Honda RS1000 - CB400F Mini Replica

Luugo86

'73 CB350, '78 XS650 Cafe Killer
I would say you have more tools and machines than 90% of ppl on this site. Nice metal work.
 

Rick4004

New Member
And, I wanted the indentation on the side of thank for the quick fill, even though I wasn't going to use it. I make up a set of dies from some particle board that I had lying around, and stuck it all in the press.
I had to flatten out (stretch) the material around the perimeter of the panel after dimpling, but all in all it went pretty well. Dies like this are not very strong (I had to anneal the area of the panel that got dimpled) but they only took an hour to make, and you could probably use them a few more times before they gave up the ghost.
 

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Rick4004

New Member
I've been going back and forth on where to locate the battery. The RCB's located the battery in the typical location under the seat, but I've always loved the look of them located in the tail section. This was typically done when running a total loss electrical system where the alternator is removed, and the battery is changed at every pit stop/rider change.
I am probably going to sell this bike after it's finished, so I'm worried that the battery in the tail section might be too out in left field for some potential buyers.

Thoughts?
 

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irk miller

You've been mostly-dead all day.
DTT BOTM WINNER
I love it so far. IMO, any battery location should be a reasonably easy access. If the tail section provides that, I don't see it being too far out. I assume we're talking LiFePO4, so there's not a concern to have weight above COG.
 

Pete12

Member
Hey Rick, what make of 3d printer did you buy, I'm looking at getting one myself.
Nice work on the bike too, very impressive.
 

Rick4004

New Member
Pete12 - I bought a Creality CR10. The build size is 12" x 12" x 16"H. Since I bought mine 2 years ago they have done some upgrades, the best one being a filament sensor that stops the print if you run out of filament, and then allows you to start again when you load a new roll. Mine doesn't have that and that's the only negative comment that I would make about the printer. You end up with rolls of filament with just a little bit left on them.
 

teazer

Active Member
DTT BOTM WINNER
How about putting the battery under the seat hump to keep the clean look. Batteries don't need a lot of access for maintenance as long as they are kept charged. Add a Battery Tender connection to keep it charged. You could also add a door to the top of the seat for access if you were feeling trick.
 

Rick4004

New Member
Teazer - I might just put the battery under the seat as you suggest. If I was keeping the bike for myself, I would have it come out the top of the seat, it's a classic endurance race design that I love, but maybe the cleaner look would be easier for resale.
 

Popeye SXM

Also used for MX
I am really enjoying this project, great work. For me a clean look is best for resale, most people will not be thinking of how to change the battery when they first see the bike
 

Rick4004

New Member
Finally got some time to work on this project again. I got the tank pieces fitted and ready to be tacked together. (hopefully this week). And, my fuel filler arrived! I had a choice if this 80mm one or a larger 105mm one. I picked the small one, but now I wish I had picked the larger one. Oh well.

This is what a days work will get you. I started this morning digging up material, did all the programming, and milling, lathe work, tapping holes, and was done by about 3pm.

The front will get one of those one way vent valve thingies.
 

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Rick4004

New Member
Finally got back to doing some more work on this project. I built a painting stand to paint the wheels. The stand makes it really easy to spin the wheel and get even paint coverage. Much easier than hanging them.
The yellow is an aluminum primer.
 

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Rick4004

New Member
Someone commented that I had way more equipment than the average builder, so I decided to make this rear caliper bracket by hand. (Well, truth be told I did use a drill press and a band saw. But, as a youngster, I made lots of parts like this with a hacksaw, angle grinder, and hand drill.
With some patience you can get pretty close to CNC quality just cutting it within 1/32"-1/16" and hand filing the rest of the way.
If you look back to the first picture of the rear wheel you will notice a HUGE rear disk that came on the GS500. The RG250 had the same bolt spacings, so I ordered a rear disk from that bike. Much smaller and lighter.
 

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Rick4004

New Member
I thought I'd take a shot of the tank template that I made before I threw it out. If you can make it out of cardboard, it will be easier to make in aluminum. If you can't make it in cardboard without creasing or tearing the cardboard, then that means you are going to have to stretch/shrink the aluminum in those areas.
 

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Rick4004

New Member
I am going to try to make RCB half fairing from aluminum. I needed a windshield to start from so I didn't have to try to make something fit afterwards. I was going to use one from an NS400 since I have an NS windshield and fairing mounted on another bike, and I was going to use that as a starting point. Until I priced out an NS400 windshield. $190USD from Gastaffson windscreens. With shipping thats around $275 CDN. Too much for this cheap ass Scottsman.

I had seen these little quarter fairings all over the internet, especially on Alliexpress for $35-$40USD, and there was one available on Amazon.ca for $60 CDN with shipping. I figured for that much I'd order one and if I didn't use the windshield for this project, I'd use the whole fairing on some other project.

I was pretty happy with the quality for $60. The main body as ABS or polycarbonate, and it is smooth and well finished. The windshield looks like an injected molded acrylic or something. I think I can use it as the basis for my half fairing.
 

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