Texas Two Step Taco

Texasstar

Can't is a four letter dirty word
For water. For gasoline it's even less, only about .34psi.
BB just texted me and said I wouldn’t be pulling that many G’s....that hurts. Lol. He said he had always heard the tank needed to be in front of the carbs. Unless you have a fuel pump. However I did see a bunch of the Indonesian drag bikes with the fuel cell on the tail.


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teazer

Over 1,000 Posts
DTT BOTM WINNER
that tank on the bars looks right. High and tight as they say.

And check out the pipe on that thing. o_O:)
 

John Murray

Been Around the Block
BB just texted me and said I wouldn’t be pulling that many G’s....that hurts


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And he's right of course. But even half a G with the tank mounted so low behind the carb would be enough to reduce the flow to virtually nothing. When you check the fuel flow remember to measure what comes out of the drain hole of the float bowl, not what comes out of the hose. You need to measure whats actually available to the mainjet.
 

Texasstar

Can't is a four letter dirty word
Drum roll please...the Bultaco rear wheel weighs 21 lbs
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Took the taco rear wheel and tire to the shop to have the slick removed and get an accurate weight. The M and H racemaster slick only weighs 12 lbs. The tube is 1.6 lbs.


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Texasstar

Can't is a four letter dirty word
So the xr650l rear wheel that Juan Verde gave me is winner. It only weighed 13 lbs with a heavy rotor and steel sprocket. The sprocket, rotor, and hardware is 4 lbs.
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Texasstar

Can't is a four letter dirty word
Looks like we are staying 520 chain for now. John Green or as we affectionately call him Juan Verde donated an xr650l rear wheel to our project. This wheel gives us the correct offset and puts the tire back on the centerline of the front tire.

Racetech had some titanium sprocket bolts on sale so they are on there way. We are making a conversion from 10mm bolts of the xr650l to what the xr650r had which is 8mm bolts because we can get a cheaper and better selection of aluminum sprockets. Just going to sleeve the 10mm hub holes. The flange of the 8mm nut looks like it will cover no problem. If not I have a bunch of 8mm x 30mm 1.25 pitch titanium nuts and bolts. Lol. I can always sell them on eBay. Now to work on the brake rotor and bolts.


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Texasstar

Can't is a four letter dirty word
View attachment 228591
“If it’s high move it lower, if it’s low move it forward. If it’s high and cannot move down, make anything that spins lighter.” Martin Windmill. This is the lightest brake rotor could find for the xr650l.
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Sent from my iPhone using TapatalkView attachment 228592
 
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Texasstar

Can't is a four letter dirty word
Is there any reason why we can’t go to an aluminum spacer in our rear wheel? This weighs a 1/2 lbs.
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Texasstar

Can't is a four letter dirty word
If you are replacing the bearings on a XR650L...Well don’t try and remove the bearing retainer on a XR650l without first drilling out the peening. Had to order a new bearing retainer.
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teazer

Over 1,000 Posts
DTT BOTM WINNER
Is there any reason why we can’t go to an aluminum spacer in our rear wheel? This weighs a 1/2 lbs.
No. As in there is no reason not to. Double bloody negatives....

If you have a lathe and raw material it's a good idea. Add a couple of thou to the legth to allow for greater crush on an aluminum tube, and flange the ends to say 4mm larger diameter for say 3mm to allow it to center properly and you should be good to go. It doesn't need to be high strength or anodized. Use easy machining grade AL.

Or cross drill the steel spacer. You won't save as much weight and it's hard to deburr the inside of the holes, but it's cheap.

You can also cross drill the rear disk. I don't mean those tiny little gas reducing little holes. Cross drill with say 25mm holes on a mill. Rear brakes don't do much. Think of it as an emergency brake and as long as it's as good as putting your feet down, you are good. OK so that was a little tongue in cheek, but you don't need a lot of metal in a rear disk to be operational.

Add lightness.
 

pidjones

Over 1,000 Posts
Drill out the stakes on any (Honda uses them, too) retainer before removing. A new retainer can be ordered, but screwed-up wheel internal threads take a lot of work to correct.
 

Texasstar

Can't is a four letter dirty word
No. As in there is no reason not to. Double bloody negatives....

If you have a lathe and raw material it's a good idea. Add a couple of thou to the legth to allow for greater crush on an aluminum tube, and flange the ends to say 4mm larger diameter for say 3mm to allow it to center properly and you should be good to go. It doesn't need to be high strength or anodized. Use easy machining grade AL.

Or cross drill the steel spacer. You won't save as much weight and it's hard to deburr the inside of the holes, but it's cheap.

You can also cross drill the rear disk. I don't mean those tiny little gas reducing little holes. Cross drill with say 25mm holes on a mill. Rear brakes don't do much. Think of it as an emergency brake and as long as it's as good as putting your feet down, you are good. OK so that was a little tongue in cheek, but you don't need a lot of metal in a rear disk to be operational.

Add lightness.
Your humor kills me...your lightness of being. BB says brakes are there for appearances. The fun is to see if you can coast back to the trailer.


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Texasstar

Can't is a four letter dirty word
Drill out the stakes on any (Honda uses them, too) retainer before removing. A new retainer can be ordered, but screwed-up wheel internal threads take a lot of work to correct.
Sounds like you got to repair a few. Thank you.


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Texasstar

Can't is a four letter dirty word
No. As in there is no reason not to. Double bloody negatives....

If you have a lathe and raw material it's a good idea. Add a couple of thou to the legth to allow for greater crush on an aluminum tube, and flange the ends to say 4mm larger diameter for say 3mm to allow it to center properly and you should be good to go. It doesn't need to be high strength or anodized. Use easy machining grade AL.

Or cross drill the steel spacer. You won't save as much weight and it's hard to deburr the inside of the holes, but it's cheap.

You can also cross drill the rear disk. I don't mean those tiny little gas reducing little holes. Cross drill with say 25mm holes on a mill. Rear brakes don't do much. Think of it as an emergency brake and as long as it's as good as putting your feet down, you are good. OK so that was a little tongue in cheek, but you don't need a lot of metal in a rear disk to be operational.

Add lightness.
Could do the flanges because the internal ID would let me but we have 2/3 weight reduction with the new aluminium spacer
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