1982 CB750F... The resto-not

The Jimbonaut

Active Member
Dig this idea a lot. I'll see if I can get something like these spinner spools with a long stem -



- and bolt them into the lower shock mount. I'm all over that like a hobo on a ham sandwich.
 

The Jimbonaut

Active Member
Started cleaning up all the oil, grease, muck and shite off the lump -



- thankfully it's not as bad as Rhonda's. No beauty either, but in better knick. After dicking about for 5 minutes with a toothbrush between the fins I figured there had to be a better way. Better way = bigger brush...the chain brush worked like a champ. It's a bit...flicky. Be prepared to wear plenty of crap, and don't be surprised if you're flooded with compliments on your new freckles.
 

The Jimbonaut

Active Member
Also discovered that at least one of the valve cover bolts has stripped the threads in the head. Time for more TimeSert shopping?
 

pidjones

Active Member
The Jimbonaut said:
Also discovered that at least one of the valve cover bolts has stripped the threads in the head. Time for more TimeSert shopping?
I found that a PO had not only replaced some valve cover bolts with regular (and, wrong-threaded) bolts, they cracked one of the cam holders - I suspect by forcing in the wrong bolt.

BTW, this is what I did to use a pit stand on the GoldWing. The stand is a Harbor Freight, the adapter from Amazon, and the spools made out of aluminum slugs that came in RF line sections in place of decouplers. I had to order Grade 12 Allen bolts to get them long enough.

 

The Jimbonaut

Active Member
That looks sharp - I like it. Thanks for the idea - the centre stand Will Be Ditched.

About the stripped cam holder(s) - is this a helicoil/timesert fix or are new cam holders buyable? Can you replace just one?
 

pidjones

Active Member
I had to buy a full set from ebay, but only $40, so better than I hoped. He not only stripped it, he split the holder so it must be replaced. Check all of yours to make sure you don't have similar damage. I will go through the ones I receive and pick what fits best (supposed to be line bored, so I'll be checking oil hole alignment as well as plastigauge clearance. Once mine is taken care of, I'd be happy to send you what I don't use.
BTW, I will be replacing "L" cap. I just hope the one coming in is a good fit.
 

The Jimbonaut

Active Member
That's very generous of you, thanks man I appreciate the offer very much. The threads looks pretty dicky in most of them, and from what I remember not many of the bolts "bite" when their shoulder snugs up. I think most - if not all - will need switching out. I did look on eBay last night but came up short - I'll keep my eyes open.

Plastiguage. Something I'm familiar with but have never used. You apply some of the stuff to the surface(s) whose gap you want to measure and then make the measurement by comparing the spread pattern to a chart? Something like that I think.

Thanks again, I hope the holders you bought do the job.
 

teazer

Active Member
DTT BOTM WINNER
Plastiguage is interesting. It's a thin rod of plastic. Break off a length and place it on the clean bearing journal and bolt down the cap. Do not allow the shaft to rotate. Remove the cap and use the guide on the packet to measure the clearance. It comes in different thicknesses, so order a pack that covers the specified clearance.
 

pidjones

Active Member
Jimbo, I think that as long as your caps are not cracked Timesert or Helicoil would be your best bet. But be careful drilling for them! You don't have far before the bearing journal. Don't know why these would be overtightened - you just have to compress the rubber seal, and at some point they go metal-to-metal with the flange on the bolt and the cap. I tighten mine on both the GoldWings and the CB750F with a 10mm socket on a screwdriver handle.
 

The Jimbonaut

Active Member
I don't know why either - seems like an over-zealous PO took out their frustrations on the valve cover at some point. Steel and aluminium - bad combo if you've eaten too many Weetabix.
 

The Jimbonaut

Active Member
Happy new year one and all. Here comes another fucker...let's hope it's a goody.

Ok, still cleaning up the engine. It's not the most exciting work. So, until there's more exciting things to document, discuss and report on here are a bunch of photos of the lump in different positions on my workbench.











I like this picture. The engine looks like its just given up, and face-planted...



Degreaser, soapy water and a fuckload of brake cleaner. Ran out of all three so the first Canadian Tire trip of 2019 looms large. I'm gonna be painting this thing eventually - it's been painted once before. I hesitate to say badly as I've never painted an engine before. For all I know it's really really hard to paint an engine and whoever did it did a pretty damn good job. But it certainly doesn't look great - the paint is peeling in places and there are runs all over the thing. Any and all input on How To Paint A Motorcycle Engine will be very gratefully received.

Oh, and my Mum gave me the three ratcheting wrenches I was missing for Christmas. Go the Mums.
 

pidjones

Active Member
On my GL1000 engine I used two different engine cleaners, and one worked muck better (but I don't recall which). I also did a final soap and water bath, rinse, and finished with isopropyl alcohol. I brush painted it with POR-15 engine paint (but then I really dig the MG Maroon color that is available in it). Seems really well adhered and tough.
 

The Jimbonaut

Active Member
Oh shit. Totally forgot I had some of that stuff. I bought some last year and shelved it - is it a good de-greaser as well?


Sent from my iPhone using DO THE TON
 

irk miller

You've been mostly-dead all day.
DTT BOTM WINNER
Pretty sure it's a de-everything cleaner. You might have to take a stiff nylon brush to areas where there's a lot of build up, or the dirt/oil barnacles, but it all comes clean.
 

adventurco

Nick Ol' Eye
DTT BOTM WINNER
I recommend giving everything a final wipe down with acetone before paint. It works great to get any residual grease or oil from your hands, etc off the aluminum.

Also, I typically have a motor broken down and paint the pieces individually, but since you're painting it mostly together I would pop off the left and ride case covers, mask the gasket surfaces off and paint them separately. That way, you don't have covers that you may need to remove one day "painted in" to the cases resulting in cracks and chips when you pull them.
 

The Jimbonaut

Active Member
That was the plan mate - pull off the side covers (plus the oil filter cover, valve cover, starter motor cover and a few others), mask the thing up and have at it. The engine's been painted before - do I need to get all that paint off first, or is it enough to rub down the rough spots, knock off the loose stuff, hit everything with primer and then the VHT?
 

adventurco

Nick Ol' Eye
DTT BOTM WINNER
The Jimbonaut said:
That was the plan mate - pull off the side covers (plus the oil filter cover, valve cover, starter motor cover and a few others), mask the thing up and have at it. The engine's been painted before - do I need to get all that paint off first, or is it enough to rub down the rough spots, knock off the loose stuff, hit everything with primer and then the VHT?
I'd get all the flaking crap off and see what it looks like. If you have chipped spots they will need to be sanded down and blended or you'll see them in the paint. You'd probably only notice it in the flatter areas like side covers, the top of the cases etc. If its really bad you may want to remove all the paint with aircraft stripper or other paint stripper, just be sure its safe for aluminum.
 
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