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Author Topic: 1976 CB750F Canadian Cafe!  (Read 391 times)

Offline RaM

  • Posts: 5
1976 CB750F Canadian Cafe!
« on: May 09, 2018, 18:20:33 »
Hi Everyone,
First post, been lurking on these forums for a while. Figured I'd better start a build thread now that I'm finally starting on my project.

Backstory:
I was helping out some folks cleaning up a storage yard for an auction 2 years ago. One guy had a 1976 cb750F that had been sitting inside a seacan for the past 6 years. Funny enough he knew I had been talking about working on a cafe project so once he remembered it was there he offered me the bike for free provided I could get it home. Long story short, got the bike out of there (and a crate full of extra parts they had accumulated over the years) and kept it at my Grandfather's shop. I intended to start work on it as soon as I finished my home reno project but as soon as that finished I ended up taking a work contract overseas in the Netherlands for 6 months which put the project on hiatus. Fast forward to this spring and I'm back home in Ontario, the bike is in my garden shed (yes that's right, no garage for me, small basement workshop only) and I'm starting my build.

Unfortunately I didn't get a shot of the bike inside the seacan but here's the bike after I got it back to the shop. Extra parts piled up behind it.


He was adament that the bike should run and start no problem. I was skeptical but after getting new plugs, a charged battery, oil inside, and gas in the tank (carbs leaked, surprise...) it started! don't have the video uploaded anywhere but we got her to run. Sounded like it was firing on all 4 cylinders as well. haven't compression tested the engine but that's a future item.

Anyways, the bike was in no condition to take for a road test, both front and rear brakes need to be rebuilt and tires are cracked all over. Bike also would drain the battery like crazy, some electrical short somewhere which isn't surprising given the rats nest of wiring on this thing.
Elected to start the teardown and start building at least knowing that the engine runs

I'll post some pics of the teardown, but here are the two bikes I'm using as inspiration. I want to model this after the ultra noir feature on bike exif for styling. I do have the 78 tank in good condition so that's a plus! However, since this is my first bike build I'm not going to go crazy on mods. That means no gsxr front end for me, going to stick with stock forks. I love the spoked look so going to try and salvage these rims/spokes and get them blacked out. Also using the hookie co. Aldedo bike as inspiration since I love how they kept alot of stock components on the front end like the top triple and forks.



Thanks all! stay tuned. Since I'm now working in a non-heated shed I have the next 6 months to get this wrapped up before winter hits. Hoping to at least get it on the road once before then.


Offline The Jimbonaut

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Re: 1976 CB750F Canadian Cafe!
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2018, 19:03:26 »
Hey Ram, great looking project mate, welcome from Montreal =)
"I'm telling you Donnie, nuthin' but nuthin' but right"

Offline The Limey

  • Posts: 375
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Re: 1976 CB750F Canadian Cafe!
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2018, 03:21:28 »
For the love of Trump, don't use an F2 tank.  That kink at the bottom/rear looks awful.
I was born a rocker.  I'll die a rocker.  And I'm proud of it.

Re: 1976 CB750F Canadian Cafe!
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2018, 06:31:51 »
I love that stealth black look. This should be a fun build!

Sent from my A1601 using DO THE TON mobile app


Offline Maritime

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Re: 1976 CB750F Canadian Cafe!
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2018, 09:32:55 »
Nice, welcome from the Maritimes. Please dont put firestones on it. Put some good tires, the rest of the inspiration bikes look ok. Cheers
The GL Rebirth: http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=68337.0
CX500 Low budget Bobber : http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=43617.0
"Beer makes you feel the way you ought to feel without beer" -Henry Lawson
"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." - Thomas Jefferson

Offline RaM

  • Posts: 5
Re: 1976 CB750F Canadian Cafe!
« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2018, 10:48:47 »
Thanks for the welcomes!
I agree Hill Billy, I love that stealth black look, hoping to do something really similar, maybe with a touch of colour here or there. For the tank I plan on using the same one as in the black photo, not the hookie tank. Limey was that the kink tank you were referring to? otherwise somehow i'm not seeing it on the black one. And tires for sure won't be firestones ;)

Update from last night. Took apart all 4 carbs for cleaning/rebuild. Condition isn't too bad but the gaskets are hard as rock. Ordered 4 complete rebuild kits from 4into1 today. Obligatory Canadian beer during disassembly  ;).


I'm mostly in teardown mode, pulling everything apart & cleaning before I go wild and order a bunch of new parts. Couple of questions for the crowd before I do:
- Any tips for softening up the rubber carb boots? they're pretty damn hard.
- I'm a short and relatively light guy, 5'8", 160lbs. I'm thinking of lowering the bike overall by about 1" with shorter rear shocks and sliding the fork tubes up in the triple. Does anyone see an issue on bottoming out if I have an upswept tail hoop?
- I have no idea even where to start on upholstery. Thinking about a DCC seat and hoop to match. The 24" seat length seems long, and brings the end of seat inline to the rear of the sprocket. that normal? I'm sure I could always shorten the seat if I mock it up and don't like it.
- With clip-ons will the stock M.C. work at the change in angle? I'm sticking with the single disc setup, this is an urban commuter and won't see a track.
- Any other must-do's? I'm planning on rebuilding everything critical, new modern bearings everywhere, swingarm bushings, stainless brake lines, etc...

Thanks all

Offline Maritime

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Re: 1976 CB750F Canadian Cafe!
« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2018, 10:56:06 »
Good beer choice ;D Don't replace the stock jets if they are not damaged, the OEM are better and can be cleaned. the ones in rebuild kits can be suspect and cause you grief. Actually all the brass should be cleanable and not replaced with aftermarket, Gaskets and seals yes for sure. The DCC seats are ok, don't make it too short, they look funny but you are correct, you can shorten it if it appears too long. 1" on the shocks and forks is probably ok, but the way to check is to take the springs off the shocks, mount them and let them compress all the way, if nothing hits or rubs you're fine, if you get a rub, adjust.
The GL Rebirth: http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=68337.0
CX500 Low budget Bobber : http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=43617.0
"Beer makes you feel the way you ought to feel without beer" -Henry Lawson
"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." - Thomas Jefferson

Offline The Limey

  • Posts: 375
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Re: 1976 CB750F Canadian Cafe!
« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2018, 18:46:39 »
Don't use comstars either.  Nothing wrong with them, but it's the sort of thing Isambard Kingdom Brunel used on his cafe racers several hundred years ago.

Other than that, you've a nice base to start from.
I was born a rocker.  I'll die a rocker.  And I'm proud of it.

Offline jpmobius

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Re: 1976 CB750F Canadian Cafe!
« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2018, 19:42:35 »
Good beer choice ;D Don't replace the stock jets if they are not damaged, the OEM are better and can be cleaned. the ones in rebuild kits can be suspect and cause you grief. Actually all the brass should be cleanable and not replaced with aftermarket, Gaskets and seals yes for sure. The DCC seats are ok, don't make it too short, they look funny but you are correct, you can shorten it if it appears too long. 1" on the shocks and forks is probably ok, but the way to check is to take the springs off the shocks, mount them and let them compress all the way, if nothing hits or rubs you're fine, if you get a rub, adjust.

This is excellent advice!  Especially about the carbs.  Evidently you have bought rebuild kits - DON'T USE ANY OF THE PARTS EXCEPT GASKETS !!!.  I do a fair bit of carb work, and RARELY need parts except diaphragms,O-rings, seals, and gaskets.  Unless your original parts are very obviously broken or otherwise butchered, keep using them.  Needle/seat assemblies can be polished with a Q-tip and rubbing compound and will usually work better than a new assembly, and all the original jets and needles are of better quality than aftermarket and in the main never wear out.

On rebuilding your bike in general, get the whole thing mechanically and ergonomically built up first.  You will be well served to keep the stock wheel diameters and ride height.  Don't increase the rim widths by more than 1 size and fit the correctly sized tires for the rims.  Figure out where you want your seat to be, then sit on your bike and determine where you want the foot pegs and handlebars to be.  Fool around with this process until you are completely comfortable for 20-30 minutes in riding position.  I find this usually takes several "sittings" and a LOT of beer before getting things right, but it is the cheapest and most important tech you will ever put into your bike.  Make every thing else you do to your bike work around these things - not the other way around.  Get all the electrical work, cables, brake lines, and all the hardware that relates to them finished like you want them to be permanently, and then get the bike running and driving.  It only has to be good enough to see that everything works including the charging system, so you don't actually have to be able to drive it.  The goal here is to get all the mechanical modifications sorted out first before you have to work around any expensive finish work and risk damage, or worse, modifications that you weren't able to anticipate.  Once you have all the complicated work done, you can take it all back apart and make everything beautiful and replace all the wheel and suspension bearings as it goes back together.  On extensively modified bikes, I might have the thing apart and all back together half a dozen times before I go to paint, but even on a bone stock restoration, it all happens at LEAST one full go round.  Never doubt that a great many bikes you see in photographs are not all that great to drive, so stay focused on building your own bike to work great first.  That way you will enjoy riding it just as much as admiring it.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2018, 19:45:50 by jpmobius »
Mobius


On a long enough timeline, the survival rate for everyone drops to zero.

1973 RD350 Yamaha build  http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=66498.0

Offline RaM

  • Posts: 5
Re: 1976 CB750F Canadian Cafe!
« Reply #9 on: May 11, 2018, 10:36:14 »
Thanks for the advice guys. All good stuff, it's easy to get ahead of myself and want to solve everything at once. I figured since it's all apart now, best bet is to do all the work once but like you said, it's more than likely i'll be taking this all apart again to change something I didn't anticipate. better yet to sit on it and get a feel for the bike so I don't end up with $500 worth of parts I don't want to use...

Thanks for the tips on the carbs. I do have rebuild kits on order but no big deal, I'll use all the gaskets and o-rings and keep the stock brass.

Offline RaM

  • Posts: 5
Re: 1976 CB750F Canadian Cafe!
« Reply #10 on: May 15, 2018, 13:11:29 »
So I took apart the brakes last night. Both need a rebuild at the caliper as well as the master cylinders for both front and rear.
Can anyone comment on:
- Is it worth it to rebuild stock M.C's ?
- If not, I'd also like to modernize the look of the handlebars and run sportier controls anyways. budget always being a concern, what do people think of the ebay jobbies? something like these: https://www.amazon.ca/Universal-Motorcycle-Clutch-Cylinder-Reservoir/dp/B06XYLFY5L/ref=pd_sbs_263_2?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=VQ3XP4APXSDCFPDBGVV5
Worth it to take a risk on or are they garbage? rebuild kit would run me more than half the cost of just buying these outright.

Offline Maritime

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Re: 1976 CB750F Canadian Cafe!
« Reply #11 on: May 15, 2018, 13:17:32 »
I have experience with both and the OEM honda is way better than the no name aftermarket, that being said you can get a good used newer model honda that likely doesn't need a rebuild for the cost of the aftermarket.  For example, I had an aftermarket one on my GL1000 and it worked, but it was a bit soft and I didn't like the feel of it. I got hit by a deer on the bike so that one got thrashed, when I re-did the bike I got a mid 90's CBR master in good used shape, It works so much better and it was an upgrade to the stock brakes as well. with it and braided stainless lines the bike stops better than it ever did new.  I picked it up for 30 bucks or so on Ebay. took a few weeks to get a good one to show up but worth the wait.  I got the Galfer lines with the double banjo from the master and they are very nice.\





here are some pics of the setup
« Last Edit: May 15, 2018, 13:25:02 by Maritime »
The GL Rebirth: http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=68337.0
CX500 Low budget Bobber : http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=43617.0
"Beer makes you feel the way you ought to feel without beer" -Henry Lawson
"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." - Thomas Jefferson