1968 CL175 repair and build

Finally got those bolts out, and got the covers off. I've got the stator side of the crank loose, but I can't seem to find a way to pop the other side off. I removed the clutch plates and all that stuff and I'm down to the retaining ring on the clutch itself. Do I need to take off the whole basket? Is there a bolt hidden back there somewhere?

Also I'm assuming that the smaller rotating thing on the clutch gear is the oil filter, looks like the screw there is stripped too so I'm gonna have to drill that out. Pics soon I promise!

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Edit: Also, after hammering the shit out of the top of the piston that's frozen I got exactly nowhere, so I'm thinking that since I have new cylinders I might just drill out the pin in the piston and pop it off that way, that's my best plan so far so please suggest something better haha.
 

teazer

Active Member
DTT BOTM WINNER
The oil filter is attached to the end of the crankshaft and should be removed for cleaning and to get the gears off that are behind it.

Then you need to remove the clutch hum and basket and to get that off, you also have to remove the oil pump. The pump is actuated by a flat "con rod" on teh back of the clutch basket and the basket and pump have to be wiggled off together.

There is a special tool to remove the oil slinger (centrifugal filter). First you have to remove the end cap and clip and then you will see the castellated nut which has a tab washer in one of the slots. Bend that out of the way and either grind a socket to fit the slots or buy the toll on ebay - they are cheap. It would be helpful to those of us not in your shop to see pictures of the things that are problems/questions. That was we can be sure we're talking about the same parts that you are asking about.
 

K4

New Member
This might help with photos. It's on a '71 CB175.

http://www.hondatwins.net/forums/1-project-logs/17231-1971-cb175-k5-restoration.html
 
K4 said:
This might help with photos. It's on a '71 CB175.

http://www.hondatwins.net/forums/1-project-logs/17231-1971-cb175-k5-restoration.html
Dang this is perfect, thanks!

In other news, pictures.

First one is after I finally got the jugs off and confirmed that the rings had slid off the piston and jammed between them and the cylinder. I drilled straight through the overhang on the cylinder wall and tapped the pin out because that was the only way I could think of. I feel bad about it, but it worked.

Next one is taking off the oil cup, had to drill the head off and wiggle the cap out, but it's free.

The third picture is just the other side of the motor with the timing marks. I got the bolt in the end off shortly after, so I'm gonna pick up the bolt to thread in there and pop it off.

The last one is the clutch side. Is there a bolt in here somewhere that is still holding the case together? I took off everything on the bottom and every single thing I could find that'll keep them together but I just can't seem to split the cases. The left side is split, but the clutch side won't come apart.

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teazer

Active Member
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Couple of suggestions.

Alternator rotor: Remove the center bolts and screw in the rear axle until it bottoms against the crank and then tighten it some more. Then strike teh end of the axle sharply and the rotor should pop off. Also remove the sprocket and circlip .

Clutch side: remove the nut inside the oil slinger, then remove the slinger and the first gear behind it. Then undo the two oil pump nuts (they have tab washers) and slide the clutch and oil pump off together.

Then remove the shift shaft and carefully lift it off the shift drum.
Smack the clutch shaft lightly straight down and straight up with a rubber mallet (do not use a metal hammer) and the two case halves should crack open.

Later 175/200 motors have an extra hidden bolt hiding inside the sump plate but early sloper motors do not.
 
teazer said:
Couple of suggestions.

Alternator rotor: Remove the center bolts and screw in the rear axle until it bottoms against the crank and then tighten it some more. Then strike teh end of the axle sharply and the rotor should pop off. Also remove the sprocket and circlip .

Clutch side: remove the nut inside the oil slinger, then remove the slinger and the first gear behind it. Then undo the two oil pump nuts (they have tab washers) and slide the clutch and oil pump off together.

Then remove the shift shaft and carefully lift it off the shift drum.
Smack the clutch shaft lightly straight down and straight up with a rubber mallet (do not use a metal hammer) and the two case halves should crack open.

Later 175/200 motors have an extra hidden bolt hiding inside the sump plate but early sloper motors do not.
Thanks!
I guess the question is, as you confirmed I don't have any secret bolts, do I need to actually remove the alternator rotor? My new crankshaft already has one attached. I'm assuming I'll have to pop the clutch basket and the oil slinger off and I'm waiting for the little wrench for that castle nut to come in the mail. Now that I have the jugs off, once I get the case open I'm going to have to take everything out of them so I can clean them out, but I can just skip the alternator rotor step right?

I'm gonna have to pinstripe your name on this bike somewhere haha, thanks dude.

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teazer

Active Member
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IS there an oil seal behind that alternator and how will you replace it on the crank you plan on using? Just looking ahead a couple of steps.
 
teazer said:
IS there an oil seal behind that alternator and how will you replace it on the crank you plan on using? Just looking ahead a couple of steps.
It looks like I can use my original crankshaft after all, so this one will hopefully go to a good home.
On the other side of the engine, the oil slinger thing is really on there so I'm gonna need a really big breaker bar or something since I don't have any air tools here. The case is split everywhere but behind the oil slinger and clutch basket so maybe there's something back there holding me up.

I'm frustrated haha, I know that if I could split the case and clean it I'd have it back together in a couple hours so this thing is driving me nuts.

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teazer

Active Member
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Did you pry back the tab of that lock washer in the slots in the castle nut? After that, take the tool plus a short extension plus a short bar and smack it with a rubber mallet. One quick blow should get it free.

Then thread an 8mm (IIRC) bolt into the center of the slinger to pry it off the crank.

Then remove one primary drive gear

Then remove the clutch basket plus oil pump (two nuts plus tab washer)

Then the two halves should split. Sometimes you have to strike the crank upwards with a rubber mallet but take care and do not use a metal hammer.
 

teazer

Active Member
DTT BOTM WINNER
Pry both circlips out of the piston. Heat piston with a propane/MAP/butane torch or with a heat gun or hair dryer or wrap it in hot towels and then gently knock the pin out with a suitable long (deep) socket as you support the piston from the other side.
 
I didn't think to use a heat gun, but I did hammer the guts out of it with a socket extension for a while and it's getting there.

Looking ahead, is there a certain position I need to have the gears in when I reinstall them?

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teazer

Active Member
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Not really. The shafts just drop into the top half case. Make sure it's in neutral and that all the gears spin.
 
Alright, after half a can of PB Blaster, a heat gun, a potentially broken knuckle, and the sacrifice of a small socket extension, the piston is finally off! I've cleaned up the inside of the cases and cleaned everything inside them, so once I've gone to the hardware store and replaced everything with Grade 8 stuff or hex bolts, I'll be ready to put it all back together.

Couple questions though.. In the pictures I've pointed out holes for what I'm assuming are retaining pins, and I don't have them. I'd like to think that they were never there, but it's more likely that I lost them somewhere. Does anyone know what they're called, or where I can get them, or at least an acceptable substitute for them? I feel like I could cut some metal rods and throw them in there but they're probably cheap enough to just buy.
In the last picture are the gear fork things, again I don't have a name for them, but what position do they need to be in when I put all the gears back in?

Thanks!


PS I'm obviously going to clean the mating surfaces of the cases before they go back together. Got some honda bond somewhere to use for that.

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teazer

Active Member
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Most of us call them dowels and HONDA calls then knock pins or something like that. Last time I needed some I got them from my local Honda dealer. Not all of those holes have pins. On the main bearings one each are pins and the others are for oil IIRC.

The gear selector forks go into slots in teh various gears. Two on one gear shaft and one on the other. Jiggle teh shafts and gears into place and get it into neutral and you should be good to go.

Before you assemble it, clean the two mating faces and wipe them clean with acetone and then apply a THIN smear of Threebond to one face. Honda twins of that era are assembled upside down. Large blocks of wood are useful to prop up the back of the cases and don't forget to fit the cam chain and do not fit the sump plate until the cam chain is fully fitted.

Did you clean out the bottom case under those splash plates?
 
Do these look right? I separated the gears accidentally and I just can't understand the service manual's instructions on how they go. One of the gear selectors is on one set, two on the other. I have no idea how to get neutral from here but I'm hoping to put the case back together today.

Edit: Yeah I did figure out how to get those plates off and clean them, and I'm working on the mating surfaces now to prep for honda bond.


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teazer

Active Member
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That looks fine.

Slip the gear shift lever on and cycle through the gears while turning one of the shafts by hand. It will soon be obvious if they are correct. if teh dogs hit each other, keep rotating the shaft until they slip into engagement.
 
Looks like I'm good then. Got the case back together today, and the clutch and oil slinger thing all on. I somehow got completely wrong side gaskets so I'm waiting on those and then we'll be bolted up. Pics soon.

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teazer

Active Member
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Many gasket sets are for "vertical" ie 1970 on 175s. Sloper 175 was one year only. We use 160 side cover gaskets IIRC
 
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