1982 CB750F...Better Devil

Jimbonaut

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Yeah? Tell me more! I do still have the splitter in the lines - in fact I didn't think I had a choice to remove it. I figured that splitter could be the problem. Now that I have fluid in the lines all the way up to the reservoir, can I still bleed to the splitter? Would that involve cracking the banjo(s) at the splitter while I've got the brake lever pulled?
 

Maritime

Over 10,000 Posts
Ahh, that will be the source of your issues. So you can fix it a couple of ways. Reverse bleed to the splitter from each caliper. Crack the banjo and hold a rag to catch fluid. Air should burp. Then close banjo and continue to bleed to master. Or bleed from master cracking each splitter then proceed to bleed at caliper.
 

Jimbonaut

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Makes sense Mike, cheers. I'll try that and see what gives. I've also been told from a very reliable source that priming the mc first can really help.
 

Maritime

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I ditched the splitter on the GL by using a double banjo at the MC, made everything easier. I got the kit of Galfer lines already sized for it etc. I should have checked the splitter issue first. They trap air bad and can be a real bitch to get it out. I would reverse bleed first though as air wants to go up so build pressure in the line and crack the banjo then tighten it back quick a few times and you should get air out. Having the bike on the side stand and leaned over and doing the banjo on the high side first is also good. Air goes to the high side.
 

Jimbonaut

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I would reverse bleed first though as air wants to go up so build pressure in the line and crack the banjo then tighten it back quick a few times and you should get air out.
Would injecting fluid into the caliper (reverse bleed) build up the required pressure? Squeeze a bunch in and then crack the banjo at the splitter?
 

Maritime

Over 10,000 Posts
Yes, it should. If you can plug the MC as well it would also help. You want to force the fluid to the high side and then release the air. So if the bike is leaned over, go to the low caliper, pump fluid into it and then crack the high side banjo on the splitter, it should hiss a bit an let fluid out, close it off. then feed more and do it again until no air(hiss) just fluid comes out. Just make sure you have rags and cover all your painted stuff
 

Maritime

Over 10,000 Posts
SO to put it in pictures. Lean the bike over on the stand. Pump from the left, low side caliper and crack the splitter feed bolt which should be the highest point in the system at that point.

 

irk miller

You've been mostly-dead all day.
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I rarely have an issue simply filling the reservoir (keep cap off), pumping the lever until it's nearly empty and filling back up. Then repeat until the lines are full and the brakes work right. You always know the lines are full when air bubbles quit coming into the reservoir and fluid shoots up like a geyser. It takes five or ten minutes,, usually, and never more than thirty. Anytime that process doesn't work, it's because there's an air leak somewhere, usually the M/C piston.
 

Jimbonaut

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Thanks again for the brake help. I do have brake feel at the lever, not as firm as I'd like or at least not as firm as I was expecting. I'll try another bleed like you mentioned and see what gives. Things have been crazy busy the last few weeks (our condo is going on the market next week) so have not had that much time to work on the bike.

Hit another roadblock, this one's really got me mystified. The battery. It's not holding a charge very well. I haven't ridden the bike yet (just fired it up every now and then for tuning etc) but every day when I go to fire it up it hasn't got enough charge to turn the starter motor.

But here's where things get strange. I hook the battery up to a trickle charger, but only the green light comes on (indicating it's charged) even though it isn't and a multimeter check shows the battery is at 12.1v. Yesterday I tried plugging the charger into a different wall socket and somehow that got it to start charging (the orange light came on) and the volts went up to the point where I could re-install the battery in the bike and fire it up (12.7v). Today, the charger isn't doing anything again. Utterly stumped. Any ideas?

Edit - I took the battery to Canadian Tire who ran a diagnostic on it and the diagnostic is...not good. It has some voltage (around 12) but very low cranking amps (74). It was a brand new, good quality (Yuasa) battery around 3 months ago.

The bike has not been ridden, only started. A friend is bringing over a new battery on Monday. Now need to determine why the battery is dead. Hoping it's because of that sketchy positive cable I used to have hooked up - the one that was overheating.
 
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Jimbonaut

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Or maybe the battery was just a dud. I’ve since heard Yuasa batteries sometimes shit the bed right out the gate so maybe I got a lemon. Either way, once I’ve installed the new one Monday and run some tests on the harness I’ll have a better idea.


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doc_rot

Oh the usual... I bowl, I drive around...
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couldnt hurt to do a parasitic draw test. its pretty easy to check
 

Jimbonaut

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I saw a vid a while back explaining the process Doc, looked pretty straightforward if I remember correctly
 

Jimbonaut

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July 18th 2018. Had to check the start date, damn I'm slow. The Un-Irk. Just over two years and today I finally got to ride this thing round the block. Been buttoning it up for the last few weeks and could not be happier, it all came together in the end. The seat was made by Rod Alves here in Montreal and he killed it. She moves through the gears really smoothly, the new Delkevic exhaust really brings the engine to life (I'll get a vid of it soon) and nothing fell off when I did my few laps around the block.







Carbs'll need a little fine tuning, but the Better Devil's rubber has hit the road.
 
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Jimbonaut

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Aye - I have a ‘76 gl sitting in the garage, slowly getting overwhelmed by cardboard boxes and stealthy spiders. Unearth that old lady and she’s next on the block.


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