"A Bird in the Hand" take 2. DR650 Deadtail Bobber

Hurco550

Keep er' Between the Ditches
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While at Barber, I ran into a several time acquaintance named Butch, who is a big time elsinore guy. I actually sold him some parts a few years back. Anyhow, I took the tank over to him after purchasing it and he gave me some insight on the repairs. Unfortunately with the alloy tanks, you pretty much have to push dents out from the inside, meaning that I will likely have to cut a section out of the tunnel, push out the dents, then weld the section back in. It'll take some doing, but I'm sure I can manage it...
 

teazer

Over 1,000 Posts
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The way that Yamaha alloy TZ tanks are usually repaired is to cut a small rectangle out of the bottom of the tank to get spoons in to hammer and dolly the dents out then weld the rectangle access door back in place. Using air pressure to try to blow the dent out often destroys the tank as it peels it open.
 

Tanshanomi

New Member
The way that Yamaha alloy TZ tanks are usually repaired is to cut a small rectangle out of the bottom of the tank to get spoons in to hammer and dolly the dents out then weld the rectangle access door back in place. Using air pressure to try to blow the dent out often destroys the tank as it peels it open.
On two past projects, I created a pusher by putting a mushroom head (slightlty smaller than the filler opening) on the end of a length of rebar, then bending it however necessary to allow the head to push against the inside of the dent while the other end is in line with it outside the other side of the tank. Then, just some gentle pushing can coax the tank back into shape.
Sorry for the kindergarten-grade sketch, but I'm in the middle of my workday right now:

IMG_3168.jpg


It works, but there's several caveats:
  1. It takes a lot of crazy bending with lots of time-consuming trial and error to come up with an arrangement that will fit in through the filler hole, have a clear path into position, and still allow you to push directly on the dent.
  2. The more bends you have, the more stout your rod needs to be, so that your force goes against the dent rather than just bending the rod. You might even need to create some braces to triangulate it in places.
  3. You probably won't have much back-and-forth travel once you get your tool in place, so you might need extract and re-bend the tool several times in order to fully push out a deep dent.
  4. You have to be REALLY careful you don't distort the filler opening. On the first tank I tried this with, I carelessly banged the rod against the lip too hard, too often. I got the dent out just fine, but discovered on my first ride that the cap didn't seal properly. Fixing that was more of a nightmare than the dent removal.
 

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