1971 CB750 K1 Rider Resto (On the road again!)

swan

Kickstart, shift on right, drum brakes and spokes
DTT BOTM WINNER
Re: 1971 CB750 K1 Rider Resto

Awesome! Nice new parts, beautiful photos and techniques.

Who did your plating? Cost?
 

edhaeuser

Been Around the Block
Re: 1971 CB750 K1 Rider Resto

swan said:
Awesome! Nice new parts, beautiful photos and techniques.

Who did your plating? Cost?

Thanks, I'm learning from you Jon :)

Plating was done by D&B plating up around Minneapolis. Price was $75.00 if I remember correctly. I just started calling numbers up in that area. They were the only ones interested enough to request a picture of the parts to give an accurate quote. Sent the parts up via Speedee.
 

edhaeuser

Been Around the Block
Re: 1971 CB750 K1 Rider Resto

Nhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ikKeVNBAmQQ&feature=youtube_gdata_playerext. I am trying something totally different for the wheels. I am going tubeless on spoked wheels.

I met a gentleman while I was working in Japan last year who manufactures motorcycle parts. One of his products is a tubeless kit for spoked rims. He is a great guy and we have become good friends. I have discussed the possibility of distributing these kits and some of his exhaust systems in the US. I finally have the opportunity to try one of the tubless kits so I am giving it a shot.


Here is a youtube video of him installing the kit on a wheel:


Tubeless kit for rim / Supermoto, DUCATI, OUTEX

Of course mine did not end up that neat.

First, I ground down any spokes that protruded from the nipple

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Then I covered the nipples with the supplied tape dots from the kit. I assume these allow the nipple to be adjusted after the kit is installed. It is very important to degrease and clean the rim before starting.

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Then I installed the double sided tape. This is some really interesting stuff. Very soft and gooey tape with a green colored plastic backing which gets peeled off after application. It was a challenge to get this tape down into the concave rim, but not impossible. It looks pretty rough with the backing still on it, but better after removing the backing.

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tape applied and removing the backing

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Then I applied the protective plastic tape that goes over the double sided tape.

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Here is the tire pumped up and ready to go!

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And, here are some of the advantages of the tubeless kit according to my friend Masato. (the guy who produces the kit)

1. Greatly reduced risk of blowouts
2. Improved handling, less unsprung weight
3. Race proven and popular with many factory riders in Japan
4. Easy application and durable construction
5. Tyre changes made quick and easy
6. Specialised, clear, triple layer construction
7. Easily repairable in the event of a snapped spoke

Not listed here, and one of the main advantages for me is the fact that if you do get a puncture, it is usually a much slower loss of air and you don't have to remove the wheel to do a roadside repair. All that one needs to do is install a tubeless type plug in the tire and be on your way.
 

edhaeuser

Been Around the Block
Re: 1971 CB750 K1 Rider Resto

I had sent out to have most of the hardware to be plated but of course I missed some. Luckily, I have a caswell plating kit to do the pieces I missed. After working on plating this morning I realized why I sent most of the parts out. It is very time consuming to prep and plate even a few items.

It took me almost all morning to plate these parts and a few others.

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I am also soaking most of the chrome pieces in vinegar tonight to ssee how that works.

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swan

Kickstart, shift on right, drum brakes and spokes
DTT BOTM WINNER
Re: 1971 CB750 K1 Rider Resto

Ed, looking good.

I see the advantages to a tubeless set up, but what if you need to tighten or loosen a spoke in the future? Let's hope you trued the rims perfectly.
 

jchek779

Leave the gun. Take the cannoli.
Re: 1971 CB750 K1 Rider Resto

I used wood bleach from Sherwin Williams to clean the rust off of my chrome parts. It was $10 for the bleach powder. I put all my pieces in a rubbermaid tub, filled it with enough water to cover all of my chrome pieces, then mixed in the bleach powder. I let it sit over night, gave it a stir in the morning, then let it sit all day. The oxalyc acid in the bleach took all of the rust off without damaging the good chrome. You may want to try that if the vinegar doesn't work.
 

edhaeuser

Been Around the Block
Re: 1971 CB750 K1 Rider Resto

swan said:
Ed, looking good.

I see the advantages to a tubeless set up, but what if you need to tighten or loosen a spoke in the future? Let's hope you trued the rims perfectly.

That's what the little dots are for that I put on each nipple. They allow the nipple to turn without tearing up the thick rubbery tape. I would think it would take at least 3 full turns of the nipple for the spoke to work through the tape. The directions say to let the air out to true the wheel. It is also possible to cut out and replace a small section if one needs to replace a broken spoke.

Vinegar soaked overnight with little progress...may have to try the wood bleach.
 

swan

Kickstart, shift on right, drum brakes and spokes
DTT BOTM WINNER
Re: 1971 CB750 K1 Rider Resto

Sorry, got it, I was not fully awake this morning. From the images I thought you ground off the threaded ends of the spokes which would not allow them to turn. Cool set up.
 

K4

Active Member
Re: 1971 CB750 K1 Rider Resto

New to the forum, so just getting caught up on some of the projects. You're doing some great work. Thanks for the the detailed photos and descriptions! -Ray
 

edhaeuser

Been Around the Block
Re: 1971 CB750 K1 Rider Resto

one last short update before I get home from work in a couple of weeks. As you may recall, I had soaked some of my chrome pieces in vinegar for a few days. i ended up lightly cleaning the undersides of the fenders with a brass brush and the top side with 0000 steel wool for a final cleanup. the parts came out pretty nice.......considering what I started with.

here is the front fender, it came out nicer than the rear.

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And now I have a half of a roller......I'm waiting for the cash to order a new DID rim for the rear so I can actually roll this beast around :)

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Well, that is going to be it for a while

Ed
 

K4

Active Member
Re: 1971 CB750 K1 Rider Resto

Amazing work! Look forward to your progress.

Just a suggestion; take the front end off, put the engine on its side and slide the frame down and bolt it in place. My wife Deb helped me with mine. It went smoothly (no scratches and it was easier on my back). Good luck!
 

edhaeuser

Been Around the Block
Re: 1971 CB750 K1 Rider Resto

K4 said:
Amazing work! Look forward to your progress.

Just a suggestion; take the front end off, put the engine on its side and slide the frame down and bolt it in place. My wife Deb helped me with mine. It went smoothly (no scratches and it was easier on my back). Good luck!

Yes, I know that it is easier to put the engine in that way but I don't have the engine ready for install yet. I will have to see where I am at with the chassis when the engine is ready. Thanks for the tip!
 

edhaeuser

Been Around the Block
Re: 1971 CB750 K1 Rider Resto

Well, I had really hoped to just clean up and paint my engine and then run it for this summer and see how it goes. Alas, I really should tear it down and do it right, considering what I just found yesterday.

I bought the cheap Harbor Freight engine stand a while back. I finally got aound to fabricating some stand off mounts for the CB750 engine so that I would have easy access for cleaning and painting.

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The engine needed a really good cleaning for starters.

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Well, I knew there was a reasonable chance that I would find this problem as the sprocket cover had a hole in it from chain slap. I cleaned off the grease and found this fiberglass patch on the case. Sigh. I had hoped that I would escape this problem. So, I guess I will need to tear the engine down and do a complete rebuild as well as get a patch welded in the case.

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So.......more time and more money. Both of which are at a premium these days. I had hoped to get this thing on the road by the end of June. Who knows how long it will be now.
 

edhaeuser

Been Around the Block
Re: 1971 CB750 K1 Rider Resto

After judicious use of the Mapp torch, (i.e. lets start the motor on fire) it appears that the damage is just to the lower case. Now, to find a good lower case for a good price. Or repair mine? There is a local guy that has several spare engines of varying years. Does anyone know if the lower cases are the the same through the years?

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edhaeuser

Been Around the Block
Re: 1971 CB750 K1 Rider Resto

On a lighter note........ I saw this seat pan and foam for sale on Fleabay. I noticed that it was located 20 miles from me so I messaged the seller to see if I could pick it up and not pay the $25 dollar shipping. He had a buy it now of $80 so I snagged it. It is in very nice condition. The chrome trim pieces are perfect and the pan is nearly perfect. According to him, The seat cover was damaged by a shipper when he had the bike shipped. Apparently, It was a NOS seat on a fairly recent restoration. He had taken the seat to be re upholstered and then ended up just buying a new seat. I will get a nice seat cover from ebay and have a really nice seat for about $150.


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It still has the factory stamps on it

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swan

Kickstart, shift on right, drum brakes and spokes
DTT BOTM WINNER
Re: 1971 CB750 K1 Rider Resto

Ed, You cannot simply swap a lower motor case and hope it will match the upper. Each halve is mated and lined bored at the factory, so it is all or nothing. The other alternative is to do what I did on my CB750 K4 and have my welder Pat TIG weld a repair. Do it right the first time. There a two spare CB750 K motors at Winona Riders if need be.
 

edhaeuser

Been Around the Block
Re: 1971 CB750 K1 Rider Resto

swan said:
Ed, You cannot simply swap a lower motor case and hope it will match the upper. Each halve is mated and lined bored at the factory, so it is all or nothing. The other alternative is to do what I did on my CB750 K4 and have my welder Pat TIG weld a repair. Do it right the first time. There a two spare CB750 K motors at Winona Riders if need be.

Thanks Jon,

I know your welder probably gave you a deal, but do you have any idea what the welding and machining would cost?
 

swan

Kickstart, shift on right, drum brakes and spokes
DTT BOTM WINNER
Re: 1971 CB750 K1 Rider Resto

In the neighborhood of $25 for gas, welding rod and a twelve pack of Grain Belt for Pat's labor. I am serious.

PS just rode the Gold Star for the FIRST TIME!
 

edhaeuser

Been Around the Block
Re: 1971 CB750 K1 Rider Resto

swan said:
In the neighborhood of $25 for gas, welding rod and a twelve pack of Grain Belt for Pat's labor. I am serious.

PS just rode the Gold Star for the FIRST TIME!

It is good to have welder friends! I would be hoppy to bring beer :)
 

swan

Kickstart, shift on right, drum brakes and spokes
DTT BOTM WINNER
Re: 1971 CB750 K1 Rider Resto

Ed, the case half needs to clinically clean for him to weld it.
 

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