1973 CB350G Canadian Noob Build (Gotta start somewhere!)

Redliner

New Member
He doesn't need it if his rod has a ball-end. He can't find it likely because it's not there. I've heard this happen quite a few times.
 

Saturdays Wrench

New Member
I'll take some close ups next time and you can see closer and explain more because I'm still a bit unclear. Either way, sounds like it's easily replaceable if I DO need it.. Cheers guys.
 

xb33bsa

New Member
Saturdays Wrench said:
I'll take some close ups next time and you can see closer and explain more because I'm still a bit unclear. Either way, sounds like it's easily replaceable if I DO need it.. Cheers guys.
yes you need it but dont fret about it till you get ready for assembly
if it is still there a maggot on a stick will pull it outta the greese fer safe keaping
 

Saturdays Wrench

New Member
Happy Holidays everyone and Happy New Year!

For my 5th session, I took the engine out of the frame and removed the front fork assembly. The engine was pretty tricky to take out seeing as I had to use my dads car jack! With my dad steadying the frame I was able to slide it out. Good thing for the manual on this one as it said to take the engine out from the right side. I did not realize the frame was lower on that side, making engine removal easier, until I removed the engine. Another reason to always look at the manual ahead of time.. Learning that more and more as I go.

Really excited to see the engine out and the frame bare!! So many things I can move on with now like modifying the frame to fit a hoop and custom seat. I am really looking forward to using the angle grinder on that!

Here's my exploits in engine and fork removal:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3dTIunkGbss

here's some pics:
 

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Redliner

New Member
But sometimes the manual do lie.

The manual was written when the bike was fresh and all the testing and experimenting that was done was Honda's own. After 50-years, some ole farts have found what works best. As well, we now strictly use unleaded fuel, which effects some adjustments. Oil has also advanced.

Then there are discrepancies. Sometimes a manual will simply have a typo or incorrect procedures. It's good to have several manuals so you can cross-check them. The pre-K4 Honda manual is inconsistent in some regards to the K4 manual. Usually, you'll go with the later one, but sometimes they are model-specific.

I know it's confusing, but you'll eventually have a basic sense of what goes where and when.

Here's an example.

I don't know what octane rating you use there, but I doubt you will need 98 (R+M)/2.

I get this a LOT. I ask a customer "do you have fresh fuel in the tank." "YEP! Just filled up with premium, no regular crap."

I know the manual says 91-95 octane, too lazy to look, but that's the RON number. Most pumps will use the average of RON and MON, so at a pump that says (R+M)/2, 87 or 89 would be equivalent to the manual's RON number.

The idea is to use the lowest octane you can without knocking. No knock, no worries.

Also, premium does not "burn cleaner" than regular or lower octane fuels. So don't feel like you're feeding your bike crap just because it's cheep, and smile at the chump that's pouring "premium" into his Nissan.
 

ApexSpeed

Member
Great fun to follow, as this same bike will be my target next spring for my first rebuild. And Redliner, PLEASE keep offering advise and comments—your experience and insight is invaluable not just to Tony, but a lot of other greenhorns, as well. Two thumbs up.

TheCoffeeGuy said:
Buy some metric sockets.
I thought I was the only one cringing at the Imperial tool choices. Also, JIS (Japanese Industrial Standard) screwdrivers and JIS bits on an impact screwdriver will be a big help to you, Tony. They aren't regular Phillips screws on the old Japanese bikes, which is why they are all stripped out. The right tools for the job make everything easier (grandpa was right). Hope this helps.


doug
 

Saturdays Wrench

New Member
I have a few burning questions as I'm getting deeper into this build. I am almost through editing part 6 of my build process and have been busy meticulously sanding down the aluminum parts to give them a nice shine (pics/video to come) and torturing myself in the process... Can't stop now... must.. keep.. sanding!!

In the meantime wanted to know if anyone could help out with the following info:

1) I am looking for a reliable source for bronze bushings for the swing arm on my CB350. Anyone have any good sources for well made bronze bushings?

2) Since removing the forks from the bike and seeing the surface rust that has gathered near the top of the stanchions, I am wondering how to remove/repair this? Since it is chrome if I'm not mistaken. Does anyone have any tips for cleaning these stanchions or do I need to source new ones?

3) I have my sights set on a pair of Hagons for the rear shocks. Can anyone advise as to what length I should buy? I realize I could probably just measure the stock ones and go from there but I was looking to get some opinions about better handling with lower vs higher shocks, keeping in mind I am 80% sure I'm putting clip ons (or similar) or drag bars perhaps which will lower my stance, shifting my weight slightly forward. I'm approx 5'10" and weight 165lbs. Also, what is a good source to purchase these shocks?

Thanks in advance for any help!!
 

Saturdays Wrench

New Member
TheCoffeeGuy said:
http://charlies-place.com/product-category/bronze-swing-arm-bushings/
Thanks man, but I believe those are the wrong ones. There are 4 on the CB350 and they are more stubby than that. I appreciate it though man!
 

Saturdays Wrench

New Member
So for my 6th session I took the angle grinder to the frame to clean it up a little bit. I needed to cut off some of the tabs and make room for the battery box I want to fit underneath the new seat. I did not want to cut the back of the frame off yet as I was looking to get some advice from anyone on here who could lend it and also from some friends of mine.

Next, I tried to tackle taking the tires off the rims to get to the spokes and hubs but failed miserably with some old ass tire irons my dad had laying around. I bought a nice set of tire irons in the meantime and will get to the wheels on another wrench session. Having failed with the wheels I moved onto the swing arm bushings. Those little buggers are hell to remove! I did a bunch of research on how to remove them (some people are pretty creative! lol) and found the best method was with a punch and hammer. Smashed my hands a few times though but all worked out. Using this method will seriously damage the bushings, so beware! You're best bet is to replace them anyway with bronze bushings as they are far more superior and will last basically a life time. If you're looking for bronze bushings, contact Bob Franzke at franzke@attglobal.net and he will set you up nicely if you tell him you're from the forum.

After this I started on the reconditioning process on my aluminum parts, etc. I am going for a mirror shine on my engine side covers, forks and hubs. The process is going to take a while but I think it's going to look pretty amazing when it's all done. I soaked the greasy parts in Super Clean for a little bit and gave them a scrub with a small wire brush and it seemed to work perfectly. I also rinsed the parts thoroughly in warm water and even gave them a good scrubbing with a cleaning brush and soapy water. The super clean left the aluminum a little oxidized, but it did not matter as I plan on cutting into them with sand paper and buffing wheels. Be warned though if you're just looking to clean some of your parts and you use that Super Clean stuff, it will oxidized your aluminum and darken it significantly. As you will see in the video it works quite incredibly with chrome parts though!!

I've organized all the parts for PC in one box and all the parts that need to be reconditioned in another as you will see below.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IsTWSSw5JXY

Here's the process of the frame modification, pictures of the parts set for reconditioning and pics of the parts set aside for powdercoat.
 

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Redliner

New Member
Using water while removing tyres? 1. Break the bead all around on that side first. Then once you work it off, break the other side completely. 2. Replace the tubes and tube protector strip. Actually you could use duct tape to protect the tube. It's whatever. 3. Once your tyre is on, inflate the tube just a little (not even enough to register on most air gauges) and bounce the tyre on the ground a few times in different spots to work out any kinks or twists. Baby powder on the tube is a must.

Just look at other tyre installation tips on the site for the basics.
 

Saturdays Wrench

New Member
Cheers Redliner.. I used the soap and water to help lube the tire a bit to pry it off. My teacher in tech class showed me the tip when we covered tyre changing one day. Installing all new rims, spokes and tyres on this ride so I'll get them properly installed at a shop. I think it's worth the $15, saves me wrestling them on when they can do it in 3 seconds with that machine! The new tyres I bought are tubeless, so I'm looking forward to that!


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