Found a $300 CB550

My seat got delivered today. I thought it was a British company but it actually was from Greece. It's a nice piece. I've bought a lot of motorcycle stuff from Europe and it's always been successful. I think I've officially moved on from a cafe racer build to a tracker.
 

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I think I've officially moved on from a cafe racer build to a tracker.
I completely understand what you are saying. If I had gone the tracker route on my CL360 (378) there's a good chance I'd still own it. I liked my final result but it was a bit of a fold for someone my age. Somewhere along the way there was a little voice within me saying "go tracker" and I didn't listen.
 
There is a lot of good reasons for tracker style bikes.
I was a little embarrassed to stop working on this project but I did have some big home projects that I had to prioritize. I've been on other forums and some are good and some suck. This one is turning out to be very cool. A lot of interaction and support and a lot of very knowledgeable people.

My every day bike is a 2019 MT10 which I've done aftermarket suspension on and is the motorcycle love of my life. I've always leaned towards these type of motorcycles. I owned motocross bikes until I was almost 40. When I was a kid I liked British bikes and had a clapped out BSA 350 and trying to keep that running left me to admire British bikes from afar. I was never a Harley guy but I was gag over the XR750 flat tracker when it came out. I always had an idea of building one for the street but they just seemed to be so far away from the performance I want out of a motorcycle. This Honda was started as a cafe racer and I always thought they were cool so I figured I'd go with that. The poor quality of the workmanship from the original owner made it easy for me to switch over to my original admiration of flat track style.
 
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3 Saturdays and 2 Sundays of work to get the rear hub sanded and polished. Most of the cafe racer builds I see have the hubs painted black. If I was willing to paint it black I could have finished it in a couple of hours. I still have to do the plate with the brake in it but it's just 1 surface so not an ordeal like the hub. I have new aluminum rims, bearings, sprocket and brake shoes. About $200 worth of parts to build the rear wheel.
I didn't take a picture of it in the original condition but a couple of progress pictures and finished one.
 

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You did a nice job on the hub. How well did the special tool work? Did you get it from Carpy? I've been looking at it as a single item replacement for multiple tools. I suspect the average wheel (spokes, bearings, rim, tire/tube and lacing/truing (If the owner can't do it) costs about $400 each wheel. Added fasteners, sprockets and other bits will push the price higher. Polishing, paint, powder adds more cost and time.
 
You did a nice job on the hub. How well did the special tool work? Did you get it from Carpy? I've been looking at it as a single item replacement for multiple tools. I suspect the average wheel (spokes, bearings, rim, tire/tube and lacing/truing (If the owner can't do it) costs about $400 each wheel. Added fasteners, sprockets and other bits will push the price higher. Polishing, paint, powder adds more cost and time.
Thanks. The special tool worked well after I struggled for an hour with no success. THEN, I decided to look at the shop manual to see if it was a left hand thread. It makes it a lot easier. I got it from common Motor. Carpy is a cool guy but IMO his shipping costs are insane. I'm not paying anyone except for the powder coat, paint, and a friend who is a welding artisan.
 
After 3 weekends, I got the brake plate polished and am done with the rear hub. It sure is a lot of work polishing out aluminum parts. Some how I lost the new wheel bearings and had to buy another new set. The brake shoes & sprocket are new. They came in and I also bought a truing stand. I've been working on motorcycles since I was a kid and I guess it's time to learn how to true wheels.
 

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I put a preservative finish on the wheels, hub & spokes. I installed the new wheel bearings and laced up the wheel. I have to say that the time spent polishing the hub now seems worth it. I bought a truing stand and now have to teach myself how to true a wheel. It looks pretty cool to me. It's ironic, 6 days to polish out the hub, 1 half day to do bearings and lace up the wheel. It's satisfying to start putting this together.
 
So tonight after work, I put the wheel on the truing stand and watched some YouTube videos and I actually figured it out and trued my first wheel. It was very satisfying as I originally planned on paying someone to do it.
 

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I love building wheels, easier than most think. Nice work.
 
I'm finishing up the rear wheel and starting the front. I'm wondering about those tongued washers on the rear sprocket. What is the point of them? Are they some kind of lock washer. Can I put flat washers on with some thread locker?
 
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