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Author Topic: the Hunley or, pidjones needed a retirement project  (Read 8364 times)

Offline pidjones

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Re: the Hunley or, pidjones needed a retirement project
« Reply #70 on: Nov 07, 2018, 10:39:45 »
I found that a ratchet-head 10 mm wrench is a GODSEND for removing timing belt covers without pulling the radiator. Just remove the bottom bolts and lossen the top nuts and block the radiator out some with rags, etc.
"Love 'em all.... Let God sort 'em out!"

Offline Maritime

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Re: the Hunley or, pidjones needed a retirement project
« Reply #71 on: Nov 07, 2018, 10:45:29 »
Yep, done that too. So much easier than removing and replacing Rad.
The GL Rebirth: http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=68337.0
CX500 Low budget Bobber : http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=43617.0
"Beer makes you feel the way you ought to feel without beer" -Henry Lawson
"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." - Thomas Jefferson

Offline pidjones

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Re: the Hunley or, pidjones needed a retirement project
« Reply #72 on: Nov 07, 2018, 18:43:40 »
I just love it when the guilty party(s) are a little obvious. I had planned to put the carb work on the Hunley off until winter, but I finished taking the deck off of the John Deere, scraping the year's buildup from under and pressure washing it and putting it away. Then mounted the blade carrier, snow blade, and chains to ward off bad snows. Not having parts on hand to go forward on the 750, I moved crap around in the garage in preparation for carb work. Rack all set up and ready for disection, I strolled up to check the mail where of course I found brake pistons, tach cable, speedometer cable all for the 750 and the new timing gear for the motor on my little lathe (it may be cheap Chinese tool, but very handy).

So, I thought at least pull the #2 slide cover, slide, and float bowl. The needle looked fine, but I wanted to compare it to another so I pulled #1 (which appears to be great). #2 was a couple mm longer, so I pulled both needles and squinted real hard to read the numbers. Different, of course. Looked in my carb box and sure enough I had one of the originals in it so it was cleaned and installed. I doubt this was my main problem, however. In the float bowl, I found the float way high and croked. That was easy and I doubt it was my main problem, either. But then I pulled the primary and secondary jets and found this o-ring with a guilty look on its face.

So, tomorrow back to brakes on the 750. I hate brakes.
« Last Edit: Nov 07, 2018, 18:48:27 by pidjones »
"Love 'em all.... Let God sort 'em out!"

Offline pidjones

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Re: the Hunley or, pidjones needed a retirement project
« Reply #73 on: Dec 02, 2018, 14:58:53 »
Unless a miracle happens in the next hour or so, I'll probably have to sand the covers and repaint all over again. Temperature 65F and humidity <60%, so I decided to try the Spraymax 2K over the lacquer (already wet sanded). All the prep, coveralls, respirator, goggles, warming the can in warm water, plenty of lighting waiting for months for the one break in the weather. Looks like hell. Milky, runs, yeck. will probably take forever to sand this off, so I may just take the panels to a shop and have them match the Duplicolor in a 2K anddo it all for me. I guess I sound pretty frustrated. I am. I hate having someone else do it, but can admit when I'm no good at something.
"Love 'em all.... Let God sort 'em out!"

Offline MandoSteve

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Re: the Hunley or, pidjones needed a retirement project
« Reply #74 on: Dec 02, 2018, 19:39:48 »
Thatís a beautiful bike and Iíve enjoyed your thread. My own shop has insanely high humidity so I feel your pain. Iíve started putting out those buckets that pull moisture out of the air after my mold adventure. Might not help, but certainly canít hurt. Makes painting finely difficult. I usually drop sheeting for something that requires a deft touch and use fans to push out some of the damp air.


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Offline irk miller

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Re: the Hunley or, pidjones needed a retirement project
« Reply #75 on: Dec 02, 2018, 19:45:16 »
Clear epoxy coatings tend to be milky until fully cured when it's really humid, rainy, and/or cold.  Have you given it plenty of time to cure?  The cold and humidity makes for an extremely slow cure.

Offline pidjones

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Re: the Hunley or, pidjones needed a retirement project
« Reply #76 on: Dec 02, 2018, 21:18:54 »
Clear epoxy coatings tend to be milky until fully cured when it's really humid, rainy, and/or cold.  Have you given it plenty of time to cure?  The cold and humidity makes for an extremely slow cure.
No, and it IS looking a lot better now. Most of the haze is gone. I left them in the shed for about three hours to fully flash and so handling wouldn't be a big issue. Brought them into the heated basement garage for overnight. Tomorrow I'll probably take them upstairs to my den for a few days. Still have the run, but it a non-obvious place. Worst thing is a gnat landed smack in the middle of a shelter cover. Hopefully he will sand out. Or be part of the show. Sure glad I have no painting plans for the CB750F.
"Love 'em all.... Let God sort 'em out!"

Offline Maritime

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Re: the Hunley or, pidjones needed a retirement project
« Reply #77 on: Dec 03, 2018, 09:12:16 »
Let them cure, No one tells you but if you go a little heavy or quick they milk up sometimes, I panicked the first time too but all ended fine. also a lot of sins can be wet sanded out with this stuff as it it hard as hell once fully cure per  the can instructions. Even small runs can be taken out if careful.  Good luck you should be fine.
The GL Rebirth: http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=68337.0
CX500 Low budget Bobber : http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=43617.0
"Beer makes you feel the way you ought to feel without beer" -Henry Lawson
"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." - Thomas Jefferson

Offline pidjones

  • Posts: 1022
Re: the Hunley or, pidjones needed a retirement project
« Reply #78 on: Dec 03, 2018, 10:08:39 »
Let them cure, No one tells you but if you go a little heavy or quick they milk up sometimes, I panicked the first time too but all ended fine. also a lot of sins can be wet sanded out with this stuff as it it hard as hell once fully cure per  the can instructions. Even small runs can be taken out if careful.  Good luck you should be fine.
Thanks! How long to cure? The mfr sez 24 hours to sand, but that seems short.

The gnat will no doubt leave a mark, although small like a dust nit. One run can probably be ignored due to its location right at the back of the shelter cover where it closes in front of the seat. The other (actually double) run is on the top of the shelter and will need sanded and buffed. A few dust nits that I might sand or just live with. Also, I had lightly sanded the lacquer before clear, and there are a few places where it seemed to kill the metallic look and it looks like a dark shadow there. Clear reduced it, but I fear that I should have left the Duplicolor unsanded. Or cleared it with Duplucolor first lightly before the 2K, because the previous time that I used lacquer clear, it brought the metalic glint back.

I think the main thing I've learned is that for future work, I need to find someone with a good booth that will do this at a reasonable price.
« Last Edit: Jan 25, 2019, 20:33:53 by pidjones »
"Love 'em all.... Let God sort 'em out!"

Offline irk miller

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Re: the Hunley or, pidjones needed a retirement project
« Reply #79 on: Dec 03, 2018, 10:21:32 »
I should dig up pics, but my dad restored a bunch of cars growing up: several Roadrunners, a Charger, two Cudas, two Thunderbirds, my Gramma's Cordobas, all painted outside in South Carolina in the summer.  His paint jobs were flawless once wet sanded and rubbed out.  You can imagine the bugs in the air (especially mosquitios) in a southern summer.