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Author Topic: 1982 CB750F Super Sport - (no longer a Brat Project)  (Read 12587 times)

Offline 88SS

  • Posts: 74
Re: 1982 CB750F Super Sport - (no longer a Brat Project)
« Reply #130 on: Jun 06, 2017, 18:29:28 »
Can't believe someone read this post and commented on it again. But, since you did, let me tell you that I learned a lot from my experience and ultimately getting into the motor helped me to correct some underlying issues that ultimately would have shortened the life of this bike. One of the things I don't think I ever mentioned was the cam tensioner guides were nearly toast, all cracked and rock hard. That is another example of an issue avoided as a result of getting into the motor.

The final result of the bike was all good. Everything I did ultimately made it better, not worse as some would have you believe or at least tried to predict. I kept it all this time, and only very recently sold it to someone in California. So it has a new home now.

ben

Strangely enough I was searching threads for shimming valves.

Sounds like you've been through it, but there's no way I'm selling mine. It's already hard to find one stock


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Offline hillsy

  • Posts: 4094
Re: 1982 CB750F Super Sport - (no longer a Brat Project)
« Reply #131 on: Jun 06, 2017, 19:59:29 »
Strangely enough I was searching threads for shimming valves.

Sounds like you've been through it, but there's no way I'm selling mine. It's already hard to find one stock



If there's one bit of advice I can give you about taking out cams (especially in a motor where they've probably never been taken out) - get a suitable drift and whack the heads of the cam cap bolts before you even think about putting a socket or wrench on them. They have been through a million heat cycles and you can bet your bottom dollar you will snap at least one of them trying to remove them without some impact to loosen the threads. The bolt heads have rims on them, so your drift wont move and smash anything as long as you are not totally ham-fisted.

Offline Popeye SXM

  • Posts: 49
  • Also used for MX
Re: 1982 CB750F Super Sport - (no longer a Brat Project)
« Reply #132 on: Jun 06, 2017, 21:18:54 »
Hi armourbl
I just found your post. Wow some people are real as*#7 holes!!! It is your bike do as you please. Your bike is a mass produced Japaneses bike (a very good one) I used to own one. It is not historically important. If you want to cut it up go for it. Old aluminum engines can be difficult to work on, as you are finding out. Stick at it. I think you are doing great, the bike is worth the effort.

Offline 88SS

  • Posts: 74
Re: 1982 CB750F Super Sport - (no longer a Brat Project)
« Reply #133 on: Jun 06, 2017, 21:58:31 »

If there's one bit of advice I can give you about taking out cams (especially in a motor where they've probably never been taken out) - get a suitable drift and whack the heads of the cam cap bolts before you even think about putting a socket or wrench on them. They have been through a million heat cycles and you can bet your bottom dollar you will snap at least one of them trying to remove them without some impact to loosen the threads. The bolt heads have rims on them, so your drift wont move and smash anything as long as you are not totally ham-fisted.

I don't have to remove the cams to shim the valves. I don't anticipate having to may other issues. Timing is good. The only other thing that may need attention would be the tensioner, and I'm hoping it won't. Just want a smooth trip down to Alabama in October


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Offline hillsy

  • Posts: 4094
Re: 1982 CB750F Super Sport - (no longer a Brat Project)
« Reply #134 on: Jun 07, 2017, 02:42:51 »
I don't have to remove the cams to shim the valves. I don't anticipate having to may other issues. Timing is good. The only other thing that may need attention would be the tensioner, and I'm hoping it won't. Just want a smooth trip down to Alabama in October



Realise that about the shims - I was more lamenting on the OP snapping off a cam cap bolt or two on his motor.