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Author Topic: CB550 Bobber-Junkyard Dog  (Read 14168 times)

Offline cxman

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Re: CB550 Bobber
« Reply #10 on: Jan 26, 2018, 07:22:38 »
they dont work on vacuum they work on positive windage pressure

just to help confuse you guys here is a write up from one of my mikuni sales catalogs

A pulse fuel pump has four tubes connected to it. One tube connects the fuel tank. Two tubes connect each carburetor and one tube connects the crankcase of the engine. When the engine revolves, the tube connecting the engine delivers fuel with a pulse of pressure at each revolution. The diaphragm pulsates with the pressure. At the top of the pump are two chambers. They are separated by a pair of one way valves. These valves ensure that the fuel that passes through does not come back. Fuel flows from one chamber to the other at one pulse and at the next pulse, fuel moves to the engine. A well maintained pump works at 5,000 pulses per minute.

Function

The bottom end of the engine crankcase is continuously subjected to a high or low pressure with every pulse. This pulse is transferred to the fuel pump by a pulse tube. The pulse line connects the pulse chamber. The pressure of the crankcase is pushed by the pulse through a pair on one way valves and fuel passes continuously, and in a correct measure, to power the engine.
Limitations

A pulse fuel pump has its own limitations. One cannot estimate the fuel pressure capacity while going uphill. The fuel is likely to rise when the vehicle climbs. The amount of fuel is always limited to the pressure or pumping value of the crankcase. It is impossible to create too much pressure with a pulse pump for the carburetors float level. Pressure of the pump slowly decreases as the crank seals and gaskets begin to leak over time.
Mounting

The pump should be mounted, keeping a distance away from the crankcase. If the pump is close to the crankcase, the pulse tube could become damp and the efficiency of pumping fuel will be greatly reduced. The pump should never be mounted on the crankcase of the engine. This is because the engine vibrates. The vibration of the engine will affect the pulsating flow of fuel and the regulated flow of fuel enabled by the pump will be affected. The pulse line must be rigid enough to avoid becoming damp. The best way to mount the pump is to place it higher than the engine. This will ensure that fuel from the engine will not be able to flow back into the chamber of the pump.
« Last Edit: Jan 26, 2018, 07:24:15 by cxman »
1978 CX650 Super Deluxe
1979 XS1100 Special
1974 xl350
1983 cx650 Custom
1973 cb750
1980 cb750
1981 cb650
1982 cb900 c
1974 kawasaki 350 bighorn
1983 GL1100 aspy full dress
1983 GL1100 Nekid
and a bunch of others

Offline JustinLonghorn

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Re: CB550 Bobber
« Reply #11 on: Jan 26, 2018, 08:12:52 »
In.
I'm going to eat your brains and gain your knowledge.

Into The Sunset, CB750 build

TT500 the Animal


Offline john83

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Re: CB550 Bobber
« Reply #13 on: Jan 27, 2018, 21:18:21 »
I forgot to take pictures but I got the motor into the frame today. I took a look in that fuel tank and all was not well. It's rusted all to hell with bits of "liner" flaking off. Instead of dealing with a sketchy thing that needs cleaning and lining, and may or may not send bits of rust and junk into my carbs I just pulled it off. I'll be in the market for a tank now.

Offline john83

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Re: CB550 Bobber
« Reply #14 on: Jan 31, 2018, 18:08:01 »
Engine is in the frame and the exhaust is even mounted. It's about time to let my sparky friend help me with some wiring. I now need to make a decision about what kind of tank I want and get some money together to make it happen.

The more I compare this frame to other hardtails I see online the more I like it. Some people cut out the rear frame down which eliminates your rear engine mounts. Others keep the swing arm as part of the hard tail. I don't like either of these ideas. This one seems to have been done properly.

The paint wasn't done very well apparently. It chips anytime I think about it very hard. I knocked a bunch off getting the engine mounted. It looks pretty thin, probably just one coat. Oh well, I guess that just means I'll get it powder coated next year.

Offline canyoncarver

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Re: CB550 Bobber
« Reply #15 on: Jan 31, 2018, 18:11:21 »
Your bike is even making comstars look good.   I just beg of you not to put a sportster peanut tank on it.   My .02 is a Wassel tank. 

Offline irk miller

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Re: CB550 Bobber
« Reply #16 on: Jan 31, 2018, 18:24:50 »
Shupe said 70s XL tank.   ;)

Offline canyoncarver

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Re: CB550 Bobber
« Reply #17 on: Jan 31, 2018, 19:41:28 »
Shupe said 70s XL tank.   ;)

As in Honda XL or Harley XLCH?

Offline irk miller

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Re: CB550 Bobber
« Reply #18 on: Jan 31, 2018, 20:20:02 »
Honda, of course.  Is that really a question?  :-*

Offline JustinLonghorn

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Re: CB550 Bobber
« Reply #19 on: Jan 31, 2018, 21:24:15 »
That shupe guy, don't trust him.
I'm going to eat your brains and gain your knowledge.

Into The Sunset, CB750 build

TT500 the Animal