1982 Suzuki GN125

Luugo86

'73 CB350, '78 XS650 Cafe Killer
I recently purchased a 1982 Suzuki GN125 in very good original condition for a very low price. I know this may not be the most desirable of metric bikes, but I personally really like it. It had 1070 original miles on the clock, a fresh top end and carb rebuild, new tires, starter and battery when I bought it. It is one of the most pleasant riding bikes I have ever owned. I live in Amish country so there is basically nothing but farm back roads around me and this bike is perfect for them.
The plan is to ride the wheels off of it until the end of riding season. Not gonna try to fix something that isn't broken. I would like to upgrade the suspension front and rear, put some new brake shoes on it, put some of the mini-indicators on, and probably change the dash set up to just a mini-speedo unit... The clutch and front brake levers are pretty squishy, so I will probably replace those with some smaller adjustable units. Overall I am very happy with this little around-town scoot. If anyone has any experience/tips with these bikes or knowledge of a good source for OEM/repop parts I would be grateful to hear about them.
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Maritime

Over 10,000 Posts
There is a good build thread on here for one of these. I think it was even nominated fir botm. Check it out. It was a scrambler I think
 

Rider52

Coast to Coast
When the Rick Case Motorcycle dealerships folded in Ohio I bought one at their auction. He was stripping new bikes for parts and this one had lost the rear wheel. I found a wheel assembly that worked with some spacing and we rode it quite a bit. It was a lot of fun. I never had to do anything to it and I gave it to a friend when we left Ohio.
 

Luugo86

'73 CB350, '78 XS650 Cafe Killer
missing bolt.jpeg

So as you can see on the top right part of the cylinder there is a missing bolt. It rattled loose when I was riding home yesterday and was lost somewhere along the road. I have a few questions and hoping someone can lend some advice. First is what the hell is the purpose of this bolt hole/bolt. I looked through the manual at all the diagrams and this bolt hole is on the diagrams but it is not labeled in any of them. Second question is does anyone have any ideas where I can find a replacement.. the local hardware store was a bust. Thank you guys.
 

irk miller

You've been mostly-dead all day.
DTT BOTM WINNER
That's a cam chain guide pivot bolt. It holds the top of the guide. It's a special bolt, with a copper washer.
 
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irk miller

You've been mostly-dead all day.
DTT BOTM WINNER
Also, don't move anything! It looks like the holes are still lined up. If the guide drops, you're going to have a blast trying to get it back up there to get the bolt in.
 

Luugo86

'73 CB350, '78 XS650 Cafe Killer
Thanks a lot Irk, I really appreciate it man. I put a piece of welding filler rod in there to hold it in place. I don't know how long I was riding after it rattled out.. I don't think it could have been long if it's still aligned.
 

Luugo86

'73 CB350, '78 XS650 Cafe Killer
I looked in there with a light and could see through to the groove on the other side of the channel that is in there. I didn't see anything in the channel itself, what would I see if the cam chain guide had fallen in?
 

irk miller

You've been mostly-dead all day.
DTT BOTM WINNER
The guide has a metal sleeve cast into the rubber. You should see that. If it has dropped, you should see or feel the top of the guide. Make sure it didn't move up, since that's the direction of the engine rotation. If it dropped, you might be able to push it up cranking the motor, but I doubt it. Otherwise, you have to pull the stator cover and try to get to the bottom of it and push it up. The tensioner has to be released to make that work. Unfortunately, the Suzuki guides hinge by one bolt at the top, where the Hondas that use the same top tensioner design, have an attachment at the bottom of the guide.
 

Luugo86

'73 CB350, '78 XS650 Cafe Killer
The guide has a metal sleeve cast into the rubber. You should see that. If it has dropped, you should see or feel the top of the guide. Make sure it didn't move up, since that's the direction of the engine rotation. If it dropped, you might be able to push it up cranking the motor, but I doubt it. Otherwise, you have to pull the stator cover and try to get to the bottom of it and push it up. The tensioner has to be released to make that work. Unfortunately, the Suzuki guides hinge by one bolt at the top, where the Hondas that use the same top tensioner design, have an attachment at the bottom of the guide.
Thanks again Irk, you're the man. I will order up that part and get at it. Also, I don't want this next bolt rattling loose like the other.. do you have any suggestion for a certain thread-locker to use?
 

Luugo86

'73 CB350, '78 XS650 Cafe Killer
I was taking a good look at this again with a light and while in the photo I posted I can see a bit of the black rubber from the guide, I think it may have slid down before I put something in there to hold it in place... Looking in there this morning I couldn't see anything, just the cast metal of the cylinder.
 

irk miller

You've been mostly-dead all day.
DTT BOTM WINNER
Pull the stator cover first. You may have to pull the flywheel, but most of the time you can get to it from there. Don't pull the valve cover until you've gone through the stator cover. It's not that dire yet.
 

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