CB550F Cafe Interceptor

tsbigdog

Been Around the Block
Work of Art!. I subscribe to the philosophy that most of the time the manufacturers got it 80 to 90% right on their design and a little tweaking here and there adds up to perfection. I guess that's why I'm a fan of Chip Foose's work on cars. This is a supreme example of this. To me this is what Honda would build today if they wanted a retro design of a CB (similar to what Triumph did with the Thruxton). Enjoy this bike as much as you can and if I were you I would never sell it.


Thank you for also putting the time in to document your process. There are a lot of people on this site that have contributed a ton of information. That makes our projects all the more easier. Someday I hope to be in your company.
 

knumbnutz

New Member
Hi !


Fantastic build. Attention to detail is excellent.


If it were my bike, I would go this pipe OR 4in to 4 like the MV and honda race bikes of the 60's.
1140CB550FInterceptor.jpg





Here is honda CB550/4 dressed up as MV race bike, maybe a thought ?


3851112887_1a674db75c_o.jpg
 

One80Auto

Active Member
Jimmy, amazing build quality! Quick question for you on mounting the modern forks/calipers with wire wheels, as I am going through the process on my project. After all your caliper clearancing, how much clearance did you ultimately end up with between spokes and caliper? From the picture early in the thread it looks like about 3 mm? You showed the 6 mm of thickness for the top of the cylinder bore, do you recall how much of that you ended up taking away? Thanks.
 

One80Auto

Active Member
FunJimmy said:
I could go out and actually measure it if you wish, but 3mm is about right, and if memory serves me, the caliper just touched the spokes, so I cut 3mm off the highest point. That would be a bit less off the area of the piston bore though.

FJ

Thanks that helps alot with some of my planning. I think my clearancing will pretty similar to your setup. I am using different calipers so I need to get ahold of one to sacrifice. I'm sure cylinder bore thickness is similar accross the manufacturers but I might as well make sure. Thanks again.
 

oxford

Active Member
Some fantastic work in this thread. I don't know if it was made mention or not, but in refrence to using a drill press as a milling machine. You should not use a regular jacobs chuck(which the op did not) for holding a mill. They are not designed to take a side load which an end mill will introduce. If you are going to do it get a holder(like the op did) to match the same taper as your drill press spindle.
 

FunJimmy

Been Around the Block
oxford said:
Some fantastic work in this thread. I don't know if it was made mention or not, but in refrence to using a drill press as a milling machine. You should not use a regular jacobs chuck(which the op did not) for holding a mill. They are not designed to take a side load which an end mill will introduce. If you are going to do it get a holder(like the op did) to match the same taper as your drill press spindle.

Thanks Oxford,

That's a good point.
I purchased an end mill holder that had the correct taper for my drill press.
It's still a crude milling setup, but it can get the less precise jobs done.
 

FunJimmy

Been Around the Block
Here's a little vid of a road the Northwest WA guys will recognize.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vOE5fTQT-rU&hd=1

Enjoy
FJ
 

FunJimmy

Been Around the Block
Spent the afternoon at Twinline Motorcycles in Seattle.
Great bunch of guys that really know CR carbs.

<a href="http://vimeo.com/43829393">CB550 Interceptor - Dyno Tuning</a>
from <a href="http://vimeo.com/user12088295">FunJimmy</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.

Cheers
FJ
 

FunJimmy

Been Around the Block
Although a good protector, I often thought the front fender looked a bit heavy for a lean Cafe, so out came the saw.


IMG_4537.jpg


2067FrontFender.jpg


After a couple of creative cocktails, I think it turned out quite well.

P1000616.jpg


P1000617.jpg
 

gentlemanjim

Been Around the Block
Most excellent. I'm always stunned and in awe with such factory like precision machining and fitment. I don't what your profession is, but you should really consider making and selling ready to bolt on kits - fork, brake, manifolds, rear sets, etc. These skills need to be shared by others. I just finished a CB650 cafe and although its got the look that I was after it certainly lacks the extreme level of sofistication that you have achieved. - Bravo!
 

biker_reject

Over 1,000 Posts
FunJimmy said:
I still have to make an exhaust hanger and won’t be using the lathe for any part of it, so I’ve been considering a step by step thread on building parts from thick plate aluminum using common workshop tools. [/font][/size]

Please do! I know I could use a tutorial. What kind of lathe do you use, BTW?
 

FunJimmy

Been Around the Block
I’ve been using some inexpensive 18 LED signals I found on eBay for a while now and although I like the housing design, the LED circuit board is crap. Individual LED start to burn out leaving a weak and spotty effect so I’ve been on the hunt for a suitable replacement for some time now and think I’ve got one.

These are single 3W Eagle Eye LED signals housed in waterproof billet aluminum housings with 3M double sided tape. They’re very affordable at around $14.00/set and super bright.



Small and slick!



Check out the comparison vid.

http://youtu.be/vcs3I3kSTiU
 

FunJimmy

Been Around the Block
Ok, just back from a two day trip through the North Cascade Hwy and into B.C. with Branden & Wookie and the bike is running like a champ.

With my mystery cam correctly timed and Doctor_D's jetting, that 48.8 HP is in my rear view mirror, Baby!

See for yourself.


https://vimeo.com/45488513
 

snmavridis

Gettin my life together. One bolt. At a time.
i am thoroughly amazed at this build. this attention to detail is exactly what i hope to achieve when i rebuild a bike someday. my mind right now is just getting a bike that runs well and looks pretty, but one day i'll rebuild a junker. you are my inspiration.

two questions if you dont mind my asking:

1) what's your profession? your machining is IMPECCABLE and you seem to have all the tools necessary.

2) how much are you in this bike for? what with the carbon fiber and anodized aluminum, i'm assuming quite the pretty penny.

great job man! really cant stress that enough!
 

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