'71 CL350 - First Bike, First Cafe

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session101

New Member
So i bought this bike from John on here, and took it home and got started on getting a title...
time passed and i got anxious so i started tearing it down because even if i couldn't get it registered i could part it out... After getting the bike stripped, not long after i got the title in the mail (YAY)

so I have a blog with the build that i update but ill add to it on here to keep you guys posted.

This is my first motorcycle, so i hope i can learn the most from this build and forever apply the knowledge wherever i go, I only have automotive experience but nothing that involves fully tearing down a motor and rebuilding it. I will be asking for a lot of help and guidance so bear with me on that. anyway here are some pics of what is going on.

















 

session101

New Member
So basically Im deciding what to do about the motor, i don't know if i have the capabilities to tear it all down and build it all back up, or if i should just take it to a shop that would have a faster turn around and be able to hopefully do it right... Im hoping to only clean the motor, new seals, SS bolt kit, roller cam chain, KA chain slipper and hopefully just new rings and hone after cleaning the pistons...

I have realized from many posts... YOU CANNOT MAKE A CB350 FASTER FROM MOTOR MODS!!

the key is to make the motor stock, and just make it bullet-proof, you want to go faster, then you do it with the weight, that's the only way to make the bike faster.

I decided to start with the carbs... nice yellow gummy gel on the inside of the float bowl and other areas..















 

session101

New Member
So i only started cleaning the first carb so i will have the 2nd as a reference where everything goes, so after an overnight bath in carbeurator cleaner and then a nice scrub and dip in some simple green, they turned out pretty nice. I am looking at ordering a SS bolt kit for the carbs and i will need to buy a rebuild kit for the carbs, don't know which one to buy, any help or success stories with that? and i need to get the gaskets and filter for my petcock.












Oh and I also picked up this bench for a mere $35 which was well worth it, so here's my setup now



 

MNBikerPup

Newbie Rider into all motorcycles.
session101 said:
So i bought this bike from John on here, and took it home and got started on getting a title...
time passed and i got anxious so i started tearing it down because even if i couldn't get it registered i could part it out... After getting the bike stripped, not long after i got the title in the mail (YAY)

so I have a blog with the build that i update but ill add to it on here to keep you guys posted.

Chuckle, I did the same thing with my first bike (1981 Kawasaki KZ650). Took a year for me though to get a title. Now, need carb work. LOL Good luck on your build.

This is my first motorcycle, so i hope i can learn the most from this build and forever apply the knowledge wherever i go, I only have automotive experience but nothing that involves fully tearing down a motor and rebuilding it. I will be asking for a lot of help and guidance so bear with me on that. anyway here are some pics of what is going on.

















 

AlphaDogChoppers

Science is true whether you believe in it or not.
What makes you think the motor needs to be rebuilt?
I wouldn't rebuild it unless there is evidence that you need to. It has less than 6,000 miles on it. Get it running first, then you can evaluate the condition of the engine.
 

session101

New Member
my reasoning is... the motor is already out, why not? and i did a compression check with poor results, besides if i get this motor back in and it runs for only 1000 miles then breaks ill be pissed, i would rather just freshen it up and have confidence that it won't give me problems for a while
 

AlphaDogChoppers

Science is true whether you believe in it or not.
How did you do that compression test? Did you activate the starter to spin it over? Did you have the carbs off or blocked open, including having the slides blocked open?

An engine that has been sitting for a long time will usually give a poor compression test. The cylinders will be dry, and of course, the engine is cold.

Seriously, taking the engine apart "just because" is kinda silly. Build the bike first, and get the engine running. Why waste money on a rebuilt that in all likelihood you don't need.
 

pugeyed

New Member
see i dont agree alpha, iv rebuilt my xs850 engine (just because i can).
that way when i hit the starter button i know (not hope) things will be ok.
good job i did too because i found a few issues that needed sorting.
depends how far you want to go with a bike but i rebuild everything i can and replace everything i can that way i know its all good.

BUT just because its new doesnt mean its any good or works! ::)
 

AlphaDogChoppers

Science is true whether you believe in it or not.
pugeyed said:
see i dont agree alpha, iv rebuilt my xs850 engine (just because i can).
The key is what you have in parentheses.

I wasn't giving this advice to you, because you have the knowledge and experience to do whatever you want. The original poster does not have that knowledge and experience. He is just as likely to fuck something up as he is to fix it. <G>

I say start the engine up first, and evaluate it based on how it runs, and a valid compression test on a warm engine that is being spun over at cranking speed. Not a cold engine that hasn't been run in years turned over with a wrench.

The very first thing I do to an old bike that has been sitting for a long time, is I get the engine running. It is a fine method for evaluating its condition. An engine has ways of telling you it needs attention. Engine tear-down is the LAST thing I do, and only if there is some indication that it should be done. Just the gaskets alone can be a pretty big expenditure, and often unnecessary.

I shoot some WD40 into the spark plug holes for initial lubrication, throw some fuel in the tank and crank that baby over. It usually reveals some desperately needed carburetor work, but they almost always start. They often smoke for a minute or two until the rings get limbered up and the varnish washed off the cylinder walls. THEN you can get a valid compression test.
 

DreadRock

Bang Cut Grind ..Dam Did I Need That Part ?
DTT BOTM WINNER
Got a 71 CL in parts sitting in my shop ! Not that im disargeeing with Alpha because im doing that on my XS but if you feel you want to do a tear down and learn your bike inside and out then go for it !
 

kelvis

New Member
I tend to agree with Alpha, if it ain't broke, don't fix it. If you can get it running and it has good compression, a good service should be enough.

If it turns out it needs a rebuild, grab a workshop manual and get stuck in! You'll learn a ton of stuff that can be carried across to most other engines (basic principles are the same). Stick to the instructions in the manual, get some good advice from DTT and you'll be done in no time! And you'll have the satisfaction of knowing you did it yourself!
 

session101

New Member
so I ordered this from powersports.com and it came in 2 days... not bad at all



after i nap tomorrow ill be sure to put those on. So i have a question is there a manual to rebuilding the carbs? and a more clear case of setting the floats? the manual doesn't specify, OH and it has a very nice unlabeled diagram with numbers and no words....





also to set the floats it uses the same word twice such as...

"remove the float chamber cover, position the float to the point where the float arm barely touches the float arm.." someone obviously didn't finish high school when then wrote this can anyone clarify?

so is there a carb book for these carbs?
 

session101

New Member
so i finally got 1 carb done

i didn't use 2 parts that someone said they didn't use either

but what about my idle screw? i think its high but ive tried everything to get it to go lower, all i can think now is to get a bigger screw?

I lightly machined the throttle plate to get all the scratches and nic's out of the edges because the carb was frozen when i got it, so it should fit better but it still doesn't get my idle screw down far enough, take a look





 

cyclhed

New Member
Good job on the carbs.

On the engine the thing to consider is if the bike has been sitting for a long time then there will most likely be rust in the cylinders and valves and valve seats. I would take the top end off and inspect the cylinders and pistons and then you can hone the cylinders and install new rings. You can also clean all the carbon out of the combustion chambers and inspect the valves and seats for corrosion. You may need to lap the valves to get rid of any rust, or maybe cut the seats and resurface the valves. These engines are really easy to take apart and put back together if you have a manual for the first time. Take a look at my SL350 engine, the link is below. You probably don't need a new chain or tensioner unless you plan of road racing. The most you will need is a gasket set and maybe piston rings because you may break them getting them out of the pistons if they are rusted. Let me know if you have any questions.
 

johngofast

New Member
Dang buddy, you're attacking that thing, very excited to see what direction you go with your build. My oppinion, if you plan to keep the bike for a while and you plan to ride it hard, do a top end rebuild and do it yourself. Everything you need to know is quickly available online.

Glad you got the title so fast, now get that thing ready for spring and lets go out for some rides, we need to get some people together for some wrench and rides next year in Salt Lake.
 
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