocket goes on the back side of carrier no offset sprocket


 




Offline jaredc7

  • Posts: 60
  • Get busy living.
Re: Jared's 1982 CM450C Cafe Project
« Reply #27 on: Mar 04, 2014, 21:20:58 »
Thanks for the pictures CobraAce, looks sweet.

I can't tell very well from the third picture how the swinger was incorporated into the frame... Do you know anything about that? Regardless of the swing-arm pivot shaft diameters (Hawk is 15mm and CM450 is 14mm), the pivot of the swing arm was in a spacial conflict with the engine/transmission case...
Jared

1982 Honda CM450 C

Offline rattpunk

  • Posts: 229
Re: Jared's 1982 CM450C Cafe Project
« Reply #28 on: Apr 16, 2014, 01:32:28 »
It's been a while since I've dropped by this place, but glad I did. Shit you guys do is fucking cool and always such an inspiration.  How's this going anyway?


Ended up here, looking into fork replacement for my 82 cm450c, btw.
"A problem well stated is a problem half solved." - Charles Kettering

Mongrel cm450

Offline cobraace2

  • Posts: 284
Re: Jared's 1982 CM450C Cafe Project
« Reply #29 on: Apr 16, 2014, 12:38:35 »
jaredc used 650 swinger bolt hog out frame and cut and shim must be at least  1/2 inch to the right side move sprocket to inside and check for alignment yes it clears trans .  after mounted lift bike let swinger fall till ride hight looks good  weld top mount  8) or you could get all technical and and get a cheap 13$ starrett  angle meter set your head angle like you wanted.