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Author Topic: 1980 KZ250 Cafe Build  (Read 2387 times)

Offline phomeniuk

  • Posts: 23
Re: 1980 KZ250 Cafe Build
« Reply #40 on: Aug 06, 2018, 15:51:44 »
Back at it again. My rear brake light switch wasn't working the greatest due to the return spring being the wrong length and/or tension. I was thinking of ways to replace it since my sour cream container full of return springs didn't seem to have what I was after. Enter a father with a daughter whom has crazy hair. I took a length of 14ga stranded wire and stripped the insulation off of it. I then twisted 3 sets of 2 strands together and then braided them. A little bit of finessing through the holes and I twisted them together. Got the soldering iron out and soldered the twists, letting the wire get pretty hot to give it a nice look and to let the solder deep down. Totally functional and a slick little bit of detail.

Second, and most importantly; the battery. since the outset of this build I knew I wanted to avoid a big lead acid style battery. This left me with few options. LiIon was the obvious option but I refused to spend $200 on a battery. IMHO these companies are out to lunch with their pricing. LiIon batteries have been around for years, yet companies still feel the need to charge an arm and a leg for them. So, during the rebuild I was using one of my Makita 18v drill batteries for testing circuits (I actually did my first 2 test rides with it as well). Granted this was a bit of a roll of the dice with an extra 6V but it gave me the chance to test everything. My final solution was a DeWalt 12V-1.3AH battery. Measured with my voltmeter it comes out at about 13V at the leads, which compared to a standard bike batteries 12.8V is more than acceptable. I've started the bike a dozen times now without fault and it keeps up with the electrics just like a standard bike battery. I'm sure it would have the power to turn over a 750four or anything but for a little one lunger like this it is a perfect solution, especially at the $60 that Home Depot charges. Not to mention I don't have to buy a separate charger for it since I already have a full shed of DeWalt tools.