1994 Yamaha YZF750R - Vandal

Sonreir

Oregon
DTT SUPPORTER
OK... before diverging too far from stock I've decided to see what I can do about repairing the plastics. In the spirit of staying home and not buying anything, I'm using materials laying around the shop.

First layer is old screen material, soaked with epoxy. We'll let it set overnight and then build upon it as a base.
 

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SONICJK

Reminds me of...me No, I'm sure of it. I hate him
Hell "epoxy and a coat of paint makes me the glasser' I ain't "
Should work fine lol
 

canyoncarver

'hacking is learning'
DTT BOTM WINNER
OK... before diverging too far from stock I've decided to see what I can do about repairing the plastics. In the spirit of staying home and not buying anything, I'm using materials laying around the shop.

First layer is old screen material, soaked with epoxy. We'll let it set overnight and then build upon it as a base.
This is basically what I did to refurb my oem plastics. It's nice to have the original fairings even if they are patched back together on the backside.
 

teazer

Well-Known Member
DTT BOTM WINNER
I found it more effective to plastic weld parts. In the case of one FZR400 I repaired a few years ago, there were largish sections of complex curves missing, so I was able to get a pile of broken fairings from a local dealer and cut sections out that matched teh curvature and welded them in to replace the missing parts. With the luxury of cash, it would be simpler to replace the bodywork but that isn't always an option.
 

canyoncarver

'hacking is learning'
DTT BOTM WINNER
I found it more effective to plastic weld parts. In the case of one FZR400 I repaired a few years ago, there were largish sections of complex curves missing, so I was able to get a pile of broken fairings from a local dealer and cut sections out that matched teh curvature and welded them in to replace the missing parts. With the luxury of cash, it would be simpler to replace the bodywork but that isn't always an option.
I evaluated plastic welding for mine too. The main issue that pushed me to epoxy/glass the repair were the oem decals for this bike and color scheme are basically unobtanium. I practiced plastic welding on some old abs fairing but you have to work both sides and that means losing the oem decals. The plastic welding did work really well though and the end result is lighter than adding resin.
 

teazer

Well-Known Member
DTT BOTM WINNER
Good point about the decals. For my project that wasn't an issue plus I had parts in many different colors. Jacob would have been jealous
 

Sonreir

Oregon
DTT SUPPORTER
I was getting ready to lay down some more fiberglass today when I suddenly realized I had a really good supply of ABS. We go through a few thousand feet of wire each month and have tons of these plastic spools laying around. I broke of a couple of them, cut them down to size, then got to work with an old soldering iron I didn't need anymore. A couple of hours later, I sealed it all in with some ABS cement. We'll see how it goes.
 

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Sonreir

Oregon
DTT SUPPORTER
Noticed another crack in the front fairing this morning, so I drilled a couple of holes to relieve the stress then welded it up. I followed that up by smoothing things down with some 320 grit. The sanding revealed that I didn't get very good penetration (visible on the left in pic ending 344) on some of the seams, so I went back a second time and then laid down a fairly thick coat of medium body filler.
 

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Last edited:

irk miller

You've been mostly-dead all day.
DTT BOTM WINNER
So, basically what you're about to post is that you just ordered carbon fiber fairings from the Czech Republic.
 

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