Dickies Moto Jeans

SONICJK

Reminds me of...me No, I'm sure of it. I hate him
They look pretty slim on the bottom, fashionable but not going over any boots
 

Maritime

Well-Known Member
They look better than regular jeans but not as good as real riding jeans with armour and kevlar etc.
 

Maritime

Well-Known Member
That being said for $80 might be worth trying a pair, but I'd have to find a store and try them on. Online ordering pants without trying them leads to disaster for me.
 

teazer

Well-Known Member
DTT BOTM WINNER
The best jeans are probably Draggin Jeans at around $160.

Joe Rocket sells a similar kevlar lined product for about $90, and there are others for even less. Not sure that I'd spend 80 bucks on denim without kevlar, but it's a personal thing. I have a pair of Draggin Jeans I imported years ago and they are easy to wear but a touch stiffer than regular thin denim jeans, but as long as I'm not planning on doing a lot of walking between rides, that's not much of an issue.
 

ridesolo

You only bear responsibility for your own actions
When I saw this thread start up I wondered how long it would take before Kevlar was mentioned. Many years ago when kevlar became commercially available I remember reading a very thorough test article published in one of the motorcycling magazines. They spent a bunch of time doing very careful comparison tests on gloves, jackets, and pants made of ballistic, leather, denim, and materials w/ kevlar included. Through it all they tried to be very consistent, thorough, and scientific in their testing. What they determined is that through test after test Kevlar is very good at doing what it's designed to do; prevent puncture. What it's not good at is dealing w/ abrasion. Kevlar didn't offer any protection from falls and sliding and sometimes offered less protecton than ballistic, leather, and even denim. Their bottom line was that inless you are concerned about getting shot while riding don't bother with Kevlar.

I've had several opportunities to buy kevlar lined gloves and pants and, based on that article, I decided to pass. Please don't misunderstand, I'm not criticizing any product or anyone who uses and likes their Kevlar products, I'm just passing on what I read.
 
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AgentX

Well-Known Member


Take a propogander...


I'm happy owner of some Ikon titanium "jeans" which are really just modern textile riding pants (accordion stretch sections, armor, and all) with denim-looking cues around the black material in the accordion and stretch sections. Love them for dedicated riding us but something more day-to-day would be a nice add, too...
 

AgentX

Well-Known Member
Also w ref to Kevlar:

https://www.aerostich.com/media/oldsite/sec3.html


THE STRAIGHT STORY ON KEVLAR
or Kevlar vs. Real-World Abrasions

Aero Design pioneered abrasion resistant motorcycle riders suits made of advanced technology fabrics. We continue to be the world leader in this field so we're often asked why we choose Cordura nylon, Ballistic Nylon, and Gore Tex laminates for our Roadcrafter and Darien garments. Why not Kevlar?
We'd heard good things about Kevlar's qualities when we started our work, but back then Kevlar simply wasn't available in a useable form, so we chose the most effective materials available. Our rigorous original testing and subsequent experience (as well as our customers') has shown Cordura Nylon's abrasion resistance is not merely sufficient, but it has far surpassed riders' needs and expectations.* We've examined and repaired hundreds of crashed suits, some tested at over 100 mph. Visit our shop sometime and we'll show you actual crash tested suits and our abrasion testing materials and apparatus. Today Kevlar, manufactured in a useable form only by Schoeller Textile Company in Switzerland, and used by other makers of protective riders clothing, is readily available.

We still choose Cordura, not Kevlar. Here's why:
Its advantages don't make up for it's disadvantages. In pure, undiluted form, Kevlar is lighter than Nylon and has greater tensile strength than Nylon. It won't melt like Nylon after touching a hot muffler (or from the friction generated heat of a high speed slide on hot pavement). Unfortunately, it's expensive and difficult to work with, which limits design and construction possibilities. Believe it or not, pure Kevlar fabric actually is much less abrasion resistant than Cordura Nylon. This quality is not important for bulletproof vests. Kevlar fibers have far less elasticity than Cordura Nylon fibers, a crucial handicap. In a crash, even the smoothest pavements have a rough aggregate surface that causes abrasive pulling. Nylon's stretchy fibers will elongate, ride over the surface irregularities, then snap back into the weave (like a tree bending in a strong wind), but Kevlar fibers quickly reach their tensile limit and snap.

To solve these problems, manufacturers blend Kevlar with Lycra and Nylon. In this blend, "Kevlar" is only about one third actual Kevlar. This creates problems: because of the additional Nylon and Lycra, much of its slight weight advantage over Cordura is lost. It also loses its fire-retardant qualities. The blended Kevlar fabric will burn or melt (just like Nylon) when it comes in contact with a flame, hot component, or high frictional heat.

Some Kevlar suits may provide good crash performance because they are specifically designed for competitive roadracing. Roadcrafter suits aren't designed for sanctioned roadracing, but fortunately theyOre designed for everything else, including abrasion resistance at highway speeds. We've tested (and will continue to test) Cordura nylon against the alternatives. Its superior comfort, easy workability and excellent abrasion resistance make it our choice for quality, versatile, high performance rider's clothing. You've got a choice between the Roadcrafter and its proven record of outstanding abrasion performance, and something that costs more and delivers less. Guess what we recommend.

* For detailed information on leather vs. nylon vs. Kevlar, see the September 1989 issue of Cycle. In this cover story, the editors duplicated the Aero Design tests developed for the first Roadcrafter suits. The April 1993 issue of Motorcyclist also has a feature on comparative abrasion resistance of various materials.
 

Maritime

Well-Known Member
Hmm. that's interesting. So now I'm more interested in checking out the Dickies, only issue is the slimmer fit for my legs. I need relaxed fit to get past my thighs.
 

ridesolo

You only bear responsibility for your own actions
Thanx, @AgentX! I knew I had read that Cycle report back in the '80s but couldn't remember where it was from and when.
 

Tim

Administrator
Staff member
I'll pop down to Town Moto and try some on later today maybe. Too bad they only come in black.

I'm looking for something other than jeans / full on Olympia waterproof pants to ride in, but wouldn't mind something other than black.
 

teazer

Well-Known Member
DTT BOTM WINNER
Aerostich use mainly Ballistic nylon and not cotton, wo that's really an apples to apples comparison and kevlar has a very high abrasion resistance


I see other people on line saying that kevlar has low abrasion resistance but few tests to support that. One big advantage over nylon is its heat resistance - it does not melt and stick to the skin. That's a biggie. Likewise, cotton also doesn't melt but it has lower abrasion resistance than kevlar.

As to what others choose to wear, I have no reason to question their choices. It's up to you. Most of my short trips to the coffee shop are wearing regular jeans because I know I'm such a good rider that I don't need protection. Yeah right........

Just don't wear safety shorts and Crocs like a buddy of mine who spend months healing bones and ground beef and that was at about 20 mph.

Whatever you choose to wear, be careful and ride safe.
 

AgentX

Well-Known Member
(Also note my re-post of Aerostitch's informational stuff was not me endorsing it, just throwing in something from one source...I'm certainly not claiming any expertise!)

Like Teazer, I ride in jeans or cargo pants a lot around town. I know it's not the safest but I also ride bicycles at some pretty fast speeds wearing cycling shorts, so I know I'm taking risk... I would enjoy having a pair of pants that look and function normally but provide me some additional abrasion resistance, even if not as much as a full riding pant, hence my interest in these.

Guessing they'll be impractical or "off" in some respect, whether tailoring or feel or appearance or comfort...though free lunches exist, they're rare. Usually you've gotta give something to get something.
 

Tim

Administrator
Staff member
I did a high side at about 30mph in my jeans and Alpinestars mesh jacket, and Icon gloves. Thankfully I was also wearing proper boots.

Left arm took the brunt of it along with my helmet. Jeans were fine and my ankle was protected.
Bruised from my rib cage to my knee on the left side but I walked away from it.

I should wear armoured pants but I don’t often.
4962DBF7-68F1-4D16-92F9-2CC568C92140.jpeg
492F315E-4B0C-4AFB-9B58-83E82DF59A26.jpeg
 
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