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Author Topic: The Chinese Tracker/Scrambler thing...  (Read 16544 times)

Offline dualero

  • Posts: 215
Re: The Chinese Tracker/Scrambler thing...
« Reply #60 on: Mar 17, 2016, 14:54:41 »
All right. I'm back. University got in the way again. Another thing that had slowed the project down was that I was unable to find any tubing appropriate enough to build the new subframe.

I have been waiting for months  for the tubing to appear at the stores, but as seen as the size I'm looking for is not too well sold, they aren't being produced by the manufacturers. The country is undertaken by its own economic problems and there is scarce in almost anything you may want to buy (too much government control)

Anyway, I decided I'm going to use galvanized 1/2" pipe to build the subframe. It has a size relatively close to the stock subframe tube diameter (21mm stock, 19mm galvanized 1/2"), a good wall thickness and is awfuly-smoky-weldable. But doable.

Correct me If there is something wrong with using this tubing for frame building other than welding issues that I am already aware of. I'll say goodbye until tomorrow when I finish my exams.

More updates coming as I'm sourcing the pipe and be having it delivered to my house tomorrow. 

Saludos Amigos!

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Offline slikwilli420

  • Posts: 193
Re: The Chinese Tracker/Scrambler thing...
« Reply #61 on: Mar 17, 2016, 17:47:30 »
Galvanized tubing like you are talking about is probably the least correct thing to use that is still steel. The tubing is generally low quality and not up to structural use. You are probably sourcing galvanized tubing used for electrical purposes. Aside from the fact that that smoke coming off of the hot tubing is extremely poisonous, its a pretty bad idea.

Offline dualero

  • Posts: 215
Re: The Chinese Tracker/Scrambler thing...
« Reply #62 on: Mar 18, 2016, 09:11:40 »
Sadly for me, that's the only "appropriate" tubing in size and wall thickness (in steel) that I'm able to source for sure here in Venezuela.

I'm stranded at this point on the project because of this, I'm still tempted to go with the galvanized route anyway as is the only option I have, that's not leaving the subframe as it is now.

Another important fact is that the subframe that is built to the frame was made by me as a first attempt at modding the bike. Back then I was welding a lot worse than now and my overkill grinding techniques made the subframe a little sketchy in places (even fatigue cracks appeared at the inner back portion of the frame loop)

Slikwilli420, I appreciate your concern and recommendations, don't feel ignored. I'm just desperate to go on with the bike, but it's being really hard to find the right materials for the job. Thanks for your input.

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Offline dualero

  • Posts: 215
Re: The Chinese Tracker/Scrambler thing...
« Reply #63 on: Mar 18, 2016, 09:13:25 »
Galvanized tubing like you are talking about is probably the least correct thing to use that is still steel. The tubing is generally low quality and not up to structural use. You are probably sourcing galvanized tubing used for electrical purposes. Aside from the fact that that smoke coming off of the hot tubing is extremely poisonous, its a pretty bad idea.
About using conduit tubing, don't you think that they are too thin (wall wise) for use on frame building? The conduit I'm able to source is really thin, so I'll feel more comfortable using galvanized tubing

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« Last Edit: Mar 18, 2016, 09:14:57 by dualero »

Offline DohcBikes

  • Posts: 2376
  • Fuck You.
Re: The Chinese Tracker/Scrambler thing...
« Reply #64 on: Mar 18, 2016, 12:05:49 »
conduit IS galvanized. He's telling you NOT to use it!!!!!!!!! And why in the hell would you want to use galvanized, just get mild steel. I see now you are in venezuala. use whatever you can get.
burning bridges sometimes light the most productive paths

Offline dualero

  • Posts: 215
Re: The Chinese Tracker/Scrambler thing...
« Reply #65 on: Mar 18, 2016, 20:44:56 »


I see now you are in venezuala. use whatever you can get.

^^THIS. At least someone is a bit informed about the world.



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Offline Erskine

  • Posts: 2163
Re: The Chinese Tracker/Scrambler thing...
« Reply #66 on: Mar 18, 2016, 20:53:23 »
I used electrical galv tubing for the header on my chinese ohv, it was the only stuff i could source easily with the right bend and ID.
I ground of the galv where I needed to weld. The rest of it burn off with use. Luckily I'm not in the habit of riding along with my face next to the exhaust pipe so I think I was ok.

Offline Andres Deleon

  • Posts: 4
Re: The Chinese Tracker/Scrambler thing...
« Reply #67 on: Jun 04, 2016, 02:13:17 »
Oiga Guillermo,

I found this site and your thread while looking for pictures of a Suzuki GN 125 swing arm. I live in Mťxico in the YucatŠn Peninsula. I read your whole thread and I like what youíve done and what youíre trying to do. I want to build a couple of small displacement cafe racers for my son and me. I have a GN 125 and thought about modifying it, but as youíve learned the frame isnít appropriately shaped to make a good cafe bike or scrambler. (I saw your frame is similar to the GN 125.) It makes an awesome little bobber though. And unfortunately there arenít a lot of old 70ís Honda CBs laying around in Mexico, with beautiful straight simple frames, unlike in the U.S.A. The modern Japanese and Chinese bikes available here have really ugly frames, many made of pressed steel. Most bikes here are underbones with the Honda clone 50/70/90/110 motor. My son wants a Yamaha YZF-R15. But they are too expensive. I canīt afford it. They cost over $60,000 pesos. Thatís almost $3,500 Dollars.
So what options do I have left? Well, Iíve reconsidered using the Suzuki. Itīs got proven Japanese tech and precision. Itís been around since 1982. Itīs got the strongest motor in its class. (Potencia - 12.5 HP/9000 rpm) and one of the lightest frames (Peso seco - 107 kg) And the price new is around $25,000 pesos. A very clean recent model used one will sell for around 15,000-17,000 pesos (less than $1,000 dollars). One like mine, (12 years old), could be had for less than $500 dollars.

So if I use the Suzuki Iíll have a lot of modifying to do to the sub frame as you did. I had thought of many of the same mods you tried on your bike. Iím glad I found your thread because it will keep me from making some of the same mistakes you did. Like changing your forks for longer ones only to have to lower them later. Or lengthening you swing arm just to replace it later. Or cutting and bending your sub frame and later try to fab a new one.

I have a question for you. Itís why I registered so I could post it. Why did you change your mind after lengthening you swing arm and replace it with an original? I hope you respond, because Iīm considering the same mod myself and if you changed your mind because it didnít function well, Iíd appreciate knowing why. Was it a design/engineering flaw? Or did it ride well/poor? Or did you simply change it for ascetic reasons.

Iím considering removing the sub frame completely and building a new one with a mono shock and slightly longer swing arm. Since my boy wants a sport bike, I thought I could mod the Suzuki into some sort of naked street fighter concept. Or a cafť racer with a mono shock so it will look more modern for his 17 year old tastes.
Any help you could give would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Andres

Offline Andres Deleon

  • Posts: 4
Re: The Chinese Tracker/Scrambler thing...
« Reply #68 on: Jun 04, 2016, 03:51:31 »

Offline Andres Deleon

  • Posts: 4
Re: The Chinese Tracker/Scrambler thing...
« Reply #69 on: Jun 04, 2016, 03:59:25 »

Or like this with a larger more aggresive rear tire.


The GN125 makes a nice little bobber.


If I modify one for my son, I might as well make one for me too. I really like the look of the old Cafe Racers. I know this picture isn't very good buy I just photoshoped it real quick to make an example as a cafe racer. It needs a bigger tank, smaller seat, ect.