Black Oxide for Bolts after Evaporust?

Kags1969

New Member
I recently picked up three project bikes, two quite ratty (a CL100 and a CL350). As I am disassembling them to make slightly less ratty I am dropping all of the rusty nuts and bolts into evaporust to clean the rust off. I am trying to decide if black oxide treatment after that would take after evaporust. I dont have a blast cabinet and wanted to see if anyone has done this and how were your results? I am looking at the Eastwood kit.
 
never tried it but I usually blast the parts that are not getting painted with WD-40 or oil to prevent new flash rust.
 
I'm all for restoring and reusing parts, but bolts are cheap ;)

If you can find the Honda Parts Manual, their parts numbers clearly provide the metric size of every bolt on the bike. When I did my CB550F I made a database of all the nuts and bolts and washers and replaced most of them on the bike with stainless socket cap etc.
 
I'm all for restoring and reusing parts, but bolts are cheap ;)

If you can find the Honda Parts Manual, their parts numbers clearly provide the metric size of every bolt on the bike. When I did my CB550F I made a database of all the nuts and bolts and washers and replaced most of them on the bike with stainless socket cap etc.
SS ain't cheap but it's really the way to go unless you are trying to do a strict restoration.
 
SS ain't cheap but it's really the way to go unless you are trying to do a strict restoration.
Black oxide will still rust , you need some kind od zinc or phosphate coating , I do jet ski repair and have buckets of stainless steel bolts so I mostlt use stainless steel on everything.
 
I refer to RBC Bearing's test when thinking of material and coatings for corrosion prevention.

To quote the setup,

"1.0 Testing Procedures
Testing was conducted by Dayton T. Brown test facility in Bohemia, New York. The testing was done in accordance with RTCA/DO-160G, section 14.3.6.7 Performance of the Severe Salt Fog test (Category T), with one modification done to the duration of testing. The parts were supported in a chamber and exposed to a salt fog. The parts were exposed for 48 hours and then dried in ambient temperature for 24 hours. The exposure and drying cycles were repeated three times for a total of four (4) 48-hour exposure cycles and four (4) 24-hour drying cycles, 288 hours in total."
 

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