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Author Topic: 1980 TT250 PLASTIC GAS TANK STRIPPING ORIGINAL PAINT???  (Read 1513 times)

Offline advCo

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Re: 1980 TT250 PLASTIC GAS TANK STRIPPING ORIGINAL PAINT???
« Reply #10 on: Mar 21, 2017, 17:09:25 »
so, soapy water and sandpaper until i get down to the plastic a bad idea? a whole bunch of videos on youtube suggest it but it sounds more like its for removing non-original paint.

More work than any paint strippers, but it will work just fine. Since its the original paint, you can just sand it smooth and paint over the existing coat, you don't necessarily have to strip it bare. I find that painting over prepped factory paint can be better than stripping down to bare surface and priming with rattle can primer. Especially on plastics.

Offline irk miller

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Re: 1980 TT250 PLASTIC GAS TANK STRIPPING ORIGINAL PAINT???
« Reply #11 on: Mar 21, 2017, 20:58:22 »
I use straight 100% liquid methylene chloride, nasty stuff. Keep it in a plastic vat. BTW, it comes delivered in a plastic drum.
Do you store it in a polypropylene drum?  There are thousands of types of plastics. Some are resistant to certain chemicals, some are resistant to other chemicals.  You know why many people prefer Viton o rings?  Yeah, it's kind of related to this conversation. 

My statement had nothing to do with plastic or the issue a hand, it was merely a statement in fact.
We're talking about a plastic fuel tank.  Why are you making comments or suggestions that have nothing to do with plastic?

In my powder coating operation I use straight 100% liquid methylene chloride, nasty stuff.
Think about this statement for just one minute.  Why do you use methylene chloride (and acetone) in powder coating?  To remove powder coat, maybe?  There are several types of powder coating, as you know, two of which are thermoplastics or a thermoset polymers.  Polyethylene is a thermoplastic.  Crazy.  So, is it a surprise that a chemical used in removing a thermoplastic may not be good for removing paint from a thermoplastic?

And yes, when you made this comment, which quoted my comment warning against using aircraft stripper, I think you were being a smart ass...

All Aircraft Strippers warn against using them on actual aircraft also. ;D


Here's the deal:  You probably consider yourself a good powder coater.  And you probably consider yourself an expert in the field, as well as one on paint.  Maybe you are.  But for you to advise someone to use a chemical on a plastic, for which you have no idea of the composition, is irresponsible.  I'm sorry you think I'm a dick for pointing it out.  If there is any uncertainty, then it's probably not a good idea to use that chemical on the plastic without further testing on something expendable with the same composition.  Maybe it's fine.  Maybe it's not.  The problem is, if it's not fine then someone is out a tank.  If he doesn't use the chemical, then he's just out some sweat. 

Offline Pwalo

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Re: 1980 TT250 PLASTIC GAS TANK STRIPPING ORIGINAL PAINT???
« Reply #12 on: Mar 22, 2017, 06:49:35 »
I'm with Irk on this one..... don't use aggressive solvent strippers on plastic as you might end up in a world of pain trying to stabilize the surface you have just uncovered to be able to paint it. If it isn't down to the bare plastic anywhere then just prep the factory surface and prime over that. If you strip it down to bare plastic then I'd advise a bit of elbow grease, 180 grit to start and then finish with 320 before using a good plastic etching primer before priming.

"Then it all went base over apex and I ended up in that hedge over there...... Did you see where the bike went?"

Offline julian.allard66

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Re: 1980 TT250 PLASTIC GAS TANK STRIPPING ORIGINAL PAINT???
« Reply #13 on: Mar 23, 2017, 04:10:35 »
I don't think Yamaha painted the tank from new, it was just shiny plastic, they go yellowish with age as a result of petrol staining.
When anyone I've known has tried to paint an mx bike plastic tank, the paint won't stick to the tank.
Try and find a similar age XT 250 tank, it should nearly fit, but the front mountings will be different.

Offline TranceMachineVienna

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Re: 1980 TT250 PLASTIC GAS TANK STRIPPING ORIGINAL PAINT???
« Reply #14 on: Mar 23, 2017, 04:41:13 »
Over the years I found 2K epoxy primer to be the least probable to react with any surface.
Painted the plastics on my RD this way.

I would hand-sand the plastics,degrease and then lay on a few thick layers of epoxy then sand again.