Norton Dominator 99

goldy

Member
DTT BOTM WINNER
Just when I thought I was happy with my motorcycle fleet....I did it again.

Picked this up last week from a friend who is moving and doesn't want want to drag it along with him. I'm not planning on starting this until later in the year, but when I do I'll start regularly posting. Most of the machine is "there" although I will have to fabricate, or purchase some missing items. It's definately going to be a full restoration...too many of these things have been turned into Domiracers, not many of the original machines around any more.
 

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pidjones

Well-Known Member
Good on ya for planning a restore. I have a '79 GoldWing that I plan to restore over the next couple winters. I expect it to be much harder than the restomod.
 

Maritime

Well-Known Member
pidjones said:
Good on ya for planning a restore. I have a '79 GoldWing that I plan to restore over the next couple winters. I expect it to be much harder than the restomod.
it will be because there are some bits if you don't have them, they are hard to find in good shape if at all.
 

Maritime

Well-Known Member
Nice score. hard to see what you really have until you remove all the layers of dust and dirt.
 

Rider52

Member
Great find! I am not exactly what you would call a brit fan, but I would love to have that project in my garage.
 

goldy

Member
DTT BOTM WINNER
Ok...I couldn't wait to get started...wanted to see what was under all that rust and grunge...and get the wheels back under it so it would be easier to roll around the shop.
The front fender really surprised me as it cleaned up very well, in fact, so well that I don't think I will bother replacing it, the back fender was the same story. Primary cover was not such a happy tale, but I do have the option of painting it black. The wheels will need new spokes and rims, but I already have the rims; picked them up for a very good price at the local swap meet a couple of years ago. The engine turned out to be seized, but I let it soak for a couple of weeks before removing the head and giving the piston crowns a smack with a piece of hardwood and a 2lb hammer...they broke free and then the cylinders were removed to to reveal a really clean looking crankcase...camshaft is in perfect condition. My son helped me get the front end, rear shocks and wheels under it, so now I can shove it around when it gets in the way. I'm not sure what I'll do next, probably remove the engine and transmission, then they will be ready and waiting whenever I am.
 

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goldy

Member
DTT BOTM WINNER
Engine and transmission are now out of the frame along with the oil tank and battery box. Going to need to get the cylinders sleeved as they are messed up from being seized and are at their last overbore...ether that, or I'll try to locate a second hand set that still has some life in 'em. The crank needs a regrind too, being 0.003" out of round, but at least this will be it's first regrind. So far, everything else looks good to go. Got some spokes on the way to fit the new SS rims I already had in stock...they were a sweet deal at our autumn swap meet a few years ago at $80.00 for the pair.
 

teazer

Active Member
DTT BOTM WINNER
Sleeves in that barrel might be a problem if teh barrels are iron like a Trumpet, but if they are alloy, that's the way to go.
 

teazer

Active Member
DTT BOTM WINNER
That's good to know.

On a Triumph with cast iron barrels, if they are sleeved, they tend to blow up and leave the lower flange on the crankcases. I had a race T120 motor do that to me one. I didn't realize it had been sleeved on one side and the barrels came apart in spectacular fashion. First motor that blew up around me. Pieces were embedded in the shop door.

The Norton barrels are clearly a better design than that.
 

goldy

Member
DTT BOTM WINNER
Ok, got a few things looked after...New rims and spokes fitted, along with new tires. Rebuilt the forks, new seals and tubes. I did manage to find a decent set of barrels that were at a 0.020" overbore, they cleaned up perfectly with the hone, so no need to hit the machine shop with these ones.
 

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goldy

Member
DTT BOTM WINNER
After a busy summer, I have gotten back at the Norton project right on time. Fabricated a set of fork shrouds and headlight mounts that I am pretty happy with...I don't think anybody will know the difference between these and the original equipment. Also working on an instrument bracket...will post photos in another day or two. So why fabricate when you can buy 'em?...simple answer is: a lack of money, an abundance of time, bragging rights and fun.
 

goldy

Member
DTT BOTM WINNER
Here are those photos I promised...the shrouds and headlight mounts are only coated in black primer...and those old instruments and the scabby old headlight are only there to fill in the spaces...new ones are on the way. I like to put things together before applying the final finish, saves a lot of headaches on final assembly.
 

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