Brodie's XV1100

Maritime

Over 10,000 Posts
My experience was hell. replaced 3 cams before the one I was helping a buddy with stopped eating them. I don't ever want to work on another LOL.
 

Brodie

Gold Coast, Queensland
DTT SUPPORTER
The 1100 is a special kind of stupid with its reserve tank system. Still not sure I have that working right.

Not much progress but I put the centre stand spring on today. Used the old washer trick but still managed to punch the floor and bust a knuckle. My luck with fingers isn't good.
 

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Rider52

Over 1,000 Posts
The 1100 is a special kind of stupid with its reserve tank system. Still not sure I have that working right.

Not much progress but I put the centre stand spring on today. Used the old washer trick but still managed to punch the floor and bust a knuckle. My luck with fingers isn't good.
I have grown to hate those springs!
 

pidjones

Over 1,000 Posts
I've only done it on a CB750F, a couple GL1000s, and an RD400c but putting them in with the stand extending the spring to the max before you take it off has made the spring almost fall off for me. I use pennies and press them in on a spiral with slip joint pliers to keep the spring straight.
WP_20181114_13_34_18_Pro.jpg
 

Brodie

Gold Coast, Queensland
DTT SUPPORTER
After clearing out some of the furniture that was being stored in the workshop I now have a lot more room to work on my projects.
As such I was able to drag this old heap out and continue with the front end.
6 months later and I had a different idea for the bike.
As I stated earlier I this bike feels to me that is it a small cruiser trying to be a big cruiser. With all the 1800cc cruisers around now I think I should treat this as a small cruiser.
After riding a friend's new Harley FXLR inspiration hit to get this thing going again.
But this time I think a narrow look will be the go.

Here is a quick change I made to the front end this morning.
IMG20210911112325.jpg
 

Brodie

Gold Coast, Queensland
DTT SUPPORTER
Finished with the front end aside from the mirrors and cable routing.
I cut 15mm of each side of the bars to reduce the overall width to allow me to lane filter easier.
Also cut about 15mm off each foot peg for the same reason.
Changed up the forward control mounting as well and put them on the inside of the plates I had welded on.
IMG20210917171732.jpg
 

Brodie

Gold Coast, Queensland
DTT SUPPORTER
Slowly digging through the wiring and making sure all connections are good. I found one suspect crimp that only had about 7 strands of wire left in it. Hopefully all the little things I am finding add up to a decent running bike.

Also still deciding on what to do about the exhaust.
I can buy a 2-2 system for $380 but need to move the fuel pump. Or I can buy some tubing and weld my own system.
Leaning toward the latter.
 

Brodie

Gold Coast, Queensland
DTT SUPPORTER
Just clean out the carbs and put a new set of jets in along with a 2.0 needle and seat. Down from the 3.5 that were in there stock. Mikuni Oz has said that this should help with the overflow issue that happens on the 1100 due to the fuel pump.

Haven't had a chance to test that with the pump but I primed the carbs with a prime bulb used from a boat and fired her up.

After a bit of tinkering due to the rear cylinder not firing I realised I had fitted the float arm upside down.

Once that was sorted she fired right up and ran well. I pumped the primer bulb quite hard with only the left hand carb overflowing now. May just be the float height.

Once I get an exhaust sorted I will be able to take her for a burn and see what else needs to be done.
 

Brodie

Gold Coast, Queensland
DTT SUPPORTER
Decided to tackle the cam bearing upgrade today. After reading through a previous post by TJ on the matter I thought it seems like an easy enough job for the piece of mind.

First thing first for anyone that wants to do this.

Skills needed I would class as moderate. 2/5

Bearings needed are: 2x 6205-c3

Tools needed are:
1 permanent marker.
22mm socket.
17mm socket.
12mm socket.
1 breaker bar.
1 torque wrench.
5mm Allen key.
Bearing puller.
1 bare electrical blade terminal.
1 very clean rag.
Short length of rope.

To begin with read the manual on how to set the cylinders to top dead centre. Remove both cam covers.
Decide on which cylinder to do first and set it to TDC. I chose the rear.

Start by putting the rag under the cam gear to avoid anything dropping into the cylinder cases.
IMG20211008155107.jpg

Wipe oil off the cam chain and use the marker to mark the chain link that lines up with TDC on the gear.

Then put the bike in 5th and push down hard on the rear brake.
Remove the cam gear bolt using a 17mm socket.
IMG20211008172205.jpg

Then use the 5mm Allen key to remove the bolts for the cam chain tensioner and remove the tensioner.
IMG20211008155111.jpg

Next remove the cam gear and use the rope to tie the chain up to avoid it dropping into the engine.
Then use the 12mm socket to remove the came bearing retainer.
IMG20211008155852.jpg

Once the retainer is remove use the bearing puller, or a plate with a hole in it, across the face of the cam cover and remove the cam and plain bearing.
IMG20211008160543.jpg

Once removed swap the plain bearing out for the 6205-c3 bearing.
IMG20211008163937.jpg

Give both surfaces of the bearing a good wipe with oil and reinstall the cam with the pin facing towards the timing mark.
IMG20211008164804.jpg

After that reinstall the bearing retainer and set torque to the correct figure as per the manual. Loosely install the cam gear onto cam ensuring the cam gear is aligned with the pre-marked chain link. This will make sure the timing is still correct.
IMG20211008170748.jpg

The reset the preload of the tensioner by winding the screw at the head while pushing the tensioner in. You will need to slot the blade terminal in once you have reset the tension to prevent it from moving.
IMG20211008170754.jpg

Reinstall the tensioner and remove the blade terminal to set tension.

Follow the same instructions for the other side.

BEFORE STARTING!
Rotate the engine over a few times using the same socket to set the timing to ensure that there is no contact between the valves and the pistons.

Reinstall the cam covers and job done.
 

ridesolo

Comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable.
DTT SUPPORTER
DTT BOTM WINNER
I'm sure I'll never own one of these, but I appreciate the way you've done your instructions; nice job!
 

Brodie

Gold Coast, Queensland
DTT SUPPORTER
Woohoo! Got the carbs and fuel pump sorted out finally.

Looks like by attempting to omit the low fuel light I had confused the fuel pump controller. Reconnecting the two wires for the light brought the pump back into life.

Then I had a look at the carbs. The floats weren't closing when the fuel pump was on. So off they came again and I reset the float levels.
Worked perfect and the pump now shut off when the carbs are full instead of leaking over the whole engine and dripping onto my floor.
 

Aleczanda

New Member
Woohoo! Got the carbs and fuel pump sorted out finally.

Looks like by attempting to omit the low fuel light I had confused the fuel pump controller. Reconnecting the two wires for the light brought the pump back into life.

Then I had a look at the carbs. The floats weren't closing when the fuel pump was on. So off they came again and I reset the float levels.
Worked perfect and the pump now shut off when the carbs are full instead of leaking over the whole engine and dripping onto my floor.

Awesome write ups, done anything recently with the bike?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Brodie

Gold Coast, Queensland
DTT SUPPORTER
Nothing recently.
Been working 55+ hours a week at work again so haven't had much of a chance.
 

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