1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)

Saturdays Wrench

New Member
Redliner, awesome stuff man! Thanks so much for the advice/guidance, really appreciate it. There are some upgrades I want to do to the engine so it will be worked on no matter what, with the help of a professional. It's a whole learning experience for me so I really wanted to get my hands into everything. I'm learning so much and don't want to stop!

Glad you're on board as you will no doubt be of help again.. Cheers!
 

Redliner

New Member
As far as this board goes, the true blue veterans are going to be racers like Teazer and kopcicle. If there's anything you're scratching you're head over as far as which performance parts mingle well, that would be my top resource. bradj doesn't Honda, not at all, but he at least knows as much about four strokes in general to be of considerable help as well.

I'll leave it at this, before you upgrade a part, you have to ask if that is the bottle neck. You can have the hottest cam gracing this earth, but it will simply starve if the intake and exhaust won't support it.

You may also talk to Texasstar. He managed to take a 200cc bucket racer up to 99mph, at least last I heard, and that was his first build!
 

Saturdays Wrench

New Member
I totally hear what you are saying about the upgrades, it makes perfect sense.

Thanks for those resources, they will most certainly come in handy.. I appreciate it man!!
 

Saturdays Wrench

New Member
Can anyone please advise on these types of springs/shocks for the front forks? I really like the way they look and would like to do something similar with my build. I'm not sure what to look for or what size, etc to buy.

Any help would be appreciated, thanks!
 

Attachments

Redliner

New Member
That is a CL fork. The CL does not use an internal spring. What you see is the only means of suspension for the CL. I think it's supposed to allow for more cushion over the entire distance of travel compared to the tightly coiled CB springs, which are stiffer.

Since you want performance, consider swapping a front end with larger forks. The later model CB450 has larger forks and I believe swap right over with the entire tree. Look into that.

I've never worked on a CB/CL 350 that didn't have slightly tweaked forks. You'll notice when you do a wheel alignment that it just won't straighten out. I had to bend both of my forks and replace a bent tree. 33mm is just too damn small.
 

Saturdays Wrench

New Member
Redliner said:
That is a CL fork. The CL does not use an internal spring. What you see is the only means of suspension for the CL. I think it's supposed to allow for more cushion over the entire distance of travel compared to the tightly coiled CB springs, which are stiffer.

Since you want performance, consider swapping a front end with larger forks. The later model CB450 has larger forks and I believe swap right over with the entire tree. Look into that.
Thanks Redliner!

Hmm ok so the external springs are a bit softer? I guess that's not as good as the suspension on there now, say if I were to add some progressive springs to the forks I currently have? Would you recommend that option more?
 

Redliner

New Member
You're stock springs are progressive. They get tighter on one end. ;D

How fast do you plan to go? How will you use the bike? Is form more important than function?

On a side note, I'll warn you now not to waste your money on VM30 or VM32 carbs. That seems to be a reflexive action to anybody trying to cafe one of these for the first time and it's a wrong one. More on that later.
 

CALfeRacer

Fat man on a little bike
Redliner said:
On a side note, I'll warn you now not to waste your money on VM30 or VM32 carbs. That seems to be a reflexive action to anybody trying to cafe one of these for the first time and it's a wrong one. More on that later.
I'm interested to know why not to put VM30s on. I'm in the planning stage of a CB350 that doesn't have carbs and was considering going with VMs, either in 28 or 30.
 

Saturdays Wrench

New Member
Redliner said:
You're stock springs are progressive. They get tighter on one end. ;D

How fast do you plan to go? How will you use the bike? Is form more important than function?
Function is probably the most important.. Bike will be used for leisure/semi daily rider. I'd like it to be a bit faster than stock but that being said, I'm not taking it on any tracks. Just want it fun & fast!
 

Saturdays Wrench

New Member
CALfeRacer said:
I'm interested to know why not to put VM30s on. I'm in the planning stage of a CB350 that doesn't have carbs and was considering going with VMs, either in 28 or 30.
Quite intrigued also as I've heard or and seen a lot of builds using these carbs and was fully planing on implementing them.
 

Redliner

New Member
Considering the price that DCC lists a set of 32's for, it's a wonder nobody considers their options in the first place.

The idea is more carb means more air means more power. That ain't so when the valve guide bosses take up the whole damn port. There are some bottlenecks in the 350 and it ain't necessarily the stock carb.

Smaller carbs offer more take off power. I run VM26's that I pulled off of a Yamaha Banshee 2-stroke 350cc quad with stock motor and ports. Cost me $100. Once you run this setup, you'll wonder why Honda didn't choose the same. I'm told 28mm would be better for the top end, WOT, but I've never seen any sound advice for anything larger when it comes to slide carbs.

Talk to CrazyPJ about carbs. He likes the Honda twins and has a lot of experience here.

As for the suspension, if you're not hooning it up (often) then those CL forks may work for you. Just know they're really springy and dive on braking.
 

Saturdays Wrench

New Member
Cheers Redliner! The info is really helpful. I think I may just stick with the springs I currently have, but will do a bit more research. I will also look into the whole carb thing when it comes to it, not there yet though. Really appreciate your input though 8)
 

Saturdays Wrench

New Member
So for my 4th session I wanted to tackle those striped bolts on the crank case cover and remove the sprocket, chain, rear wheel, swing arm and shocks. After talking it over with my buddy Rob, an experienced bike builder who runs Bullit Customs Cycles, I felt pretty confident that this was the way to go. Luckily my dad (aka "Crazy Joe") has like every tool imaginable, so he knew exactly what I needed when I told him what was going on. He busts out an 8mm metal drill bit and I go to town on the bolts.. Eats through them with no problems and I get the cover off. Didn't even need vice grips when I got the cover off, which is a bit perplexing, just loosened the studs with my fingers. I know Redliner said not to drill into the case but it was my only option at that point. Damage to the case was very very minimal.. plus I kind of like the battle scars.

The chain and rear wheel assembly came off with no problems at all, same with the shocks and swing arm. I am actually feeling really good about this tear down. I never realized how amazing I would feel after going through the bike like this and I seriously recommend it to those of you who are unfamiliar with their bikes or just don't feel comfortable. Just get yourself a manual and take something apart! I seriously feel like I am really understanding the vehicle so much more the further I get into this.. it's a great feeling.

Here's the video if you're interested to see how it all went:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jojdc3IRBEE
 

Attachments

Redliner

New Member
The reason the bolt came out with your finger is that tension is applied by the bolt head.

Bolts are held in place by their elasticity. When you spin it clockwise, the threads pull the bolt in, obviously. Once the head reaches the surface, the bolt will stretch as you turn it since the head is holding it back.

Sometimes a bolt will lose elasticity with time and use.

Get a torque wrench and check all of the applicable bolts are torqued to spec. That axle nut is usually 65 ft/lbs or more and the rear axle about the same. Very important.

Replace the swing arm bushings with brass. They're a slight interference fit, so you'll need to freeze the brass and heat the swingarm and press the two together, preferably without just beating it in.

I think I saw a ball in your clutch throw-out lever, is this correct? If so, keep track of this and make sure it's still round.
I also see that your clutch rod has a ball-end. You do not need this ball if you have this ball end. In my experience you won't be able to properly adjust the clutch if you have it and don't need it, or need it and don't have it. Did you ever kick the bike over to feel compression with the ball fitted?

As for wheels, I don't believe you'll comfortably fit more than a 1.85" rim on the front with a 3.00" tyre. 2.15" on the rear with a 90 or 100mm with 90% profile would be the max. I'd prefer a 90 back there. If the rubber is too wide, you lose sidewall structure.

I think CB350's have 18" front and rear, CL has 19" front. I believe a larger diameter improves stability, it'd be a good point to ask the aforementioned experts, as they have experience with motorcycle geometry.

Here's a tip; the rear rim on your bike is a 1.85" ;)
 

xb33bsa

New Member
when drilling out the screws use a smaller bit ,so you dont drill into the case use a 15/64 inch bit, one size under 1/4" this is all the bigger you need to pop the head off the screw, bonus is it will go in easier
be careful not to loose the ball bearing out the clutch push rod actuator dealy bob
edit redliner beet me to it :)
 

Redliner

New Member
xb33bsa said:
be careful not to loose the ball bearing out the clutch push rod actuator dealy bob
Thank you, I did not want to have to refer to the parts manual for the pointless technical names ;D
 

Saturdays Wrench

New Member
Redliner said:
Replace the swing arm bushings with brass. They're a slight interference fit, so you'll need to freeze the brass and heat the swingarm and press the two together, preferably without just beating it in.

As for wheels, I don't believe you'll comfortably fit more than a 1.85" rim on the front with a 3.00" tyre. 2.15" on the rear with a 90 or 100mm with 90% profile would be the max. I'd prefer a 90 back there. If the rubber is too wide, you lose sidewall structure.
Thanks as always for your advice! I did actually hear about the brass bushings and was planing on doing that. I saw a guy on Youtube who did exactly what you mentioned (froze the bushings and heated the swing arm), so I was fully planing on doing just that, so thanks for confirming my thoughts. Any idea where I can source these brass bushings? Or do I need to fabricate?

As for the rims/tires, I have already fully researched and got some great advice from some experts. I ordered a 90/90 front on an 18x1.85" rim and a 90/100 rear on an 18x2.15". An experienced rim maker named Kennie Buchanan of Buchanan Spokes told me from personal experience that this combination works perfectly for this bike as he owns one himself. Great guy! Super helpful.

Redliner said:
I think I saw a ball in your clutch throw-out lever, is this correct? If so, keep track of this and make sure it's still round.
I also see that your clutch rod has a ball-end. You do not need this ball if you have this ball end. In my experience you won't be able to properly adjust the clutch if you have it and don't need it, or need it and don't have it. Did you ever kick the bike over to feel compression with the ball fitted?
xb33bsa said:
when drilling out the screws use a smaller bit ,so you dont drill into the case use a 15/64 inch bit, one size under 1/4" this is all the bigger you need to pop the head off the screw, bonus is it will go in easier
be careful not to loose the ball bearing out the clutch push rod actuator dealy bob
edit redliner beet me to it :)
Guys :eek: .. I think I lost the ball bearing! It was only until after I had taken off the cover that I noticed in the manual there was a small ball bearing in that "dealy bob" thing! I went back to the cover and looked at the assembly and didn't see it. It MAY just be camouflaged in grease from the chain/sprocket.. I don't know. How bad is this if I lost it? I know it's a "Steel Bearing #10 5/16" at least that's what the Fiche says.. oops :-[ Are they replaceable? I have to imagine that there must be a replacement somewhere on this earth.. but where!? ???

Thanks again for your input guys.
 

Redliner

New Member
Read my first reply to your video, post 34, about the ball.

I'm running the exact same rim/tyre setup on a Black Bomber now.
 

alzcbz

Member
Yes you need it and it is just a common 5/16" steel ball bearing. Probably pick up at any local hardware if you can't find it.
 

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