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Author Topic: 1966 Triumph Bonneville restoration  (Read 19913 times)

Offline 3DogNate

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Re: 1966 Triumph Bonneville restoration
« Reply #50 on: Jul 04, 2016, 15:21:10 »
F'n -A dude looks awesome! My tank and fenders are going off for paint this week. I hope my bike ends up looking as good as yours....

Be sure to video the first start up... if you'd checked all the boxes it should fire right up. That's a great feeling when a build starts first couple of kicks.

Did you stick with stock carbs? Mine are pretty nasty and the slides don't look especially great... I'm likely to just go with a new set of Amal Premier carbs and be done.

Offline grandpaul

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Re: 1966 Triumph Bonneville restoration
« Reply #51 on: Jul 04, 2016, 16:34:36 »
Did you stick with stock carbs? Mine are pretty nasty and the slides don't look especially great... I'm likely to just go with a new set of Amal Premier carbs and be done.
I'm always in the market for reasonably priced donor/core Amals, when the time comes.
It ain't braggin' if ya done it.

Offline 3DogNate

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Re: 1966 Triumph Bonneville restoration
« Reply #52 on: Jul 04, 2016, 19:27:15 »
I'm always in the market for reasonably priced donor/core Amals, when the time comes.

I probably take them apart in the next couple of weeks and give them an ultrasonic cleaning and make a real assessment of them more than the initial glance I gave em a few months back.

Offline swan

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  • Kickstart, shift on right, drum brakes and spokes
    • 1962 BSA Gold Star barn find restoration
Re: 1966 Triumph Bonneville restoration
« Reply #53 on: Jul 05, 2016, 11:01:44 »
Thanks guys, after messing around with used Amal carbs with unknown histories on several bike projects, I simply bite the bullet and buy new ones, they are much better than they were made originally.

She’s alive!!!!



Fired her up for the first time two nights ago and rode her for the first time yesterday. Wow, all that time, hard work, and money was worth it. She now starts on first or second kick, idles well and really pulls hard. What a joy to ride and I rode her to work this beautiful morning.


She fought me hard on the final details. After much frustration with the battery carrier and side cover, Skip and I realized it was too low and had been modified. I folded the tops of the carrier back to how it was originally, and everything fit the way it was designed. Skip loves wiring and went over my loom a few times, soldering, crimping and testing all the connections and all the electrical works as it should. Thanks man.  The 2 into one cable system is frustrating to say the least and so is the cable bend in to the top  of the carbs. The throttle cable routing took quite awhile to get right, so as not to raise the idle. There is not a lot of room under the tank. At times like this, I am glad I bought new Amal carbs, fuel line, and petcocks. They all work well. The motor, primary and gearbox are drip free (so far) but the left fork is weeping oil at the bottom.  The clutch cable (new) is sticking and needs to be lubed.

First ride.

 Skip (right) and I setting the air mixture on the carbs.


I am going to put on more break-in miles, fettle, go over all the nuts and bolts, recheck the tappet clearances, timing the ignition again, retorque the cylinder head, change the oil, etc.  I have been riding clip-on handlebars for 15 years straight and it is a very strange sensation to be sitting upright on a motorcycle. I am still getting used to the upright European bars and have not quite found where I want the bars and control levers. The blade levers may not last too long on my bike and I may switch to the solid cast Amal type.

 Anyways, thanks all for the encouragement and support during this build, it really helps. This motorcycle has special and personal meaning to me so I am keeping it for life. Time to put on some more miles….

1966 Triton cafe, 1962 BSA Gold Star DBD34, and 1966 T120 Triumph Bonneville.
BSA Gold Star barn find restoration
1975 CB400F Cafe Racer build
1966 Triumph Bonnevile restoration

Offline Maritime

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Re: 1966 Triumph Bonneville restoration
« Reply #54 on: Jul 05, 2016, 11:07:12 »
Ride, ride, ride, then ride some more. She's a keeper for sure.
The GL Rebirth: http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=68337.0
CX500 Low budget Bobber : http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=43617.0
"Beer makes you feel the way you ought to feel without beer" -Henry Lawson
"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." - Thomas Jefferson

Offline datadavid

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Re: 1966 Triumph Bonneville restoration
« Reply #55 on: Jul 05, 2016, 11:17:36 »
Perfect, just perfect 👌

Offline grandpaul

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Re: 1966 Triumph Bonneville restoration
« Reply #56 on: Jul 05, 2016, 12:17:38 »
"That'll do till something else comes along"

Actually, it'll do rather well!
It ain't braggin' if ya done it.

Offline goldy

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Re: 1966 Triumph Bonneville restoration
« Reply #57 on: Jul 05, 2016, 18:08:13 »
The more you ride it, the better it'll get. Excellent work..paid off for sure, the bike is stunning!
1948 Norton ES2
1955 AJS 20B
1956 Triumph TRW
1968 Triumph T100 special
1969 Norton Commando
1975 XS650 Yamaha

Offline yorkie350

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Re: 1966 Triumph Bonneville restoration
« Reply #58 on: Jul 06, 2016, 06:08:51 »
Beautiful bike mate great thread. When you end up with a keeper you know you hit the jackpot , enjoy the miles and the attention you gonna get with the old trumper ,look forward to ya next project.
Life's too short to go slow at anything !  unless your re-building ya ride !!

 cb350f '72 café racer 
 cb550f '78 Hailwood race rep

Offline swan

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Re: 1966 Triumph Bonneville restoration
« Reply #59 on: Jul 07, 2016, 10:50:45 »
Awww, thanks guys...
I hit my first 50 miles last night with no issues other than a blown fuse. I had a 15 amp fuse when the books say 30 amp fuse. I plan to change the oil, rinse the oil tank, check the tappet clearances, retorque bolts, etc tomorrow. She is running really well, the gearbox 'snicks' cleanly up and down through all the gears, and is an absolute pleasure to ride. I have a couple days off with great weather this weekend so I will be out as much as possible. Here are a couple of before and after shots:






« Last Edit: Jul 07, 2016, 10:56:23 by swan »
1966 Triton cafe, 1962 BSA Gold Star DBD34, and 1966 T120 Triumph Bonneville.
BSA Gold Star barn find restoration
1975 CB400F Cafe Racer build
1966 Triumph Bonnevile restoration